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Law Enforcement Agencies Suits

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NEWS
May 21, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From personal experience, Louis E. Katona III says, he knows exactly what the National Rifle Assn. means when it calls the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms a renegade agency of "jackbooted government thugs." On May 8, 1992, Katona contends, his home in Bucyrus, Ohio, was invaded by three overzealous, foulmouthed ATF agents who wrongfully seized his valuable weapons collection and then assaulted his wife, causing the death of their unborn child.
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NEWS
August 23, 2000 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of a deal that set him free after 2 1/2 years of behind bars, Arthur Carmona and his attorneys signed a pact at the request of prosecutors stating that his earlier conviction on robbery charges was not the result of misconduct by police or the district attorney. Legal experts said Tuesday that the pact clearly weakens any lawsuit Carmona might file against authorities, but some still believe he might be able to receive some compensation for his incarceration.
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NEWS
August 23, 2000 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of a deal that set him free after 2 1/2 years of behind bars, Arthur Carmona and his attorneys signed a pact at the request of prosecutors stating that his earlier conviction on robbery charges was not the result of misconduct by police or the district attorney. Legal experts said Tuesday that the pact clearly weakens any lawsuit Carmona might file against authorities, but some still believe he might be able to receive some compensation for his incarceration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1999 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time they stopped firing, Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies, Hawthorne police and California Highway Patrol officers had shot Michael William Arnold 106 times. Arnold, 39, was struck seven times in the head and neck, 50 times in the torso and dozens of times in other parts of his body. An autopsy found that at least 55 of the wounds were serious enough to be fatal.
NEWS
February 9, 1987
Field training programs for police recruits can reduce the number of suits against law enforcement agencies, a new report said. The study, prepared for the Justice Department's National Institute of Justice, found that 105 of 288 police departments surveyed did not have field training programs. However, of the 183 agencies that did have field training, 30%, or 54 departments, reported fewer civil liability complaints as a result of the programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1995
A black motorist who says he was assaulted by a Beverly Hills police officer in 1994 joined a federal civil rights lawsuit filed recently by six young men who allege that were victims of a Police Department policy that targets African American men for traffic stops. Littlerock resident Richard Hill, 52, says he suffered injuries to his groin when a police officer frisked him in a July 29 incident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1996 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine police officers routinely coerce drunk-driving suspects into taking a blood test to measure alcohol content and disregard their right to take a urine or breath test instead, according to a class-action lawsuit filed against the city and police officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1993 | KENNETH REICH and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An array of civil rights organizations filed a federal lawsuit Thursday against the Anti-Defamation League and law enforcement authorities in Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego, asking for an injunction against spying and damages for alleged privacy violations. Groups representing Arab-Americans and African-Americans led the effort, along with other organizations. Joining in the suit were former Lt. Gov.
NEWS
December 28, 1998 | From Associated Press
A Sparks police officer, who is suing the city on charges that he was passed over for a promotion because he is black, has filed a court motion seeking his immediate promotion. The motion for a preliminary injunction, filed Thursday in Reno federal court, claims that Melvin Gentry should be promoted to sergeant now because a delay while the lawsuit moves forward would irreparably harm his career. Sparks City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1991 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of a Sylmar security company filed an $11-million lawsuit Tuesday charging that he was repeatedly denied a permit to carry a concealed weapon because authorities conspire to grant few permits, and those go only to applicants who are celebrities or political favorites. Douglas Ray Hickman said he has been turned down numerous times for a permit despite his sometimes dangerous work.
NEWS
December 28, 1998 | From Associated Press
A Sparks police officer, who is suing the city on charges that he was passed over for a promotion because he is black, has filed a court motion seeking his immediate promotion. The motion for a preliminary injunction, filed Thursday in Reno federal court, claims that Melvin Gentry should be promoted to sergeant now because a delay while the lawsuit moves forward would irreparably harm his career. Sparks City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1996 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine police officers routinely coerce drunk-driving suspects into taking a blood test to measure alcohol content and disregard their right to take a urine or breath test instead, according to a class-action lawsuit filed against the city and police officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1995
A black motorist who says he was assaulted by a Beverly Hills police officer in 1994 joined a federal civil rights lawsuit filed recently by six young men who allege that were victims of a Police Department policy that targets African American men for traffic stops. Littlerock resident Richard Hill, 52, says he suffered injuries to his groin when a police officer frisked him in a July 29 incident.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From personal experience, Louis E. Katona III says, he knows exactly what the National Rifle Assn. means when it calls the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms a renegade agency of "jackbooted government thugs." On May 8, 1992, Katona contends, his home in Bucyrus, Ohio, was invaded by three overzealous, foulmouthed ATF agents who wrongfully seized his valuable weapons collection and then assaulted his wife, causing the death of their unborn child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1993 | KENNETH REICH and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An array of civil rights organizations filed a federal lawsuit Thursday against the Anti-Defamation League and law enforcement authorities in Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego, asking for an injunction against spying and damages for alleged privacy violations. Groups representing Arab-Americans and African-Americans led the effort, along with other organizations. Joining in the suit were former Lt. Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1991 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of a Sylmar security company filed an $11-million lawsuit Tuesday charging that he was repeatedly denied a permit to carry a concealed weapon because authorities conspire to grant few permits, and those go only to applicants who are celebrities or political favorites. Douglas Ray Hickman said he has been turned down numerous times for a permit despite his sometimes dangerous work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1999 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time they stopped firing, Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies, Hawthorne police and California Highway Patrol officers had shot Michael William Arnold 106 times. Arnold, 39, was struck seven times in the head and neck, 50 times in the torso and dozens of times in other parts of his body. An autopsy found that at least 55 of the wounds were serious enough to be fatal.
NEWS
February 9, 1987
Field training programs for police recruits can reduce the number of suits against law enforcement agencies, a new report said. The study, prepared for the Justice Department's National Institute of Justice, found that 105 of 288 police departments surveyed did not have field training programs. However, of the 183 agencies that did have field training, 30%, or 54 departments, reported fewer civil liability complaints as a result of the programs.
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