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NEWS
August 15, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Israeli officials Friday forecast a close vote on Sunday when the Cabinet is scheduled to decide whether to continue a costly seven-year-old project to build the Lavi jet fighter. State radio said the Cabinet, under pressure from the Army, the Defense and Finance ministries and the United States to scrap the warplane project, was almost evenly divided, with three members undecided. The debate will be the seventh since Washington urged Israel to drop the project in January. Israel has spent $1.
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NEWS
September 4, 1987 | United Press International
Angry Israeli aircraft workers Thursday rushed the gates of the Foreign Ministry to protest cancellation of the Lavi jet fighter project but were driven off by police firing tear gas. Eight people, including a ministry employee, were treated at a hospital when overcome by tear-gas fumes, police said. Israel radio said one demonstrator was arrested.
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NEWS
September 3, 1987
Israeli Cabinet minister Moshe Arens, angry over a government decision to scrap the Lavi fighter aircraft project, submitted his resignation, to take effect in 48 hours. Arens, a minister without portfolio, had threatened Sunday to resign after the government voted to abandon the costly Lavi in favor of cheaper, U.S.-built fighter aircraft. Meanwhile, hundreds of Israeli aircraft workers, enraged at the decision, protested outside Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir's house and lined up at the U.S.
NEWS
September 3, 1987
Israeli Cabinet minister Moshe Arens, angry over a government decision to scrap the Lavi fighter aircraft project, submitted his resignation, to take effect in 48 hours. Arens, a minister without portfolio, had threatened Sunday to resign after the government voted to abandon the costly Lavi in favor of cheaper, U.S.-built fighter aircraft. Meanwhile, hundreds of Israeli aircraft workers, enraged at the decision, protested outside Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir's house and lined up at the U.S.
NEWS
September 1, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Israel Aircraft Industries' 20,000 workers reacted in two ways Monday to the government's decision of the day before to scrap the Lavi jet fighter project. Both were bad political news for Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and his party, the Labor Alignment, which led the campaign to ground the Lavi. Hundreds of workers took angrily to the streets, burning tires, blocking the main Jerusalem-Tel Aviv highway, brandishing placards and shouting at anyone who would listen. "Peres: son of a whore!"
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | United Press International
Angry Israeli aircraft workers Thursday rushed the gates of the Foreign Ministry to protest cancellation of the Lavi jet fighter project but were driven off by police firing tear gas. Eight people, including a ministry employee, were treated at a hospital when overcome by tear-gas fumes, police said. Israel radio said one demonstrator was arrested.
NEWS
August 28, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Two days before a Cabinet deadline for the pivotal vote on Israel's controversial, multibillion-dollar Lavi jet fighter program, Foreign Minister Shimon Peres has switched sides in the debate and is now leading the fight to kill the project. The switch could be crucial, for Peres was one of the project's most loyal supporters. Israeli sources said Peres was influenced by strong U.S.
NEWS
August 10, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Israeli lawmakers voted overwhelmingly to continue the controversial Lavi jet fighter development project Sunday in an action that is non-binding but is seen nevertheless as an important indication of continued political support for the program. The action came at an extraordinary joint meeting of the Knesset (Parliament) Foreign Affairs and Finance committees, where the final tally showed 22 lawmakers in favor of continuing the multibillion-dollar project, with 6 opposed and 3 abstentions.
NEWS
August 13, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. State Department's surprise public call for Israel to scrap its controversial Lavi jet fighter program will definitely influence a key Cabinet vote on the project expected this weekend, officials here predicted Wednesday. But they said the final decision remains too close to call. Given Washington's nearly total funding of the Lavi project to date, Israeli officials were quick to acknowledge the Reagan Administration's right to speak out on the project.
NEWS
September 2, 1987
At least five protesters were injured and 15 were reported arrested in the second day of demonstrations to protest Israel's decision to scrap the Lavi jet fighter. Hundreds of Israeli aircraft industry workers stormed the runways of Ben-Gurion International Airport near Tel Aviv, disrupting airline flights before being dispersed by police. Workers also blocked Tel Aviv roads with burning tires and staged protests at the U.S. Embassy and the Israeli Defense Ministry.
