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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
A law professor at New York University has been tentatively named dean of UCLA's School of Law, Chancellor Albert Carnesale announced Monday. The appointment of Michael H. Schill, 45, is subject to approval by the Board of Regents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | Associated Press
Courses have begun for 120 students at the new law school at the University of St. Thomas, a Roman Catholic institution that plans to take a faith-based approach to learning the legal system. "While most places study the law based on reasoning, faith-based schools integrate a belief system with reasoning," said the dean, David Link, formerly dean of the University of Notre Dame law school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2007 | Garrett Therolf, Times Staff Writer
Irvine Co. Chairman Donald Bren will donate $20 million to get UC Irvine's fledgling law school off the ground and have it named in his honor. The donation, announced Monday, will ensure that the Donald Bren School of Law will greet an expected first class of 67 students on schedule in fall 2009, said UCI Chancellor Michael V. Drake. "Mr Bren is an astute investor and . . . wants this law school to be the very best that it can be," Drake said.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
The USC Law School has become the first of its kind in the country to appoint a chief information officer. The new post highlights the growing importance of information technology in the legal profession, said USC Law School Dean Scott Bice. "The past decade has seen a revolution in the way legal information is gathered, stored and disseminated," Bice said. "Today's legal information has become a major mix of multimedia, in addition to the traditional books and periodicals."
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | Reuters
The New England Law School on Wednesday offered a $25,000 reward to help find the killer of a faculty member who was stabbed to death in her Cambridge, Mass., neighborhood. Mary Joe Frug was attacked April 4, 1991, as she walked to a grocery store. Authorities said they have interviewed more than 200 people during the investigation.
NEWS
September 10, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
Republican vice presidential candidate Dan Quayle was admitted to law school in 1970 through a special "equal opportunity" program designed to "reach out" to the poor, racial minorities and other students who might not be admitted through regular procedures, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reported Friday. A Quayle spokesman confirmed that the program was Quayle's route into law school, but defended its use.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1999 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, legal business reporter
The booming economy is resulting in a windfall for top-notch law school graduates. For the first time, law firms operating in California are offering six-figure salaries to their first-year associates. Robert Major, a partner in Major, Hagen & Africa, a legal recruiting firm in San Francisco, said stiff competition for young lawyers is driving up first-year pay. Keker & Van Nest, a San Francisco law firm headed by former Iran-Contra prosecutor John W.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a serene campus at the edge of this city's botanical garden, 100 students and a handful of professors are breaking every rule in this nation's higher-education handbook. The Bucerius Law School, which opened to the first freshman class this fall, has halved the student-teacher ratio prevailing at Germany's overcrowded and underfunded state universities and toppled the ivy-covered walls that isolate professors from pupils.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1999 | STEPHEN GREGORY
In a nod to the growing importance of small business to the California economy, Western State University College of Law in Fullerton plans to launch a new program teaching students to think more like entrepreneurs so they can assist business owners more effectively.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A federal judge on Tuesday ordered the University of Michigan's law school to quit using race as a factor in admissions, ruling that its affirmative action policies violate the U.S. Constitution and are not in the state's interest. U.S. District Judge Bernard Friedman dismissed the school's arguments that affirmative action is needed to "level the playing field" so minorities can compete in a society filled with either past or present discrimination.
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