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Law Enforcement Officers Labor Relations

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1997
Forty-one Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies who provide security in Pasadena, Burbank, Glendale and Los Angeles courthouses called in sick Monday as the union representing deputies urged county officials to resume contract negotiations. A sheriff's spokesman said that the vacancies caused by Monday's sickout were filled by other court services personnel. The job action followed three similar sickouts last week at several Los Angeles County courthouses and jail facilities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1992 | JODY WILGOREN
Police Department employees on Thursday unanimously rejected the city's latest contract offer and declared an impasse in negotiations over wages, scheduling and benefits. The police, who have been working without a contract since July, are among two of Newport Beach's six employee groups that have yet to sign agreements with the city. The Newport Beach Employees' League, which represents blue-collar workers, filed suit against the city Monday to demand a wage increase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1993
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge on Thursday kept in place an order that prevents Los Angeles police officers from using a work disruption or "blue flu" in an attempt to win wage concessions from the city. Citing state laws that prohibit job actions that could endanger public safety, Judge Robert H. O'Brien granted a preliminary injunction, extending the ban he issued late last month on officers initiating a massive sickout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1993 | MIMI KO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About 150 police officers, their families and city residents picketed outside a City Council meeting Monday night, protesting the city manager's recent 15% pay raise and demanding that public safety be made a top priority. In the city's first-ever picketing by police, members of the Cypress Public Safety Employees Assn. said they want city officials to act in "good faith" in contract negotiations and grant an unspecified pay increase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997
More than three dozen sheriff's deputies who provide security at several Westside courthouses called in sick on Thursday, continuing a work action aimed at pressuring county officials to come up with more money at the bargaining table. According to sheriff's officials, calling in sick were 15 of 21 deputies at the West Los Angeles Court, 18 of 30 deputies at the Santa Monica Court and all four deputies at the Malibu Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Escalating the war of words with his officers' union, Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks on Tuesday called the Police Protective League's directors "nine tired old men" who are out of touch with their members. "They're dated and stuck in a time warp," Parks told reporters after a regularly scheduled meeting with his Police Commission bosses. "Really, they are an embarrassment."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1994
Los Angeles police commanders this week began interviewing officers who participated in last week's mass sickout but the police union said it prepared officers so they would not incriminate themselves. At the request of Chief Willie L. Williams, the LAPD prepared a list of questions for officers, including one that bluntly asked whether they were in fact sick when they failed to report to work during the "blue flu."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1994 | BRIAN RAY BALLOU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-six Orange County sheriff's deputies participated in a "blue flu" job action Thursday, marking the second time in as many weeks that officers have called in sick to protest an eight-month-long contract dispute over wages and benefits. This time, 20 deputies and two sergeants from the central men's jail and 11 investigators, two deputies and one sergeant from the professional standards division called in sick. The sick-out by jail officers on the 10:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
NEWS
November 23, 1993 | JIM NEWTON and NIESON HIMMEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Acting in apparent response to their union's strategy for pressuring the city into a pay raise, small but higher than usual numbers of Los Angeles police officers began calling in sick late Monday night, kicking off a two-day "blue flu." In anticipation of the sickout, the Police Department's top command called a modified tactical alert, keeping Monday night-shift officers on duty at the end of their shifts until further notice.
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