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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1995 | JEFF KASS and GEOFF BOUCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Ana police and federal agents are teaming up to track guns used by criminals and to disrupt the illicit networks that supply weapons in the city and beyond. Using a $350,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice, Santa Ana police will take the lead in tracing guns linked to gang members and drug dealers. On Monday, the City Council unanimously approved the program, which is expected to be in place by the first of the year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2001 | NOAKI SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Department of Justice agreed Thursday to drop restrictions placed on a $133-million federal grant to hire additional police officers, allowing Los Angeles to put some of the money to use immediately for reform of the troubled LAPD. "Between this year and next we'll hire between 500 and 600 officers," said Jennifer Roth, deputy mayor for budget and policy, adding that the grant would pay for 90% of the new hires' salaries and benefits for three years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after Los Angeles police brass said detectives sometimes botch homicide cases because they are overworked and swamped with paper, the federal government Wednesday announced a $14.6-million grant that could put 219 more officers on the city's streets and fund a variety of technology improvements. The latest infusion of cash from the Clinton administration comes on top of $127 million that the Los Angeles Police Department has received over the past four years to expand its ranks.
NEWS
June 16, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's sprawling Central Valley, long renowned for its agriculture business, earned a new and more dubious distinction Tuesday from federal authorities: the "epicenter" of the nation's growing methamphetamine industry. Mexican-controlled methamphetamine "super labs" have grown so prevalent in the valley that the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy has named a nine-county region there one of five "high-intensity" trafficking zones in need of special attention.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new domestic drug control strategy to be announced by President Bush Thursday will designate Los Angeles County, Houston, Miami, New York and the U.S.-Mexican border as high-intensity drug trafficking centers eligible for special aid, according to Administration and congressional officials. The designation of high-intensity regions, including the border area from San Diego to Brownsville, Tex., is one element of the Administration's drug control plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2001 | NOAKI SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Department of Justice agreed Thursday to drop restrictions placed on a $133-million federal grant to hire additional police officers, allowing Los Angeles to put some of the money to use immediately for reform of the troubled LAPD. "Between this year and next we'll hire between 500 and 600 officers," said Jennifer Roth, deputy mayor for budget and policy, adding that the grant would pay for 90% of the new hires' salaries and benefits for three years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1996 | JEFF KASS
The Police Department estimates it will gain the equivalent of 55 new patrol officers through the use of new time-saving computers purchased with the help of a $1.8-million federal grant, along with the redeployment of sworn officers now in administrative positions, officials said Tuesday. The money comes from the U.S. Justice Department's COPS MORE grant program, part of the 1994 crime bill aimed at swelling the ranks of police officers on the street by 100,000 by the year 2000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1996 | JOHN POPE
The City Council Monday will consider allocating about $200,000 in state and federal grants to the gang suppression unit, which would make the pilot operation a semi-permanent fixture, officials said Friday. In June, the City Council allocated $20,000 to fund a special police unit to track and combat gang activity for six months. City officials said that the team has been so effective, they would like to use recent law enforcement grants to make the unit more permanent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1995
The Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday approved a plan to use $18.3 million in anticipated federal funds to upgrade the department's 1960s-vintage technology to state of the art. "As technology increases and improves, we'll become more efficient," Chief Willie L. Williams said. "That translates into more personnel that can be utilized specifically for uniform field operations, for investigatory operations."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, delivering some badly needed good news for the Los Angeles Police Department, announced Thursday that it was awarding the city more than $48 million, enough to pay for 643 new police officers. Noting that the grant represents the largest single federal funding award in LAPD history, Mayor Richard Riordan said the city competed with more than 1,000 municipalities for a chunk of the funds set aside in 1994's sweeping federal anti-crime legislation.
NEWS
March 14, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton expressed alarm Saturday about recent allegations of police brutality and called for increased funding for programs designed to improve community policing, train officers in ethics and restore public trust in law enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after a new criminal justice block grant program took effect, city and county officials have finally agreed how to spend the $43 million in federal funds. With much fanfare, the local officials announced Monday what they called a historic arrangement allowing them to overcome years of often bitter political and law enforcement rivalries and work together in spending the money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1997 | JOHN CANALIS
Five Orange County police departments--Buena Park, Fountain Valley, Irvine, La Habra and Westminster--will share $797,000 in federal grants aimed at upgrading computers and freeing officers from administrative duties so they can spend more time patrolling the streets. The program, now in its third year, gives agencies money to hire civilian employees as administrators, freeing officers for patrols and community-oriented service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after Los Angeles police brass said detectives sometimes botch homicide cases because they are overworked and swamped with paper, the federal government Wednesday announced a $14.6-million grant that could put 219 more officers on the city's streets and fund a variety of technology improvements. The latest infusion of cash from the Clinton administration comes on top of $127 million that the Los Angeles Police Department has received over the past four years to expand its ranks.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This Texas city took account of something that many other cities did not: that a much ballyhooed federal program to put 100,000 more police officers on the beat nationwide would stop paying the costs after just three years. So, soon after signing up for the program, city officials rounded up enough money to make sure the new officers would not just vanish when the three years were up. In fact, they helped pass a half-cent sales tax to hire even more police officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1996 | JEFF KASS
Under a federal grant of almost $1 million, a coalition of local law enforcement agencies has expanded the city's Street Terrorist Offender Project. The 12-month, $926,561 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice will pay for a deputy district attorney, a district attorney investigator, a probation officer and two Santa Ana police officers assigned to gang investigations, Police Capt. Dan McCoy said Thursday. Some of the money also will go to studies on the effectiveness of STOP efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after a new criminal justice block grant program took effect, city and county officials have finally agreed how to spend the $43 million in federal funds. With much fanfare, the local officials announced Monday what they called a historic arrangement allowing them to overcome years of often bitter political and law enforcement rivalries and work together in spending the money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1993 | MIMI KO
The City Council has given Police Chief Daryl Wicker permission to apply for a federal grant that would add four patrol officers to the force. Wicker said the grant, known as the Police Hiring Supplement Program, would pay 50% of the salaries of the four officers for three years. Cypress would have to foot the bill for the other 50%, but the city has a few months to determine whether that is feasible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1996 | HOPE HAMASHIGE and JOHN POPE
About $200,000 in recent state and federal law-enforcement grants will be used to hire a sergeant and two police officers to replace those deployed to the city's gang unit, the City Council decided this week. The funding will make the pilot gang unit a semi-permanent fixture, officials said. In June, the council approved $20,000 for police overtime pay, which allowed three officers to exclusively target the city's 15 street gangs, which have an estimated 500 members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1996 | JEFF KASS
The Police Department estimates it will gain the equivalent of 55 new patrol officers through the use of new time-saving computers purchased with the help of a $1.8-million federal grant, along with the redeployment of sworn officers now in administrative positions, officials said Tuesday. The money comes from the U.S. Justice Department's COPS MORE grant program, part of the 1994 crime bill aimed at swelling the ranks of police officers on the street by 100,000 by the year 2000.
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