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NEWS
August 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Ferenc Madl, a conservative law professor who once taught at UC Berkeley, was inaugurated as Hungary's second president since the fall of communism. Madl, elected by parliament in June, succeeded Arpad Goncz, who had served the maximum two terms in the largely ceremonial post. Madl was a power broker who helped develop the right-wing coalition that ousted a Socialist-led government in 1998. In his address, he said Hungary needed to take care of the poor and improve educational opportunity.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
In the torrent of debate flowing about Brendan Eich's resignation from Mozilla because of his support of an anti-gay rights ballot proposition (our contribution is here ), not much attention has been paid to the character of the campaign his money helped finance. It's proper to revisit that campaign, which established a new standard for odious political advertising. That's a real achievement, given the deceitful nature of most of the TV campaigns for and against California ballot propositions.  Over at Slate, Mark Joseph Stern has compiled a remembrance , with videos, of the Proposition 8 campaign to which Eich donated $1,000.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
A Chapman University law professor who died after falling from a building may have committed suicide, authorities said Monday. Orange County Supervising Deputy Coroner Daniel Aikin said preliminary findings indicated that Mary Katherine Baird Darmer, 47, took her own life Friday. But an autopsy is still pending and "our investigations are not complete yet," Aikin said. An official cause of death has not been determined, authorities said. According to details released by the coroner's office, Darmer fell from a parking garage in the 19700 block of MacArthur Boulevard in Irvine at 11:30 a.m. Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
The new documentary about Anita Hill opens with a close-up of a telephone and a bizarre voice mail message: "Good morning, Anita Hill. It's Ginni Thomas, and I just wanted to reach across the air waves, and the years and ask you to consider something. I would love you to consider an apology sometime, and some full explanation of why you did what you did with my husband. So give it some thought, I certainly pray about this and hope one day you will help us understand why you did what you did. OK!
NEWS
June 11, 1992
Jon H. Sylvester of Los Feliz, a professor at Loyola Law School of Loyola Marymount University, was recently awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to teach at the University of Nairobi during the 1992-93 academic year. Sylvester, who teaches contracts and international business transactions, will teach similar courses, lecture on the Third World debt crisis, and do research on commercial and trade law in East Africa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
In 1970, Joseph Sax wrote a law review article that laid the foundation for a court case that would become famous in the annals of California water. More than a decade after publication of Sax's seminal essay on the public trust doctrine, the California Supreme Court ruled that the state had a duty to take into account the public trust in allocating water resources - an opinion that ultimately forced Los Angeles to reduce diversions from the Mono Lake basin in the Eastern Sierra.
NEWS
January 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Maurice Jerry Sychuk, 47, a University of Alberta law professor, was charged Saturday with the murder of his wife, Claudia Sychuk, 44. The couple's son, Greg, 17, said he found his mother's body in their Edmonton home early Friday when he returned from a New Year's Eve party. She had been stabbed to death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
Georgetown University law professor Martin D. Ginsburg, the husband of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, died Sunday of cancer, the Supreme Court announced. He was 78. Though he was among the nation's foremost experts on tax law, Ginsburg relished his role as the outgoing half of one of Washington's prominent couples. Marty and Ruth Ginsburg were married for 56 years, and friends often described theirs as a successful marriage of two seemingly quite different individuals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UCLA law professor Daniel Jay Bussel was convicted of vehicular manslaughter Friday, nearly a year after he struck two pedestrians in a Van Nuys crosswalk, killing one. Bussel, 40, the husband of Los Angeles Police Commissioner Raquelle de la Rocha, faces a maximum sentence of one year in County Jail, a one-year revocation of his driver's license and a $1,000 fine. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Elizabeth A. Lippitt in Van Nuys scheduled sentencing for Monday.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | Associated Press
President Reagan today chose David S. Ruder, a Northwestern University law professor with no prior government experience, to become chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission. In a statement announcing the nomination, Reagan cited Ruder's "expertise in the areas of securities anti-fraud provisions, insider trading, tender-offer regulation and SEC enforcement" in assuming the chairman's post.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
In 1970, Joseph Sax wrote a law review article that laid the foundation for a court case that would become famous in the annals of California water. More than a decade after publication of Sax's seminal essay on the public trust doctrine, the California Supreme Court ruled that the state had a duty to take into account the public trust in allocating water resources - an opinion that ultimately forced Los Angeles to reduce diversions from the Mono Lake basin in the Eastern Sierra.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By August Brown
Back in 2010, Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig gave a lecture on copyright law. Speaking at a conference for the organization Creative Commons, he used YouTube clips of fans dancing to Phoenix's song " Lisztomania" as an example of proper "fair use" principles. He later uploaded the full lecture, which included the clips, to YouTube.   Liberation Music, the firm that licenses the Phoenix song in Australia and New Zealand, disagreed with Lessig's take. The firm issued a YouTube takedown order , asking that the lecture video be removed, and later threatened their own lawsuit against Lessig.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
It's either a small fix to protect the free exercise of religion or a "no cake for gays" bill that would invite businesses to discriminate, depending on whom you talk to. The legislation,  SB 1062, would bolster a business owner's right to defend refusing service to someone when the owner believes doing so would violate their the practice and observance of religion. Supporters call it a "religious freedom" bill. As Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer weighs whether to sign the measure into law, here's a look at what the proposal is all about.  Why was SB 1062 proposed?
