Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLaw Enforcement Agents
IN THE NEWS

Law Enforcement Agents

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2000 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The surgeon questioned last week in connection with the attempted murder of an Irvine businessman remained hospitalized in stable condition Monday after suffering chest pains. Dr. Jerry D. Nilsson was escorted to Western Medical Center in Anaheim on Friday evening by federal law enforcement agents. He had just undergone several hours of questioning about the shooting on Feb. 28 of Biofem Inc. Chief Executive Officer James Patrick Riley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2011 | By Bill Kisliuk, Los Angeles Times
Facing a protest by Occupy demonstrators, Pasadena police will bolster their already robust presence at the 2012 Rose Parade. Pasadena police and Tournament of Roses officials have been negotiating with Occupy forces for several weeks on a plan that they hope will prevent any disruptions to Monday's parade. Pasadena officials are allowing the Occupy group to march on the parade route after all the official floats have passed. Protesters intend to march with large banners that decry wealth inequality in the United States and to unveil a few colorful "floats" of their own, including a giant people-powered octopus, said Pete Thottam, an Occupy spokesman.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 28, 1999 | From the Washington Post
The Federal Communications Commission on Friday approved a series of telephone industry standards aimed at bringing law enforcement wiretaps into the Digital Age, to the displeasure of groups that see a threat to privacy rights. The FCC order will require telecommunications companies to provide six of nine new surveillance capabilities that have been on the "wish list" of the Justice Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
NATIONAL
November 30, 2010 | By Bob Drogin and April Choi, Los Angeles Times
Terrorism suspect Mohamed Osman Mohamud pleaded not guilty Monday to a federal charge of trying to explode a car bomb at a crowded holiday celebration last week in Portland, Ore., and his lawyers suggested that he was entrapped by the FBI. The 19-year-old Somali American at the center of the latest allegation of homegrown terrorism said, "Yes, your honor," in a soft tone when U.S. Magistrate Judge John V. Acosta asked if he understood his rights....
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court today bolstered the fight against international drug trafficking and terrorism by giving U.S. law-enforcement agents more power to conduct searches in foreign countries. By a 6-3 vote, the justices said U.S. agents did not need a court warrant to search the home of a suspected Mexican drug smuggler later convicted in the killing of a federal drug agent. The ruling gives U.S. law-enforcement officials broad authority to conduct warrantless searches abroad of non-U.S. citizens.
NEWS
September 21, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The proposal to extend the FBI's reach in tapping phones and computers does little more than bring the law up to date in a world of wireless phones and the Internet, say former officials who served under presidents from Ronald Reagan to Bill Clinton. "How many people today have just one phone attached to one address," so that a single wiretap can catch all of a suspect's calls asked Stewart Baker, Clinton's general counsel for the National Security Agency.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2002 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of Web sites offering pirated movies, games and other goodies have adopted a curious line of defense: a start-up page that tells law enforcement agents they're not allowed to look inside. With a few words changed here or there, the same "disclaimer" is popping up on Internet sites hawking items ranging from replicas of designer sunglasses to instructions for stealing satellite TV signals.
NATIONAL
November 30, 2010 | By Bob Drogin and April Choi, Los Angeles Times
Terrorism suspect Mohamed Osman Mohamud pleaded not guilty Monday to a federal charge of trying to explode a car bomb at a crowded holiday celebration last week in Portland, Ore., and his lawyers suggested that he was entrapped by the FBI. The 19-year-old Somali American at the center of the latest allegation of homegrown terrorism said, "Yes, your honor," in a soft tone when U.S. Magistrate Judge John V. Acosta asked if he understood his rights....
NEWS
December 24, 1999 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Banks are not only watching their customers more closely these days. They're telling on them, too. In an attempt to combat money laundering, a little-known federal law has turned U.S. banks into an army of secret government agents. Each year, banks are reporting tens of thousands of their customers as suspected criminals to law enforcement agencies. In most cases, customers never learn that their names and private financial information have been disclosed.
