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OPINION
May 31, 2003
Re "L.A. District Weighs Furloughs to Save Jobs," May 24: Rather than propose to place the burden of budget shortfalls upon those who work and care directly for our children, here are a few suggestions to help the LAUSD save money: (1) Return all literacy and math coaches to the classroom, where they can work directly with students. (2) Reduce all after-school staff development meetings. The vast majority of these meetings mainly "develop" the staff's ability to sit and turn their brains off instead of providing any useful ideas that can be used in the classroom.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2013 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
They won nationals. Then they won it again, setting record scores. And on Friday, the winning streak in the Los Angeles Unified School District's Academic Decathlon continued for Granada Hills Charter High School. The school beat out dozens of Los Angeles campuses in the district-wide competition, it was announced Friday evening at an awards ceremony. In the 10-subject battle of wits, the competitors - from 58 L.A. Unified schools - faced such subjects as math and science, literature, music and art, as well as gave speeches and were interviewed by judges.
OPINION
October 4, 2003
As I read "Plan for Arts Campus Questioned" (Sept. 28), I could not help but think about the L.A. Unified School District high school that I have taught in for 17 years. The Downtown Magnets High School appears to be a "secret" school, a mere five blocks west of Grand on Temple. Although we have been there for over 20 years, we are the stepchild of the building boom in the LAUSD. This is particularly strange, since our major focus is our business magnet, which emphasizes finance, accounting and entrepreneurship.
OPINION
April 5, 1998
The great majority of L.A. Unified schoolteachers are dedicated, hard-working professionals. By almost any evaluation, 98% would qualify for higher salaries than they now earn, if they were in some other profession in the real "working world" you refer to in your March 29 editorial, "LAUSD: Make Merit Count." Look at the job we ask them to do: More than 80 languages are spoken by the immigrant children who have flooded L.A. classrooms, classrooms that chronically lack textbooks and supplies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2011 | Hector Tobar
Rosemarie Bernier, the librarian at Hamilton High School, sees hundreds of students every day. She knows them by their study habits, the questions they ask and the books they read. Joelle and Johanna love to run their fingers through old books. We find them in the stacks, admiring the beautiful, old binding of a Jules Verne novel. Another group of "regulars" gathers at a table. Nahum and Livingston leaf through sheets of sample calculus problems, while Antonio reads the final chapters of Toni Morrison's great novel "Song of Solomon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2013 | By Howard Blume
An insurance company has sued the Los Angeles Unified School District seeking to avoid paying settlement costs related to alleged child abuse at Miramonte Elementary School. The action, if successful, could leave the nation's second-largest school system on the hook for an estimated $30 million that it agreed to pay to 58 alleged victims of former teacher Mark Berndt. At least as many claims remained unresolved, with attorneys seeking higher compensation than the settlement provides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1997
In "To LAUSD: Don't Take the Utilities' Bait" (Commentary, June 10) Benjamin M. Reznik and Daniel W. Douglass attempt to characterize the potential air-conditioning agreement between the Los Angeles Unified School District and the Energy Alliance as one between a naive, dull-witted entity and a wolf ready to pounce. They couldn't be more wrong. LAUSD is doing its homework before engaging in this agreement. And LAUSD realizes that the Energy Alliance, which is composed of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, Pacific Enterprises and Enova Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2013 | By Richard Winton
Jurors say the LAUSD must pay a fourth-grade special needs student $1.4 million after she was sexually assaulted five times by a male classmate during an after-school program in Chatsworth. Santa Monica jurors made the decision Tuesday after an eight-day trial about how much the Los Angeles Unified School District should pay for the injuries the girl suffered due to inadequate supervision at the Superior Street Elementary campus. The boy sexually assaulted the girl behind a shed and tree, out of sight of a program supervisor, in spring 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
Los Angeles school police have sharply curtailed the number of tickets issued for truancy to L.A. Unified students by 93.7% over the last four years, reflecting a step back from punitive disciplinary practices, according to a new report. The report, by the Community Rights Campaign - an organizing effort to shift student disciplinary actions from police to schools and communities - also found that tickets for all offenses plunged by 54.8% from 2011-12 to 2012-13. But African Americans and Latinos still receive a disproportionate number of tickets: Blacks were almost six times and Latinos were twice as likely to be ticketed than whites, according to the report released last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles School Police Department has issued new rules aimed at reducing the number of truancy tickets written to students and focusing efforts instead on helping these students get to and remain in school. The new policy in the Los Angeles Unified School District, announced Thursday, is the latest change from a campaign to reform traditional school discipline that, advocates of the new policy say, results in ethnic and racial profiling and hardships for students and families.
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