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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2013 | By Jason Song
Loyola Law School administrators once justified accepting extra students or raising tuition because the market virtually guaranteed prospective attorneys a high-paying job after graduation. But faced with growing alumni complaints that they can't find employment, Dean Victor Gold and other administrators decided this year to do something they had never done before: They accepted fewer students. Loyola, southwest of downtown Los Angeles, enrolled 20 fewer applicants than last year, about an 5% drop - and a loss of about $1 million.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
TUNICA, Miss. - Marie Barnard was delighted when, after decades of silence on the topic, Mississippi passed a law requiring school districts to teach sex education. But the lesson involving the Peppermint Pattie wasn't what she had in mind for her sons. The curricula adopted by the school district in Oxford called on students to unwrap a piece of chocolate, pass it around class and observe how dirty it became. "They're using the Peppermint Pattie to show that a girl is no longer clean or valuable after she's had sex - that she's been used," said Barnard, who works in public health.
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NEWS
September 5, 1985
Southwestern University School of Law's Friends of the Library will honor restaurateur Lud Renick Sunday at a 5:30 to 8 p.m. "Wine Affair" at Descanso Gardens. Renick will receive the "Achievement in Wine" award at the fourth annual event. He is proprietor of La Couronne and the Chronicle restaurants in Pasadena and Santa Monica. Southwestern's Friends of the Library is a support group for one of the fastest-growing libraries among the nation's accredited law schools.
OPINION
December 27, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Whatever you think of affirmative action programs at universities and graduate schools, it's important to know whether they're working - that is, whether they are preparing their beneficiaries for professional success. But for several years now, the California bar has resisted attempts by a critic of racial preferences to obtain information about the test scores and grades of graduates who take the state bar examination. Last week, the California Supreme Court wisely rejected the state bar's argument and ruled it must turn over the information to Richard Sander, a law professor at UCLA, and other researchers - provided that a way is found to protect the identities of individual test-takers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western State University College of Law is making plans to open a satellite campus here in hopes of becoming the first established law school in the burgeoning South County area, its president said Thursday. Western State, already the largest law school in California, hopes to have as many as 200 students in Irvine by the 1990 fall semester, with the possibility of expanding to 1,000 students within four or five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1997 | DEBRA CANO
Chapman University officials have announced the start of construction on an $18-million law school in a historic building across from its campus. The move to build the 130,000-square-foot law school is an attempt to garner national accreditation. Nearly 60 law school students recently accepted tuition refunds due to the lack of national accreditation. Some students sued over the accreditation status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Pacific West College of Law has until Oct. 22 to correct problems with construction on its building that was performed without city building permits, officials said. Chuck Daleo, a Fullerton building official, said doors and walls were installed without a permit. College officials said they are working to correct the problems and expect to pass inspection. The 4-year-old law school, which was in Orange but moved to Fullerton last year, has 40 students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2001 | DENNIS McLELLAN and H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The dean of a small Christian law school in Santa Ana has been suspended with pay for several weeks while authorities look into allegations that he lifted text from the Encyclopaedia Britannica for an article in the school's law journal. The allegations concern an article that Trinity Law School Dean Winston L. Frost wrote on the history of human rights for the Trinity Law Review last year. Frost, 43, also works as a part-time judge for the Orange County Superior Court.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | Associated Press
The estate of the first woman to win a case before the North Carolina Supreme Court nearly 80 years ago has pledged $14 million to two North Carolina law schools. Kathrine R. Everett, one of Chapel Hill's first female law graduates, made state legal history in 1920 by becoming the first woman to win a case before its highest court, said Judith Wegner, dean of UNC's law school. Everett died in 1992 at 98 after a legal career spanning seven decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2004 | Mike Anton, Times Staff Writer
Western State University College of Law in Fullerton has sued the American Bar Assn., alleging that the organization is unfairly seeking to strip the school of its national accreditation because it has a "historic hostility" toward for-profit law schools. The lawsuit, filed Friday in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
It was billed as a bold attempt to give parents the power to transform their failing schools. But more than two years after California legislators passed the parent-trigger law, it has sparked so much controversy that even the measure's author supports revisions. Los Angeles Unified last week launched the first effort in the state to ease confusion and conflict over the 2010 law, which allows parents to oust staff, change curriculum, close a campus or convert the school to an independent public charter.
