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BUSINESS
June 12, 2012 | By E. Scott Reckard
UC Irvine law students will travel California this summer to help determine if five giant banks are fulfilling the pledges they made in a $25-billion settlement of foreclosure-abuse investigations. The students -- three this summer, and later expanding to eight or nine -- will meet with housing counselors, legal-aid groups and homeowners. They will work for a consumer-protection clinic set up by  Katherine Porter , the UC Irvine law professor tapped by California Atty.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
A UC Berkeley law school graduate student was sentenced to six months at a prison boot camp Wednesday for beheading an exotic bird during a drunken chase at a Las Vegas Strip resort. Justin Alexander Teixeira, 25, will serve his sentence at a prison boot camp at High Desert State Prison in Indian Springs outside Las Vegas. Upon successful completion of the program and three to five years of probation, his felony charge could be reduced to a misdemeanor, the Associated Press reported.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1997
Dana Parsons' Feb. 5 column gave appropriate credit to the students who took a great risk in being the first to attend Chapman University School of Law, but it was unduly harsh in its criticism of Dean Jeremy Miller. Rather than reflecting a cavalier attitude, as Parsons implies, Dean Miller's positive outlook is just what is needed in the face of the American Bar Assn. withholding accreditation at this point. I have a keen appreciation for the importance of ABA approval, as I received my law degree from an ABA-approved law school in Los Angeles and then taught at one, in San Diego.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2013 | By Jason Song
Two Los Angeles law schools are launching programs designed to give their students real-world legal experience by writing briefs on behalf of nonprofit groups or other causes that professors deem worthy. Unlike better-known programs in which law students take on longer-term pro bono work that focuses on single cases, students at UCLA and Southwestern law schools will write amicus briefs, often known as "friend of the court" documents. "I have not heard of law schools doing anything quite like this," said Eugene Volokh, a UCLA law professor who will head the university's First Amendment Amicus Brief Clinic this fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2013 | By Jason Song
Two Los Angeles law schools are launching programs designed to give their students real-world legal experience by writing briefs on behalf of nonprofit groups or other causes that professors deem worthy. Unlike better-known programs in which law students take on longer-term pro bono work that focuses on single cases, students at UCLA and Southwestern law schools will write amicus briefs, often known as "friend of the court" documents. "I have not heard of law schools doing anything quite like this," said Eugene Volokh, a UCLA law professor who will head the university's First Amendment Amicus Brief Clinic this fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2006
Nov. 24, 1914: Twenty-one people -- 19 USC law students, a faculty member and a stenographer -- had "squeezed into an elevator" in the Tajo Building at 1st Street and Broadway when the cage "dropped five stories to the pit, 65 feet below," The Times reported. The accident occurred as students were "scrambling from a class in torts" and the elevator was "loaded far beyond its safety limit," the newspaper said. No one escaped injury, but none was killed.
NEWS
April 19, 1990
Law students at UCLA and 13 other schools nationwide raised $50,000 for the homeless by choosing cheaper meals and hotels during law firm interview trips. About 35 Los Angeles-area law firms and about one-third of the 1,000 students at UCLA Law School participated in the "Firm Commitment" program, said Harriet Pearson, a third-year UCLA law student.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1985
A five-student team from Southwestern University School of Law in Los Angeles will face a team from the National University of Singapore in the finals of the annual Philip E. Jessup Law Moot Court competition in New York on Saturday.