NEWS
September 2, 1987
At least five protesters were injured and 15 were reported arrested in the second day of demonstrations to protest Israel's decision to scrap the Lavi jet fighter. Hundreds of Israeli aircraft industry workers stormed the runways of Ben-Gurion International Airport near Tel Aviv, disrupting airline flights before being dispersed by police. Workers also blocked Tel Aviv roads with burning tires and staged protests at the U.S. Embassy and the Israeli Defense Ministry.
NEWS
September 1, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Israel Aircraft Industries' 20,000 workers reacted in two ways Monday to the government's decision of the day before to scrap the Lavi jet fighter project. Both were bad political news for Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and his party, the Labor Alignment, which led the campaign to ground the Lavi. Hundreds of workers took angrily to the streets, burning tires, blocking the main Jerusalem-Tel Aviv highway, brandishing placards and shouting at anyone who would listen. "Peres: son of a whore!"
NEWS
August 31, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Swallowing its national pride, the Israeli government voted narrowly Sunday after a long and dramatic debate to cancel the multibillion-dollar Lavi jet fighter project. The decision was immediately welcomed in Washington, which took the extraordinary step two weeks ago of publicly urging Israel to drop the aircraft "in the best interests of both our countries." The United States has funded virtually the entire $1.5-billion cost of the project to date.
NEWS
August 28, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Two days before a Cabinet deadline for the pivotal vote on Israel's controversial, multibillion-dollar Lavi jet fighter program, Foreign Minister Shimon Peres has switched sides in the debate and is now leading the fight to kill the project. The switch could be crucial, for Peres was one of the project's most loyal supporters. Israeli sources said Peres was influenced by strong U.S.
NEWS
August 17, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Faced with an apparent Cabinet majority for canceling the controversial Lavi jet fighter program, Israel's two senior coalition leaders Sunday blocked a decisive vote for up to two more weeks. The postponement of what has been billed as one of the most crucial economic and strategic decisions in Israel's history followed extraordinary public intervention by the United States last week urging the Cabinet to cancel the project. Washington has bankrolled virtually all of the program's $1.
NEWS
August 15, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Israeli officials Friday forecast a close vote on Sunday when the Cabinet is scheduled to decide whether to continue a costly seven-year-old project to build the Lavi jet fighter. State radio said the Cabinet, under pressure from the Army, the Defense and Finance ministries and the United States to scrap the warplane project, was almost evenly divided, with three members undecided. The debate will be the seventh since Washington urged Israel to drop the project in January. Israel has spent $1.
NEWS
August 31, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Swallowing its national pride, the Israeli government voted narrowly Sunday after a long and dramatic debate to cancel the multibillion-dollar Lavi jet fighter project. The decision was immediately welcomed in Washington, which took the extraordinary step two weeks ago of publicly urging Israel to drop the aircraft "in the best interests of both our countries." The United States has funded virtually the entire $1.5-billion cost of the project to date.
NEWS
August 17, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Faced with an apparent Cabinet majority for canceling the controversial Lavi jet fighter program, Israel's two senior coalition leaders Sunday blocked a decisive vote for up to two more weeks. The postponement of what has been billed as one of the most crucial economic and strategic decisions in Israel's history followed extraordinary public intervention by the United States last week urging the Cabinet to cancel the project. Washington has bankrolled virtually all of the program's $1.
NEWS
August 13, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. State Department's surprise public call for Israel to scrap its controversial Lavi jet fighter program will definitely influence a key Cabinet vote on the project expected this weekend, officials here predicted Wednesday. But they said the final decision remains too close to call. Given Washington's nearly total funding of the Lavi project to date, Israeli officials were quick to acknowledge the Reagan Administration's right to speak out on the project.
NEWS
August 10, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Israeli lawmakers voted overwhelmingly to continue the controversial Lavi jet fighter development project Sunday in an action that is non-binding but is seen nevertheless as an important indication of continued political support for the program. The action came at an extraordinary joint meeting of the Knesset (Parliament) Foreign Affairs and Finance committees, where the final tally showed 22 lawmakers in favor of continuing the multibillion-dollar project, with 6 opposed and 3 abstentions.
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