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An internal review by the U.S. Border Patrol into allegations of abuse surrounding the recent roundup of 216 illegal immigrants in Orange has concluded that agents "acted in good faith, and their conduct was within the bounds of law," a spokesman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2009 | Maria L. LaGanga and My-Thuan Tran
For years, neighbors knew something was off about Phillip Garrido, the registered sex offender now accused of abducting an 11-year-old girl and holding her for 18 years, much of the time in an overgrown backyard filled with sheds and tents. One neighbor even called 911, worried about children living in the yard. Authorities regularly visited Garrido's home in Antioch, northeast of Oakland, but never detected the presence of Jaycee Lee Dugard, whom Garrido allegedly kidnapped in 1991, or the two blond, blue-eyed girls officials say she bore him during her captivity.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2006 | Nicole Gaouette, Times Staff Writer
Even as prospects for a sweeping overhaul of immigration policy remain in doubt, Congress is moving on other fronts to bolster security along the border with Mexico and to toughen enforcement against illegal immigrants already in the United States. The latest steps came Thursday with the Senate's approval, 100-0, of a $32.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2003 | Jia-Rui Chong and Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writers
A two-year investigation led Wednesday to the arrests of 57 Hells Angels members and associates in five Western states on suspicion of firearms violations, narcotics trafficking, possession of stolen explosives and organized criminal activity.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2002 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of Web sites offering pirated movies, games and other goodies have adopted a curious line of defense: a start-up page that tells law enforcement agents they're not allowed to look inside. With a few words changed here or there, the same "disclaimer" is popping up on Internet sites hawking items ranging from replicas of designer sunglasses to instructions for stealing satellite TV signals.
NEWS
September 21, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The proposal to extend the FBI's reach in tapping phones and computers does little more than bring the law up to date in a world of wireless phones and the Internet, say former officials who served under presidents from Ronald Reagan to Bill Clinton. "How many people today have just one phone attached to one address," so that a single wiretap can catch all of a suspect's calls asked Stewart Baker, Clinton's general counsel for the National Security Agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2001 | JULIE WATSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With exhibits of bottled crack cocaine, a marijuana-filled turnover and a photo of a woman's cocaine-implanted buttocks, Maj. Cipriano Cruz doesn't doubt his museum could attract visitors. He just doesn't know if he wants to open it to the public. For 15 years, the Defense Ministry has been home to what is being touted as one of Mexico City's most intriguing, if secret, exhibitions: Its "Narco Museum."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1990 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Immigration and Naturalization Service agent charged with abducting and raping a Latina is a suspect in several other rapes, according to authorities who asked Wednesday for other possible victims to come forward. Los Angeles police said they will seek additional charges against James Edward Riley, 32, of Reseda as early as today. "We have talked to several victims," Lt. Dennis Dunn said. "We think there may be more." Riley, 32, was arrested at 4:30 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1995 | GREG HERNANDEZ and ALAN EYERLY
Determined to place an Immigration and Naturalization Service agent at the city jail, the City Council on Tuesday unanimously voted to pay the cost with city money if they can't get federal funding within 60 days. "I think this is a pragmatic solution to the debate of whether or not the federal government should pay for it or the local cities," said Councilman Bob Zemel, who has led the effort to try the idea for six months at a cost of $37,500.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2000 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The surgeon questioned last week in connection with the attempted murder of an Irvine businessman remained hospitalized in stable condition Monday after suffering chest pains. Dr. Jerry D. Nilsson was escorted to Western Medical Center in Anaheim on Friday evening by federal law enforcement agents. He had just undergone several hours of questioning about the shooting on Feb. 28 of Biofem Inc. Chief Executive Officer James Patrick Riley.
NEWS
December 24, 1999 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Banks are not only watching their customers more closely these days. They're telling on them, too. In an attempt to combat money laundering, a little-known federal law has turned U.S. banks into an army of secret government agents. Each year, banks are reporting tens of thousands of their customers as suspected criminals to law enforcement agencies. In most cases, customers never learn that their names and private financial information have been disclosed.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|