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BUSINESS
February 4, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel, This post has been updated. See below for details
NEW YORK -- Herbalife stock fell more than 6% after the New York Post reported the company was subject to an unspecified law-enforcement investigation. In early trading on Wall Street, Herbalife shares lost $2.25, or 6.42%, to $32.82. Herbalife's stock is off 44% from where it was a year ago. The Post cited documents the newspaper obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request from the Federal Trade Commission. According to the Post, the FTC cited "pending law-enforcement action" and withheld some information the Post requested about Herbalife.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 6, 2014 | By Theshia Naidoo and Lynne Lyman
Jesse Snodgrass had recently transferred to Chaparral High School in Temecula and was feeling out of place and alone in 2012 when a boy named Dan, another newcomer, befriended him. Jesse, a 17-year-old autistic student, wasn't good at making friends and he was pleased by the overture. But there was something he didn't know about Dan: He was an undercover narcotics officer attending class at Chaparral hoping to bust student drug dealers. Dan quickly began exerting pressure on Jesse to sneak a pill from his parent's medicine cabinet or buy him some marijuana.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1992 | PEGGY Y. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing a disturbing increase in gang activity, top Ventura County law-enforcement officials on Friday pledged to crack down on gangs like they never have before. At the county government center, the district attorney and police chiefs unveiled a master plan to unite police agencies throughout the county in a coordinated war against the growing gang problem. The Ventura County Gang Strategy, as the new effort is called, advocates a two-pronged approach to fighting gangs, Dist. Atty. Michael D.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
If you drive down Buckeye Road at the southern edge of Lima, Ohio, you'll pass an industrial complex where General Dynamics makes armored vehicles for the U.S. military. But if you stop and take a photograph, you just might find yourself detained by military police, have your camera confiscated and your digital photos deleted. Which is exactly what happened to two staffers for the Toledo Blade newspaper on Friday, in an unacceptable violation of the 1st Amendment and common sense. According to the Blade, staff writer Tyrel Linkhorn and photographer Jetta Fraser had just covered a news event at another Lima-area factory and decided to take photos of other businesses for future use, a common media practice.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
A system of federal "boot camps" to rehabilitate first-time drug offenders is being studied, drug czar William J. Bennett said Sunday. Bennett, whose formal title is national drug policy director, raised the subject of the need for more and different penal facilities for incarceration of users during an appearance on CBS' "Face the Nation." He had previously called for an intensified effort to lock up sellers of narcotics, possibly on ships and abandoned military stations, as part of his "war plan" against drugs.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an unexpected consequence of a gun control law that took effect Jan. 1, the names of people admitted for mental health treatment at California hospitals are being recorded in state law enforcement computers. Although meant to keep firearms away from those who are considered dangerous to themselves or to society, the practice also applies to psychiatric patients who voluntarily check themselves in for treatment and have no history of violent behavior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1994 | ERIC SLATER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Surrounded by sand, slathered in sunscreen and holding the coldest of beers in your hot hand, you are sprawled out and gulping down the California Dream. Until an ominous shadow blocks your sun, pours out your beer and hands you a $50 ticket. If Los Angeles beaches are known nationwide as the place to catch West Coast rays and a summer beer buzz, law enforcement officials are going out of their way to change half of that image.
WORLD
August 9, 2008 | Richard Marosi, Times Staff Writer
In Mexico's drug war, Gen. Sergio Aponte Polito racked up crime-fighting credentials worthy of the Dark Knight, making record seizures of drugs and weapons and forcing out top Baja California law enforcement officials he accused of corruption and of having links to organized crime.