NATIONAL
February 3, 2014 | By David Zucchino
TAMPA, Fla. - As an Army sniper in Iraq and Afghanistan, Gabriel Brown craved danger. Combat satisfied what he called his "adrenaline addiction. " When he returned home to Florida, nothing in civilian life provided the sense of invincibility that made combat so alluring and vital. The sniper was now a nursing student. There was a hole in his life, but he found a way to fill it: robbing banks. He robbed with a military flair. On Feb. 5, 2013, Brown whipped out a gun and tossed an M83 military smoke grenade during a robbery of a TD Bank branch in Auburndale, Fla., that netted $19,000.
OPINION
January 19, 2014 | By Eric J. Segall
Rarely in American history has the Supreme Court been called on to decide so many important social, legal and political issues in such a relatively brief period of time. This term, the court will hand down decisions on affirmative action, campaign finance reform, free speech and the separation of church and state. At the same time, the lower courts are struggling with new and aggressive abortion laws, same-sex marriage restrictions at the state level and yet more church/state issues that could have important consequences for President Obama's Affordable Care Act, even as more constitutional challenges to that legislation are headed toward the high court.
WORLD
December 20, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The Supreme Court of Canada unanimously struck down three laws against prostitution in a landmark ruling Friday, deeming the bans on visiting brothels, living off a prostitute's proceeds and public solicitation "overly broad" and potentially dangerous for sex workers. While prostitution is legal in Canada, the laws aimed at preventing its practice went far beyond protecting communities from public nuisances associated with the sex trade, the nine justices decided. "Parliament has the power to regulate against nuisances, but not at the cost of the health, safety and lives of prostitutes," wrote Chief Justice Beverley McLaughlin.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lone law professor roiled the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday by suggesting a novel way for President Clinton and his supporters to forestall impeachment. Bruce Ackerman of Yale University, testifying on Clinton's behalf, argued that any articles of impeachment approved by the House in this post-election, lame-duck session might not be legally valid in the Senate when the new Congress convenes in January.
NEWS
September 11, 1986 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
A group of more than 100 law professors Wednesday sharply questioned Chief Justice-designate William H. Rehnquist's integrity and ethical standards, urging senators to resist politics and decide whether to confirm him as a matter of individual conscience. In a letter to the Senate, distributed by Sen. Howard H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2013 | By David Zahniser
The committee charged with investigating discrimination complaints against elected officials at Los Angeles City Hall met Friday to begin its review of sexual harassment allegations filed against City Councilman Jose Huizar. The Special Committee on Investigative Oversight gathered behind closed doors to deal with the complaint lodged three months ago by Francine Godoy, 34, a former deputy chief of staff to Huizar. Godoy worked until April for Huizar, who represents El Sereno, Boyle Heights, Eagle Rock and downtown.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By Erin Aubry Kaplan
Why is America so intent on killing affirmative action? Randall Kennedy's clear-eyed new book, "For Discrimination," offers many reasons, among them: As a remedy for racial injustice, albeit a modest one, affirmative action invokes slavery and, therefore, rattles the philosophical foundation of democracy and fairness upon which much of America believes the country was built. Another reason is that affirmative action is seen as increasingly incompatible with the aims of the so-called post-racial age in which a first black president would seem to argue against any more need for racial redress.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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