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NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
TUNICA, Miss. - Marie Barnard was delighted when, after decades of silence on the topic, Mississippi passed a law requiring school districts to teach sex education. But the lesson involving the Peppermint Pattie wasn't what she had in mind for her sons. The curricula adopted by the school district in Oxford called on students to unwrap a piece of chocolate, pass it around class and observe how dirty it became. "They're using the Peppermint Pattie to show that a girl is no longer clean or valuable after she's had sex - that she's been used," said Barnard, who works in public health.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | Steve Lopez
In Los Angeles, patrol officers are caught disabling recording equipment that was in place to keep them honest. In Santa Monica, a high school student demonstrates why the wrestling coach is the last faculty member to mess with. And in Glendale, a young woman challenges the definition of "hands-free" driving after getting a ticket for talking on a phone tucked into her head scarf. These three police blotter tales have little in common, except that I've assembled them in a nice spring bouquet, along with a prickly observation or two. First the LAPD.
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OPINION
February 23, 2014 | By Adam Winkler
What's the best way to minimize the number of guns on California's streets? That's the question confronting gun control supporters after this month's ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals striking down San Diego's restrictions on carrying handguns in public. That case was brought by gun owners who applied for but were denied permits to carry concealed weapons. San Diego will undoubtedly appeal the decision in the hope of saving its restrictive policy for awarding concealed carry permits.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | Ken Dilanian
When federal prosecutors charged Colorado resident Jamshid Muhtorov in 2012 with providing support to a terrorist organization in his native Uzbekistan, court records suggested the FBI had secretly tapped his phones and read his emails. But it wasn't just the FBI. The Justice Department acknowledged in October that the National Security Agency had gathered evidence against Muhtorov under a 2008 law that authorizes foreign intelligence surveillance without warrants, much of it on the Internet.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2014 | By David Lauter and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - The Affordable Care Act has passed its first big test, but the law's distribution of winners and losers all but guarantees the achievement will not quiet its political opposition. White House officials, who had a near-death experience with the law's rollout six months ago, were nearly giddy Tuesday as they celebrated an open-enrollment season that ended on a high note. Despite the early problems with the federal website, "7.1 million Americans have now signed up," President Obama declared in a Rose Garden speech to members of Congress, his staff and supporters in which he notably returned to referring to the law as "Obamacare.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Cities, counties and law enforcement officials across California are bristling at a 6-year-old law that they contend prevents regulation of massage parlors they suspect offer more than therapeutic bodywork. A profusion of massage parlors, often near schools and neighborhoods, creates blight, they complained at a legislative hearing. Local government officials told lawmakers last week that they're frustrated by a 2008 law that sought to regulate illicit massage parlors and support legitimate spas and other businesses.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
It's either a small fix to protect the free exercise of religion or a "no cake for gays" bill that would invite businesses to discriminate, depending on whom you talk to. The legislation,  SB 1062, would bolster a business owner's right to defend refusing service to someone when the owner believes doing so would violate their the practice and observance of religion. Supporters call it a "religious freedom" bill. As Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer weighs whether to sign the measure into law, here's a look at what the proposal is all about.  Why was SB 1062 proposed?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
Almost as soon as Matthew Hoff turned 18 and aged out of the mental health programs he'd been enrolled in since childhood, he was out on the streets and in and out of jail. His parents tried to get him back into treatment for bipolar and other brain disorders he suffers, but the young man wasn't cooperative and he wasn't considered dangerous or gravely disabled. So they stood by helplessly as their son faded from their reach. Less than a year later, Hoff walked into a Buena Park bank with a robbery note and left with a handful of cash.
OPINION
July 6, 2013 | By Rick Settersten
Our family exists at the crossroads of two of the most controversial aspects of American society - sexuality and race. We're two gay white men raising two black children - a girl, 13, and a boy, 10. Both children were adopted out of the foster care system as toddlers, and they both landed in that system because their birth mothers could not care for them. Each day we struggle with the legacies of their troubled beginnings, which gives us all the more joy as we see them thrive. Dan and I are a long-lived couple.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2011
Law 1: Never outshine the master. Law 14: Pose as a friend, work as a spy. Law 17: Keep others in suspended terror: Cultivate an air of unpredictability. Law 38: Think as you like but behave like others. Law 46: Never appear too perfect.