OPINION
October 21, 2009
Today's topic: Where can you point to the Patriot Act's success in stopping terrorists? Wednesday through Friday, Jena Baker McNeill and Julian Sanchez discuss the Patriot Act, portions of which Congress is considering reauthorizing. Point: Jena Baker McNeill Three alleged terrorist plots have been foiled in recent weeks in three U.S. cities: Dallas, New York and Springfield, Ill. Officials say the cases involved men who, in separate plots, wanted to bomb a federal building, a subway and a skyscraper.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Monday met with police chiefs from around the country -- including three from communities affected by mass shootings -- as part of his effort to build support for the gun control measures he wants to push through Congress. At a morning meeting at the White House, Obama asked the law enforcement officials to put pressure on lawmakers to act on the measures he endorsed in the wake of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. “If law enforcement officials who are dealing with this stuff every single day can come to some basic consensus in terms of steps that we need to take, Congress is going to be paying attention to them and we'll be able to make progress,” Obama said.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By John Sandweg
President Obama recently directed Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson to examine U.S. immigration enforcement policies to see how the department can "conduct enforcement more humanely within the confines of the law. " The answer to the president's directive is surprisingly simple: Homeland Security's Immigration and Customs Enforcement division, known as ICE, should eliminate "non-criminal re-entrants and immigration fugitives" as a priority...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
Law enforcement agenices in Mendocino County and surrounding areas searched Wednesday for armed suspects who shot a deputy, media in Northern California reported. Mendocino County law enforcement officials closed Highway 1 near MacKerricher State Park by Fort Bragg in response to a police pursuit and officer-involved shooting, the Press Democrat  reported. Sheriff's officials did not divulge further information but said they would hold a press conference at 5 p.m. Wednesday in Fort Bragg, the newspaper said.
WORLD
March 18, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON -- A review of the emails and a search of a home flight simulator have found nothing so far to suggest the pilots on the missing plane purposely compromised the flight by diverting it away from Beijing, according to two U.S. law enforcement officials. “Nothing stuck out,” said one of the sources, who was briefed on the search conducted by Malaysian officials. He said authorities sought to find out whether the pilot, Zaharie Ahmad Shah, might have been training on the simulator, specifically how to turn off the transponders and other in-flight devices before the March 8 flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
An in-depth report that critiques the response of public safety agencies and airport officials to November's deadly shooting at Los Angeles International Airport will be released to the public Tuesday. The Los Angeles Board of Airport Commissioners, which sets policy for LAX, LA/Ontario International Airport and Van Nuys Airport, is scheduled to discuss the review during a special meeting that begins at noon. Earlier in the morning, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti is also scheduled to address the evaluation at a news conference.
OPINION
March 12, 2014 | Patt Morrison
At the top of the big whiteboard in his office, Andre Birotte Jr. has written "BHAGS," by which he means his aspirations as U.S. attorney for seven Southern California counties: "big hairy audacious goals. " He's already hit some audacious personal goals, this son of Haitian immigrants. He's made his way from the L.A. public defender's office to inspector general of the Los Angeles Police Department to private practice, and, since 2010, to chief of the most populous U.S. attorney's district in the nation.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2014 | By Jenny Deam
GOLDEN, Colo. - The instructions seemed simple enough: nine steps forward, heel to toe, a quick turnaround, then nine steps back. But for the guy swaying a bit as he walked, his face slack, his eyes half closed, it was all too much. He made the nine steps forward and stopped, forgetting what came next. "Wait. What?" Colorado State Trooper Jason Morales dutifully marked it down in his report, just as he had a few minutes earlier when the suspect closed his eyes and tilted his head back to guess the passage of 30 seconds.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON -- A smartphone application that allows people to report law enforcement abuse in Arizona directly to the American Civil Liberties Union has gained instant popularity, with 3,000 people downloading the application in the first week of its launch. The application is meant to focus on recording stories of racial profiling associated with Arizona's controversial immigration enforcement law, known as SB 1070 . Since the ACLU unveiled the app on June 18, it has reported that at least 3,243 people have downloaded it -- mostly on Droid phones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1991
Regarding the LAPD--and others--the least we can do is stop calling them "peace" officers. CAL HALL Escondido
BUSINESS
March 9, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California lawmakers for years have been battling ravenous metal thieves, who pull copper wires out of street lights, grab rebar from construction sites, and steal pumps and other costly equipment from farmers' fields. Now, a bipartisan group of legislators led by Assemblyman Brian Nestande (R-Palm Desert), is trying to put more manpower and money into the fight. Nestande's bill, AB 2313, would create a metal theft task force within the attorney general's office that would provide grants to local police and prosecutors.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
It looks like the U.S. Border Patrol has opted for a policy of common sense. As The Times editorial page wrote last week , and the news pages documented earlier , federal agents patrolling the Mexican border have been involved in dozens of confrontations in which agents stepped in front of moving cars as a pretext to open fire in self-defense, and also responded to rocks thrown at them across the border with deadly fire. Border Patrol chief Michael J. Fisher on Friday told his agents to knock it off, though not in so many words.
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