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NEWS
January 1, 1994 | from Associated Press
Seventy-two police officers were killed by gunfire in 1993, more than half of all those who have died in the line of duty, the National Assn. of Chiefs of Police reported Friday. The killings, based on preliminary figures for the year, add to 2,278 shooting deaths of law enforcement officers recorded by the association since it began maintaining records on line-of-duty deaths in 1960.
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NEWS
January 1, 1994 | from Associated Press
Seventy-two police officers were killed by gunfire in 1993, more than half of all those who have died in the line of duty, the National Assn. of Chiefs of Police reported Friday. The killings, based on preliminary figures for the year, add to 2,278 shooting deaths of law enforcement officers recorded by the association since it began maintaining records on line-of-duty deaths in 1960.
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NEWS
May 2, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Committing 4,500 federal troops to immediate duty on the streets of Los Angeles, President Bush vowed Friday night to use "whatever force is necessary to restore order" if violence flares anew. The surprise action was bolstered by a separate presidential order to place nearly 6,000 National Guard forces under federal control to help restore order to the ravaged city. "What is going on in L.A. must and will stop," Bush pledged in a prime-time, nationally televised address.
NEWS
May 2, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Committing 4,500 federal troops to immediate duty on the streets of Los Angeles, President Bush vowed Friday night to use "whatever force is necessary to restore order" if violence flares anew. The surprise action was bolstered by a separate presidential order to place nearly 6,000 National Guard forces under federal control to help restore order to the ravaged city. "What is going on in L.A. must and will stop," Bush pledged in a prime-time, nationally televised address.
NEWS
September 13, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
For the first time, a federal appeals court has ruled that a U.S. government-instigated kidnapping of an individual from another country violates international human rights law and that violation can be redressed in a U.S. court. The 3-0 ruling this week by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco stems from the April 1990 abduction of Mexican physician Humberto Alvarez Machain. Alvarez had been indicted in Los Angeles three months earlier on charges that he was involved in the 1985 kidnapping and murder of U.S. DEA Agent Enrique Camarena in Guadalajara.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
For the first time, a federal appeals court has ruled that a U.S. government-instigated kidnapping of an individual from another country violates international human rights law and that violation can be redressed in a U.S. court. The 3-0 ruling this week by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco stems from the April 1990 abduction of Mexican physician Humberto Alvarez Machain.
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