OPINION
April 6, 2014 | By Theshia Naidoo and Lynne Lyman
Jesse Snodgrass had recently transferred to Chaparral High School in Temecula and was feeling out of place and alone in 2012 when a boy named Dan, another newcomer, befriended him. Jesse, a 17-year-old autistic student, wasn't good at making friends and he was pleased by the overture. But there was something he didn't know about Dan: He was an undercover narcotics officer attending class at Chaparral hoping to bust student drug dealers. Dan quickly began exerting pressure on Jesse to sneak a pill from his parent's medicine cabinet or buy him some marijuana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | Kurt Streeter
Several of Southern California's most prominent religious leaders held a vigil for immigration reform in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, underscoring a growing interfaith effort to change the nation's laws. Immigrants who are in the United States illegally "need mercy and they need justice," said Archbishop Jose Gomez, welcoming an array of Christian, Jewish and Muslim leaders to the gathering at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. Gomez, who has made changing immigration laws a hallmark of his three-year tenure leading the L.A. Archdiocese, described the current system as "totally broken," adding that federal laws punished families and children unfairly.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
If you drive down Buckeye Road at the southern edge of Lima, Ohio, you'll pass an industrial complex where General Dynamics makes armored vehicles for the U.S. military. But if you stop and take a photograph, you just might find yourself detained by military police, have your camera confiscated and your digital photos deleted. Which is exactly what happened to two staffers for the Toledo Blade newspaper on Friday, in an unacceptable violation of the 1st Amendment and common sense. According to the Blade, staff writer Tyrel Linkhorn and photographer Jetta Fraser had just covered a news event at another Lima-area factory and decided to take photos of other businesses for future use, a common media practice.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
Even with 1.2 million people enrolled by Monday's deadline, California's health exchange isn't done adding to the Obamacare rolls - and it won't be for quite some time. In the months to come, it's estimated that several hundred thousand more Californians could qualify for a special enrollment period as college students graduate, families move and workers change jobs. But health insurers say the state's current rules for late sign-ups rely too much on the honor system and invite abuse by people waiting until they get sick.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Airline customers complain about being mistreated daily, but Rabbi S. Binyomin Ginsberg took his grievance all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Unfortunately for Ginsberg, the court sided Wednesday with Northwest Airlines Inc., now merged into Delta Air Lines Inc., in a case that had put carriers on edge. The ruling strengthens the industry's hand when fighting litigation filed by disgruntled passengers by bolstering a 36-year-old federal law that limits its exposure to such claims.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
TUNICA, Miss. - Marie Barnard was delighted when, after decades of silence on the topic, Mississippi passed a law requiring school districts to teach sex education. But the lesson involving the Peppermint Pattie wasn't what she had in mind for her sons. The curricula adopted by the school district in Oxford called on students to unwrap a piece of chocolate, pass it around class and observe how dirty it became. "They're using the Peppermint Pattie to show that a girl is no longer clean or valuable after she's had sex - that she's been used," said Barnard, who works in public health.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2010
'Outside the Law' MPAA rating: Not rated Running time: 2 hours, 18 minutes; French/Arabic with English subtitles Playing: In selected theaters
OPINION
June 13, 2013
Re "The Brown Act means what it says," Editorial, June 10 I applaud your fine editorial on the L.A. County Board of Supervisors' attempt, via AB 246, to do an end-run around our state's open meetings law, the Brown Act. The people aren't easily fooled. In meeting privately to discuss the state's prison realignment law with Gov. Jerry Brown in 2011, L.A. supervisors broke the law, plain and simple. Requesting that Assemblyman Steven Bradford (D-Gardena) write a bill granting them a "special" exception to the Brown Act shows a lack of respect for the people's right to know.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - Stung by criminal cases involving three state senators, Democratic legislative leaders vowed Tuesday to reassess their campaign finance practices, and canceled a lucrative golf fundraiser scheduled for this weekend. The promise of self-scrutiny among Senate Democrats was just one way last week's criminal complaint against Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) detailing public corruption and arms trafficking charges continues to reverberate through the Capitol. Also on Tuesday, federal agents were again present in a legislative office building, searching a room used by Yee as an overflow office, according to Senate workers.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2014 | By David Lauter and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - The Affordable Care Act has passed its first big test, but the law's distribution of winners and losers all but guarantees the achievement will not quiet its political opposition. White House officials, who had a near-death experience with the law's rollout six months ago, were nearly giddy Tuesday as they celebrated an open-enrollment season that ended on a high note. Despite the early problems with the federal website, "7.1 million Americans have now signed up," President Obama declared in a Rose Garden speech to members of Congress, his staff and supporters in which he notably returned to referring to the law as "Obamacare.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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