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March 20, 1993 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inglewood Police Sgt. Donald Fry was sitting in his squad car, its engine running, making a notation in his log book when a man wearing a parka and blue jeans appeared out of the darkness. "How you doing?" the man asked. He took another step toward the squad car and then suddenly whirled around, pulled a small semiautomatic pistol from his pocket and fired at Fry. The sound was deafening, echoing in the squad car like an enormous thunderclap.
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NEWS
July 14, 1997 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, Border Patrol agent Angel Pena's biggest fear was tumbling down a deep ravine in the dark. These days he worries about getting shot. Snipers have shot at U.S. agents seven times in the past eight weeks, U.S. officials say. No one has been killed, but agents are now being watched over by specially trained Border Patrol sentries armed with M-16 assault rifles and ready to return fire.
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NEWS
March 14, 1994 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No cop joins the force thinking it will happen to him or her. But in the past year, nine law enforcement officers in Southern California have been slain in the line of duty. Among the most recent: Martin Ganz, a Manhattan Beach police officer and former Buena Park Police Department Explorer Scout, and Christy Lynne Hamilton, a Los Angeles Police Department rookie.
NEWS
March 14, 1994 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No cop joins the force thinking it will happen to him or her. But in the past year, nine law enforcement officers in Southern California have been slain in the line of duty. Among the most recent: Martin Ganz, a Manhattan Beach police officer and former Buena Park Police Department Explorer Scout, and Christy Lynne Hamilton, a Los Angeles Police Department rookie.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Sixteen permanent, high-intensity lights have been installed along the Tia Juana River levee to provide more protection for U.S. Border Patrol agents and illegal aliens. They also will help agents find and arrest undocumented aliens, who often are attacked in the rugged area which is a popular spot for illegal entry into the United States, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1993 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wider use of pepper spray on individuals who resist police officers was approved Tuesday on a 3-2 vote by the Los Angeles Police Commission, which acted over its chairman's objection that more study was needed on the spray's effects at the present level of use.
NEWS
July 14, 1997 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, Border Patrol agent Angel Pena's biggest fear was tumbling down a deep ravine in the dark. These days he worries about getting shot. Snipers have shot at U.S. agents seven times in the past eight weeks, U.S. officials say. No one has been killed, but agents are now being watched over by specially trained Border Patrol sentries armed with M-16 assault rifles and ready to return fire.
NEWS
April 22, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State and local law enforcement agencies throughout California are searching employee records to determine if any of their officers are on the wrong side of a wide-ranging new gun-control law that could cost them their weapons and even their jobs. At issue is a provision of the statute that prohibits purchase or ownership of a firearm for 10 years by anyone with a history of certain misdemeanor crimes. The prohibition covers such offenses as assault, battery and brandishing a gun.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1994 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's one of the first things they tell you when you put on a police officer's gun and badge: Responding to a domestic disturbance call is probably the most dangerous thing you'll ever do. Forget bank robberies and collaring murder suspects. More police officers are killed or seriously injured when answering a domestic call than anything else they will do in the line of duty, authorities say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
Supervisors want voters to approve a sweeping handgun ban that would prohibit almost everyone except law enforcement officers, security guards and military members from possessing such firearms in the city. The measure, which will appear on the municipal ballot next year, would bar residents from keeping handguns in their homes or businesses, said Bill Barnes, an aide to Supervisor Chris Daly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1994 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's one of the first things they tell you when you put on a police officer's gun and badge: Responding to a domestic disturbance call is probably the most dangerous thing you'll ever do. Forget bank robberies and collaring murder suspects. More police officers are killed or seriously injured when answering a domestic call than anything else they will do in the line of duty, authorities say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1993 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wider use of pepper spray on individuals who resist police officers was approved Tuesday on a 3-2 vote by the Los Angeles Police Commission, which acted over its chairman's objection that more study was needed on the spray's effects at the present level of use.
NEWS
March 20, 1993 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inglewood Police Sgt. Donald Fry was sitting in his squad car, its engine running, making a notation in his log book when a man wearing a parka and blue jeans appeared out of the darkness. "How you doing?" the man asked. He took another step toward the squad car and then suddenly whirled around, pulled a small semiautomatic pistol from his pocket and fired at Fry. The sound was deafening, echoing in the squad car like an enormous thunderclap.
NEWS
April 22, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State and local law enforcement agencies throughout California are searching employee records to determine if any of their officers are on the wrong side of a wide-ranging new gun-control law that could cost them their weapons and even their jobs. At issue is a provision of the statute that prohibits purchase or ownership of a firearm for 10 years by anyone with a history of certain misdemeanor crimes. The prohibition covers such offenses as assault, battery and brandishing a gun.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Sixteen permanent, high-intensity lights have been installed along the Tia Juana River levee to provide more protection for U.S. Border Patrol agents and illegal aliens. They also will help agents find and arrest undocumented aliens, who often are attacked in the rugged area which is a popular spot for illegal entry into the United States, officials said.
NEWS
November 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
A generation after Medgar Evers and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. were killed, the nation's first memorial to martyrs of the civil rights movement was unveiled Sunday as relatives expressed hope that young people will carry on the spirit of that turbulent era. Several people cried as they touched the cool water that flows across a circular black granite slab engraved with important events of the era, including the names of 40 people who died in the struggle for racial equality.
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Californians looking for a place to stash their assault weapons to avoid a Dec. 31 registration deadline can send them to Second Amendment Drive, out here in the Nevada desert. It's the main drag through Front Sight, a planned resort community where residents would have, not only the right, but practically a responsibility, to bear arms. This is, after all, a place where even gun novices can come out for a day of submachine-gunning.
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