OPINION
September 6, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Sergio C. Garcia was brought to the United States illegally by his parents when he was a minor. Since then, he has earned a college degree and worked his way through law school. He's met all the requirements necessary to become a lawyer, passing the bar exam and receiving a positive moral character determination from the Committee of Bar Examiners. The only thing Garcia lacks is a law license. The State Bar of California, which normally determines who should receive a law license, has recommended he be given one, and Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2013 | By Jason Song
Loyola Law School administrators once justified accepting extra students or raising tuition because the market virtually guaranteed prospective attorneys a high-paying job after graduation. But faced with growing alumni complaints that they can't find employment, Dean Victor Gold and other administrators decided this year to do something they had never done before: They accepted fewer students. Loyola, southwest of downtown Los Angeles, enrolled 20 fewer applicants than last year, about an 5% drop - and a loss of about $1 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Chapman University's law school has received a $55-million gift from real estate developer Dale E. Fowler and his wife, Sarah Ann.  The gift is believed to be one of the largest ever pledged to an American law school. As a result of the donation, the 560-student law school in Orange County will be named the Dale E. Fowler School of Law. A ceremony marking that change is scheduled for Sept. 10, with former U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz as keynote speaker. Fowler, who invested in industrial property development, is an alumnus of Chapman University, as are two of his children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2013 | By Jason Song
Two Los Angeles law schools are launching programs designed to give their students real-world legal experience by writing briefs on behalf of nonprofit groups or other causes that professors deem worthy. Unlike better-known programs in which law students take on longer-term pro bono work that focuses on single cases, students at UCLA and Southwestern law schools will write amicus briefs, often known as "friend of the court" documents. "I have not heard of law schools doing anything quite like this," said Eugene Volokh, a UCLA law professor who will head the university's First Amendment Amicus Brief Clinic this fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
Two UC Berkeley law school graduates accused of beheading a large exotic bird in Las Vegas entered their pleas in court this week. Three men -- the two graduates and a third-year law student -- were accused of chasing a 14-year-old helmeted guinea fowl around the Flamingo Hotel's Wildlife Habitat on Oct. 12, cornering the bird and severing its head.  When officers arrived, witnesses told them they saw the men “throwing the dead bird, discussing...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
The San Fernando Valley College of Law will celebrate a return to the use of its original name at a ribbon-cutting ceremony tonight. The Valley's only law school, founded in 1962, merged with the University of La Verne in 1985, making it the University of La Verne, San Fernando Valley College of Law campus. The university also runs a law school in Ontario that next month will apply for American Bar Assn. approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1998 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Legal issues of race in Orange County will be discussed today in a forum at Western State University College of Law. The free forum, titled "The Orange Curtain? Perspectives on Race and the Law," will run from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Panelists include Neil Gotanda, recently named Outstanding Minority Professor of the Year by the American Assn. of Law Schools, and other Western State professors. The campus address is 1111 N. State College Blvd., Fullerton. Information: (714) 738-1000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2013 | By Jeremiah Dobruck
An Orange County law school hopes to ease the stress on the financially burdened California court system by offering its newly christened practice courtroom on campus as a venue for official legal proceedings. Whittier Law School in Costa Mesa will offer to host public court proceedings, including trials and arbitration hearing. Such an arrangement would benefit students, allowing them to observe the proceedings in the school's fully functioning 4,400-square-foot courtroom, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
California needs to strengthen regulation of hydraulic fracturing, according to a UC Berkeley Law School report that identified a number of shortcomings in state oversight of the controversial practice. Although not new to California, fracking has come under increasing scrutiny recently as states such as Pennsylvania and New York experience a boom in the technique, which involves the high-pressure injection of chemical-laced fluids into the ground to crack rock formations and extract oil and gas. Environmental concerns center on potential groundwater contamination from fracking fluids and disposal of saline wastewater.
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