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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2000
Let me see if I understand this correctly. The new plan of LAUSD Supt. Ramon Cortines (March 14) is to take underachieving school district bureaucrats who are ruining the education of hundreds of thousands of students and send them back to schools as "teachers, principals and deans," where each of them can ruin the education of only 1,000 students. This is a "culture of hope and optimism"? Am I missing something here? BRIAN KAY Encino
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles schools will remove high-sugar chocolate- and strawberry-flavored milk from their lunch and breakfast menus after food activists campaigned for the change, L.A. schools Supt. John Deasy announced this week. Deasy revealed his intent, which will require approval by the Los Angeles Unified Board of Education, during an appearance with celebrity chef Jamie Oliver on "Jimmy Kimmel Live!" Tuesday night. The policy change is part of a carefully negotiated happy ending between the Los Angeles Unified School District and Oliver.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1997
Re "Flying on Automatic," editorial, Nov. 9: How in the world can LAUSD Supt. Ruben Zacarias justify giving himself a $10,000 pay raise after four months in office? The $178,000 or so that he already receives for not having done anything isn't enough? I have been a teacher with LAUSD for 14 years. Each year I have had to subsidize my classroom materials to the tune of approximately $3,000. This year, after eight years of pay cuts, we have received a "raise": I've just gotten an $80 increase in my paycheck today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2010 | Steve Lopez
Good morning. May I have your attention? Go ahead, enjoy your caramel macchiato while we chat, or is it an iced cinnamon dolce latte? I'm not going to kid you, folks. As my colleagues on the editorial board pointed out last week, there are lots of good reasons to vote against Measure E on the June ballot, the temporary $100 annual parcel tax that would raise $92.5 million a year during each of the four years it would be in effect for Los Angeles Unified schools. For starters, times are tough, and people don't want to dig into their pockets right now, especially since there's no citizen oversight written into the measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1997
Re "Zacarias Cracks the Whip," Aug. 4. I am delighted to see [LAUSD Supt. Ruben] Zacarias' plans for accountability in education, especially when recalling those of his predecessor, and hope he gets the support necessary to see his program through to a definite conclusion. He should be eager to accept the assistance of Ted Mitchell, "a high-ranking UCLA administrator who formerly headed the Graduate School of Education," and should apply Mitchell's ideas in an accountable experimental way. Low-scoring schools could be matched into three comparable groups--one group to use primarily Mitchell's academic advice, another to use primarily teacher-training by outstanding teachers, and the third group free to choose and apply methods used in more successful neighboring schools.
OPINION
May 1, 2002
Re "$459 Million in Cuts Are Considered for Fiscally Strapped L.A. Schools," April 26: If the board decides to cut the library aide positions to three hours a day, it will not only close the elementary school libraries for half the day but also, over time, destroy them. It is not possible in three hours a day to 1) meet with the library committee to discuss expenditure of funds; 2) complete book orders, process new books, check them into the computer and shelve them; 3) maintain five computers, three software programs, the card catalog and keep patron files current; 4)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2000
Re "Campaign for Prop. 38 Lies About Our Teachers," Commentary, Oct. 30: The organizations UTLA President Day Higuchi and LAUSD Supt. Roy Romer represent are the same ones that told us ending bilingual education would hurt English-as-a-second-language children. They were wrong then, and they are wrong now. The LAUSD gave us the Belmont Learning Center fiasco. It didn't know what it was doing then, and that hasn't changed. These greedy rascals gladly put their own salaries, job security and power ahead of our kids' education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1998
Re "Zacarias Seeks to Defy Wilson on Tests in English," Feb. 10: LAUSD Supt. Ruben Zacarias' latest recommendation to the Board of Education to question and possibly refuse to test non-English students using a test in English is realistic and should be supported. Taxpayers need to appreciate and acknowledge his common sense. The governor wants to test children in a language they cannot read. It is a waste of resources, time and money for state taxpayers. This is to say nothing about the loss of self-esteem for children and teachers alike.
OPINION
August 22, 1999
Re "Fight Shapes Up as Zacarias Vows to Keep Job," Aug. 17: Cheers for Harold Williams, urging that the apparent "ugly confrontation . . . developing around [LAUSD Supt. Ruben Zacarias'] future . . . needs to be stopped." What is (really) going on when individuals, however well-intentioned, generate behind-the-scenes forces that are demonstrably diverting the school board and superintendent "from concentrating their attention on the education of our children and on the superintendent's accountability for improving student achievement"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2010 | Steve Lopez
Good morning. May I have your attention? Go ahead, enjoy your caramel macchiato while we chat, or is it an iced cinnamon dolce latte? I'm not going to kid you, folks. As my colleagues on the editorial board pointed out last week, there are lots of good reasons to vote against Measure E on the June ballot, the temporary $100 annual parcel tax that would raise $92.5 million a year during each of the four years it would be in effect for Los Angeles Unified schools. For starters, times are tough, and people don't want to dig into their pockets right now, especially since there's no citizen oversight written into the measure.
