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NEWS
March 2, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton ruled Friday that Mexico is cooperating fully with U.S. counter-narcotics efforts, despite a State Department report that called Mexico the most "immediate narcotics threat to the United States" and cited widespread police and judicial corruption. At the same time, Clinton determined that Colombia's government and congress are so riddled with graft that the country falls short of global antidrug standards, a finding that bars U.S.
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NEWS
March 2, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton ruled Friday that Mexico is cooperating fully with U.S. counter-narcotics efforts, despite a State Department report that called Mexico the most "immediate narcotics threat to the United States" and cited widespread police and judicial corruption. At the same time, Clinton determined that Colombia's government and congress are so riddled with graft that the country falls short of global antidrug standards, a finding that bars U.S.
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NEWS
March 1, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the week leading up to the deadline today for the Clinton administration to certify the progress of key nations in the global war on drugs, Mexico's stock market plunged, its frustration soared and its rhetoric seethed with nationalist pique. "The Mexican government does not recognize any legitimacy to the 'process of certification,' " declared Jorge Pinto, Mexico's consul general in New York. And Mexican Health Secretary Dr.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the week leading up to the deadline today for the Clinton administration to certify the progress of key nations in the global war on drugs, Mexico's stock market plunged, its frustration soared and its rhetoric seethed with nationalist pique. "The Mexican government does not recognize any legitimacy to the 'process of certification,' " declared Jorge Pinto, Mexico's consul general in New York. And Mexican Health Secretary Dr.
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week before President Clinton is to decide whether Mexico is cooperating in anti-narcotics efforts, a Mexican official warned here Thursday that anything less than a full endorsement will damage his country's ability to work with U.S. law enforcement agencies. Juan Rebolledo, Mexico's foreign relations undersecretary, said the worst possible outcome would be if the United States declares that it is not fully satisfied with Mexico's anti-drug actions but believes that U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1987 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Complaining about the vagueness of corruption charges leveled by U.S. law enforcement, Mexico's attorney general has asked the American government for more information concerning allegations by the Drug Enforcement Administration that a Mexican supreme court justice was bribed by a reputed drug kingpin. Atty. Gen. Sergio Garcia Ramirez made the request Friday in a letter to Charles L. Pilliod Jr., the U.S. ambassador to Mexico.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
Mexican President Felipe Calderon on Monday pushed for a revival of a ban on assault weapons in the U.S., arguing that the ban's expiration has led to the spread of guns across the border and a spike in violence in Mexico. “The expiring of the assault weapons ban in the year 2004 coincided almost exactly with the beginning of the harshest -- the harshest -- period of violence we've ever seen,” Calderon said, through an interpreter, at a White House press conference on Monday.
OPINION
June 8, 2005
Just as surely as the sky is blue, law enforcement in Mexico is corrupt. That assumption may too often be true, but it is incomplete. A federal sting that exposed surprising openness to bribery among U.S. soldiers and law enforcement officers on the U.S.-Mexico border ought to turn on a light bulb. Recent stories by The Times' Ralph Vartabedian showed that Army National Guard Humvees were used to deliver hundreds of pounds of cocaine to an Arizona hotel.
OPINION
December 8, 2008
Conflicts in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan will demand President Obama's attention as soon as he takes office, but he also must make time for the war on our border, where the Mexican government is fighting narcotics traffickers. Drug violence has claimed more than 6,800 lives in Mexico in the last two years, and has seeped into scores of U.S. cities that are marketplaces for illegal drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2007 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Rodrigo Avila-Aviles came to Los Angeles from El Salvador this week to discuss an export-import problem that has nothing to do with tariffs or quotas. As director general of the El Salvador National Civil Police, Avila-Aviles is here to talk to the FBI about what can be done about the number of gang members moving back and forth between Central America and the United States. Once here, they learn new ways to menace neighborhoods before they are deported, the director general said.
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week before President Clinton is to decide whether Mexico is cooperating in anti-narcotics efforts, a Mexican official warned here Thursday that anything less than a full endorsement will damage his country's ability to work with U.S. law enforcement agencies. Juan Rebolledo, Mexico's foreign relations undersecretary, said the worst possible outcome would be if the United States declares that it is not fully satisfied with Mexico's anti-drug actions but believes that U.S.
NEWS
March 22, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At age 18, Gerardo Mendoza has already served three years in the Mexican Army. The baby-faced private spent most of it in the mountains--burning marijuana fields, chasing drug smugglers and running counterinsurgency operations in the southernmost state of Chiapas.
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