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Laverne Baker

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October 30, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Byrds, the Los Angeles band whose 1965 recording of "Mr. Tambourine Man" ignited the folk-rock movement, and Ike & Tina Turner, whose soul revue was among the most dynamic live acts ever in pop, are among the seven new inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
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NEWS
March 12, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
LaVern Baker, the rhythm and blues singer best known for her gold record 1950s hits "Tweedle-Dee" and "Jim Dandy," has died. She was 67. Baker, who in 1991 became only the second woman inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, died Monday at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York City. A diabetic, she had suffered strokes and two years ago had both legs amputated below the knees. Among her other hits were "I Cried a Tear," "Shake a Hand," "Saved" and "See See Rider."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1995 | STEVE APPLEFORD
The great LaVern Baker re-emerged at the Cinegrill on Thursday after two years of illness--strokes, diabetes and resultant leg amputations--and the rhythm & blues pioneer seems ready to prove it was only a temporary setback. "This is the first time I've hit a note in two years," Baker told the crowd, pausing between songs in her wheelchair. "But God has been good to me." That remark was typical of Baker's generally cheery demeanor Thursday, the opening night of a two-week engagement at the club.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1995 | STEVE APPLEFORD
The great LaVern Baker re-emerged at the Cinegrill on Thursday after two years of illness--strokes, diabetes and resultant leg amputations--and the rhythm & blues pioneer seems ready to prove it was only a temporary setback. "This is the first time I've hit a note in two years," Baker told the crowd, pausing between songs in her wheelchair. "But God has been good to me." That remark was typical of Baker's generally cheery demeanor Thursday, the opening night of a two-week engagement at the club.
NEWS
March 12, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
LaVern Baker, the rhythm and blues singer best known for her gold record 1950s hits "Tweedle-Dee" and "Jim Dandy," has died. She was 67. Baker, who in 1991 became only the second woman inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, died Monday at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York City. A diabetic, she had suffered strokes and two years ago had both legs amputated below the knees. Among her other hits were "I Cried a Tear," "Shake a Hand," "Saved" and "See See Rider."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1991 | JOHN MILWARD, John Milward is a New York writer who specializes in pop music. and
LaVern Baker is on the stage of the Village Gate nightclub singing "Jim Dandy," and as the sax man takes a solo, she starts to do the twist, then playfully mimes a pain in her back. It's been 35 years since Baker recorded "Jim Dandy" and decades since she's performed a scheduled nightclub engagement in the United States, but rock 'n' roll doesn't always forget.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1995 | ELYSA GARDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Arriving at a friend's Manhattan apartment to conduct her first interview since having her second leg amputation because of diabetes, LaVern Baker briskly maneuvers her wheelchair as a nurse about half her age looks on with amused resignation. "She wears me out," the nurse says, while Baker deftly positions herself next to a sofa and gets right down to business. "I lost my legs," Baker, 65, announces. "But I didn't lose my mind. I'm tired of just sittin'. I want to do something.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1989
It appears that Mr. Hunt hasn't done his homework. The outstanding rhythm and blues singers of today are alive, well, recording and performing under the names of Patti Austin, Angela Bofill, Jean Carne, Miki Howard, Phyllis Hyman and Stephanie Mills. Much like Laverne Baker, these performers grace the stage with vocal talent equivalent to some of the early greats. Mr. Hunt, there are many great R&B singers around today. You just failed to mention them. GUY V. DE ROSA West Hollywood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
David "Panama" Francis, whose drumming was featured both in top Harlem nightclubs and legendary rock songs, has died. He was 82. Francis died Tuesday in Miami after a stroke. His career spanned seven decades. He first achieved fame in the late 1930s playing with the Savoy Sultans--once described by Dizzy Gillespie as "the swingingest band there ever was"--at the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem. The Sultans reemerged four decades later under Francis' leadership and drumming prowess.
NEWS
November 17, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
David "Panama" Francis, whose drumming was featured both in top Harlem nightclubs and legendary rock songs, has died. He was 82. Francis died Tuesday in Miami after a stroke. His career spanned seven decades. He first achieved fame in the late 1930s playing with the Savoy Sultans--once described by Dizzy Gillespie as "the swingingest band there ever was"--at the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem. The Sultans reemerged four decades later under Francis' leadership and drumming prowess.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1995 | ELYSA GARDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Arriving at a friend's Manhattan apartment to conduct her first interview since having her second leg amputation because of diabetes, LaVern Baker briskly maneuvers her wheelchair as a nurse about half her age looks on with amused resignation. "She wears me out," the nurse says, while Baker deftly positions herself next to a sofa and gets right down to business. "I lost my legs," Baker, 65, announces. "But I didn't lose my mind. I'm tired of just sittin'. I want to do something.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1991 | JOHN MILWARD, John Milward is a New York writer who specializes in pop music. and
LaVern Baker is on the stage of the Village Gate nightclub singing "Jim Dandy," and as the sax man takes a solo, she starts to do the twist, then playfully mimes a pain in her back. It's been 35 years since Baker recorded "Jim Dandy" and decades since she's performed a scheduled nightclub engagement in the United States, but rock 'n' roll doesn't always forget.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Byrds, the Los Angeles band whose 1965 recording of "Mr. Tambourine Man" ignited the folk-rock movement, and Ike & Tina Turner, whose soul revue was among the most dynamic live acts ever in pop, are among the seven new inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | SHARON COHEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They journey here for one last look into their past, one final farewell to the ghost town that uprooted their lives and still haunts their future. Every few days, people who called Times Beach home come back to say goodby to this poisoned place. Nearly a decade after dioxin was discovered here, the abandoned town--the empty houses, rusted cars and weed-filled yards--is about to be bulldozed and buried.
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