OPINION
May 1, 2002
Re "$459 Million in Cuts Are Considered for Fiscally Strapped L.A. Schools," April 26: If the board decides to cut the library aide positions to three hours a day, it will not only close the elementary school libraries for half the day but also, over time, destroy them. It is not possible in three hours a day to 1) meet with the library committee to discuss expenditure of funds; 2) complete book orders, process new books, check them into the computer and shelve them; 3) maintain five computers, three software programs, the card catalog and keep patron files current; 4)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2000
Re "Campaign for Prop. 38 Lies About Our Teachers," Commentary, Oct. 30: The organizations UTLA President Day Higuchi and LAUSD Supt. Roy Romer represent are the same ones that told us ending bilingual education would hurt English-as-a-second-language children. They were wrong then, and they are wrong now. The LAUSD gave us the Belmont Learning Center fiasco. It didn't know what it was doing then, and that hasn't changed. These greedy rascals gladly put their own salaries, job security and power ahead of our kids' education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2000
Let me see if I understand this correctly. The new plan of LAUSD Supt. Ramon Cortines (March 14) is to take underachieving school district bureaucrats who are ruining the education of hundreds of thousands of students and send them back to schools as "teachers, principals and deans," where each of them can ruin the education of only 1,000 students. This is a "culture of hope and optimism"? Am I missing something here? BRIAN KAY Encino
OPINION
August 22, 1999
Re "Fight Shapes Up as Zacarias Vows to Keep Job," Aug. 17: Cheers for Harold Williams, urging that the apparent "ugly confrontation . . . developing around [LAUSD Supt. Ruben Zacarias'] future . . . needs to be stopped." What is (really) going on when individuals, however well-intentioned, generate behind-the-scenes forces that are demonstrably diverting the school board and superintendent "from concentrating their attention on the education of our children and on the superintendent's accountability for improving student achievement"?
MAGAZINE
March 8, 1998 | AMY PYLE, Amy Pyle is a Times education writer
They have been called to the principal's office for a moment they have been dreading. The niceties are over--Can I get you coffee? Take your coat off. How's your brother?--and their hard work has been reduced to a few disappointing numbers. It could not be more devastating, more embarrassing. Nor more unusual. * This is no ordinary principal-teacher conference. The principal in this case is Supt. Ruben Zacarias, who eight months ago took on the daunting task of guiding the L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1998
Re "Zacarias Seeks to Defy Wilson on Tests in English," Feb. 10: LAUSD Supt. Ruben Zacarias' latest recommendation to the Board of Education to question and possibly refuse to test non-English students using a test in English is realistic and should be supported. Taxpayers need to appreciate and acknowledge his common sense. The governor wants to test children in a language they cannot read. It is a waste of resources, time and money for state taxpayers. This is to say nothing about the loss of self-esteem for children and teachers alike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1996
There is a move by several members of the Los Angeles school board to vote today on a replacement for Supt. Sid Thompson, who announced less than a week ago that he plans to retire next year. It's far too early to make such a decision. The Los Angeles Unified School District needs the best possible candidate. Its nearly 650,000 students and their parents deserve a measured, thoughtful search for Thompson's successor. The top job is not a prize to be handed out without a national search.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure to change Los Angeles school district personnel policies, Supt. Sid Thompson will ask the Board of Education today to allow some schools--including Sun Valley Middle School--to hire principals regardless of whether they have passed the required exam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1997
Re "Flying on Automatic," editorial, Nov. 9: How in the world can LAUSD Supt. Ruben Zacarias justify giving himself a $10,000 pay raise after four months in office? The $178,000 or so that he already receives for not having done anything isn't enough? I have been a teacher with LAUSD for 14 years. Each year I have had to subsidize my classroom materials to the tune of approximately $3,000. This year, after eight years of pay cuts, we have received a "raise": I've just gotten an $80 increase in my paycheck today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1997
Re "Zacarias Cracks the Whip," Aug. 4. I am delighted to see [LAUSD Supt. Ruben] Zacarias' plans for accountability in education, especially when recalling those of his predecessor, and hope he gets the support necessary to see his program through to a definite conclusion. He should be eager to accept the assistance of Ted Mitchell, "a high-ranking UCLA administrator who formerly headed the Graduate School of Education," and should apply Mitchell's ideas in an accountable experimental way. Low-scoring schools could be matched into three comparable groups--one group to use primarily Mitchell's academic advice, another to use primarily teacher-training by outstanding teachers, and the third group free to choose and apply methods used in more successful neighboring schools.
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