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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1992
Police groups from around the country prepared to take their campaign against rapper Ice-T's "Cop Killer" song directly to Time Warner Inc. shareholders today, after senior company officials on Wednesday rebuffed the latest effort to stop the song's distribution. "They won't give in. We won't give up," said Memphis Police Lt. Brenda Maples, president of the Law Enforcement Alliance of America, after an hourlong meeting with Time Warner executives Martin D. Payson and Tod R. Hullin.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1992
Police groups from around the country prepared to take their campaign against rapper Ice-T's "Cop Killer" song directly to Time Warner Inc. shareholders today, after senior company officials on Wednesday rebuffed the latest effort to stop the song's distribution. "They won't give in. We won't give up," said Memphis Police Lt. Brenda Maples, president of the Law Enforcement Alliance of America, after an hourlong meeting with Time Warner executives Martin D. Payson and Tod R. Hullin.
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BUSINESS
July 15, 1992 | KATHRYN HARRIS
Police organizations opposed to Time Warner's release of the controversial rap song "Cop Killer" will hold their first march today, a day in advance of the company's annual shareholders meeting. The Beverly Hills rally is being organized by the Law Enforcement Alliance of America, a Falls Church, Va., organization affiliated with two California groups: The California Correctional Peace Officers Assn. and Crime Victims United.
NEWS
July 6, 1996 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The headline of a recent press release from Rep. Elton Gallegly (R-Simi Valley) makes a bold claim: "Nation's Largest Coalition of Law Enforcement Officers Strongly Endorses Gallegly Education Amendment." Actually, virtually every major police organization, including the nation's largest, has opposed Gallegly's proposal to allow states to ban illegal immigrant children from public schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2001 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California affiliate of the National Rifle Assn., a county prosecutor, gun dealers and a national police organization sued Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer on Tuesday, accusing him of making the state's recently strengthened assault gun law "incomprehensible and unenforceable."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1997 | LEE HARRIS
Here's the rundown on guests and topics for the weekend's public-affairs programs: Today "Saturday Journal": Sandra Sobcraj, Associated Press; author David Sacks ("Diversity Myth"); Rick Miller, Department of Education; Kenan Pollack, U.S. News & World Report, 5 a.m. C-SPAN. "Today": Blood, Sweat and Tears; home electrical repairs; returning to high school; chocolate mousse; 40 most fascinating television personalities, 6 a.m. (4)(36).
NEWS
February 11, 1994 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Hockey League officials Thursday praised the Mighty Ducks organization for joining the gun-exchange movement and said the team's program should be adopted throughout the league. "We applaud the Ducks for jumping in there and being the first team to do this," said Bernadette Mansur, an NHL spokeswoman. "If it's a good idea, like this one, it should be for everybody." And the Los Angeles Kings are doing just that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1995 | DAVID FOSTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Yes, he's a convicted murderer. Yes, he's a big, muscular guy. Yes, the barbells he hefts each day in a prison gym make him even bigger and stronger. But inmate Paul Douglas Crawford sees no reason for people to consider him a menace--nor any reason to ban weightlifting in prisons, as some lawmakers in Congress and several states are suggesting. "This isn't about violence," said Crawford, taking a breather during a recent weightlifting competition at the Clallam Bay Corrections Center.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1992 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The notion of a Time Warner annual meeting without Chairman Steven J. Ross sends a shiver down the spine of some shareholders. But with the charismatic chief sidelined by prostate cancer, Time Warner executives may be privately relieved that a sideshow has materialized to distract those attending the annual gathering Thursday in Beverly Hills. Far easier to grapple with the First Amendment issues raised by the company's distribution of the controversial "Cop Killer" song than Ross' mortality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1997 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The joke among some in law enforcement is that the West Covina Police Department is just a front for a $1-million-a-year computer business. In a novel enterprise, the department sells law enforcement-related software and data management services to three dozen agencies in the West. The department--the only known law enforcement agency to hawk computer services--saves City Hall a half-million dollars a year. "We built a better mousetrap, and everyone who sees it wants it," said Cmdr.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2005 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court abolished the death penalty for juveniles Tuesday, ruling that it was excessive and cruel to execute a person who was under 18 when the crime was committed. Juveniles are less mature than adults and, no matter how heinous their crimes, they are not among "the worst offenders" who deserve to die, the 5-4 majority said.
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