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | From Associated Press
University of California law students on Thursday fired back at reports that their school's admissions policies violate civil rights laws, in particular taking issue with characterizations of the procedures as a quota system. "Race has never been and never will be the sole or controlling factor in the admissions policy of Boalt (Berkeley's School of Law)," said George Washington, president of the Boalt Hall Students Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1992 | JOHN BATTELLE
Final results from the State Bar examination brought welcome news to the Ventura College of Law this week. Of those students taking the test for the first time, more than 76% passed, compared with a statewide average of 51%. "It's nice to have such good news," said William Fischbach, dean of the Ventura and Santa Barbara colleges of law. "This was a very good year." The Ventura College of Law offers its courses at night, Fischbach said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
Two UC Berkeley law school graduates accused of beheading a large exotic bird in Las Vegas entered their pleas in court this week. Three men -- the two graduates and a third-year law student -- were accused of chasing a 14-year-old helmeted guinea fowl around the Flamingo Hotel's Wildlife Habitat on Oct. 12, cornering the bird and severing its head.  When officers arrived, witnesses told them they saw the men “throwing the dead bird, discussing...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dozens of law graduates across the nation have joined class-action lawsuits alleging that law schools lured them in with misleading reports of their graduates' success. Instead of working in the law, some of the graduates were toiling at hourly jobs in department stores and restaurants and struggling to pay back more than $100,000 in loans used to finance their education. Others were in temporary or part-time legal positions. Michael D. Lieberman decided to enroll at Southwestern Law School after reading that 97% of its graduates were employed within nine months.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2012 | By E. Scott Reckard
UC Irvine law students will travel California this summer to help determine if five giant banks are fulfilling the pledges they made in a $25-billion settlement of foreclosure-abuse investigations. The students -- three this summer, and later expanding to eight or nine -- will meet with housing counselors, legal-aid groups and homeowners. They will work for a consumer-protection clinic set up by  Katherine Porter , the UC Irvine law professor tapped by California Atty.
WORLD
June 14, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Beneath a crown of black curls, Benjamin Salinas offers his clients encouraging words about past courtroom victories and the chance to make history. Salinas, 21, and six equally earnest colleagues seated with him in a sterile conference room have yet to graduate from law school. But their clients, half a dozen homemakers and retirees with hearing aids and support hose, seem unbothered. They are desperate to recover their life savings, lost in an alleged investment scam, and this may be their best chance of getting justice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2010 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Upon embracing her son for the first time in 13 years, Lois Taylor fingered the gray strands in his unkempt beard, tears welling up in the corners of her eyes. "Stop crying, Mom," her son, Gregory, whispered into her ear. "It's over. I'm out. " Gregory Taylor, who was serving a 25-years-to-life prison sentence for a three-strikes offense, walked out of a downtown Los Angeles jail Thursday a free man. Once outside, Taylor, now 48, looked up at the cloudless blue sky and took a couple of deep breaths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2010 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Gregory Taylor's case was so egregious that an appellate justice likened him to Jean Valjean of Victor Hugo's "Les Miserables," so disconcerting that he became the centerpiece of debate in a district attorney's race, so bewildering that a chapter was devoted to his story in a 2005 book about California's three-strikes law. Taylor was a 35-year-old homeless man when he was arrested in 1997 for attempting to break into the kitchen of a Catholic church...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
About 90 Los Angeles law students have joined a nationwide group of aspiring lawyers who have volunteered to counsel the Cuban detainees who rioted at two federal prisons late last year and are now facing deportation hearings. So far, more than 300 students at six law schools across the country--including about 40 each from USC and UCLA, with a few from other area law schools--have answered an appeal from an Atlanta civil liberties group that is organizing the project.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Legal Affairs Writer
More than 20 major California law firms, along with 90 others throughout the country, are cautiously participating in a pilot program by Harvard University law students to divert extravagant "perks" to the homeless. Conceived by a student group called "Code Critical," the ambitious program could raise $50,000 in 1989, its experimental start-up year, and more than $200,000 annually when additional law schools and law firms are enlisted for 1990.
OPINION
May 12, 2010 | Jonathan Turley
If confirmed as a Supreme Court justice, Elena Kagan will bring greater diversity to the court by adding a third woman. What she will not bring is educational diversity. Her confirmation will leave the court entirely composed of former law students at either Harvard or Yale. The decision of President Obama to select a nominee from one of these two schools is particularly disappointing as a replacement for Justice John Paul Stevens — an iconic figure on the court who was also its only graduate from an alternative institution (Northwestern)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2010 | By Larry Gordon
Students at Loyola Law School in downtown Los Angeles have managed to boost their grade-point averages slightly -- and they didn't even have to study any harder. The 1,300-student school has adjusted its grading formula for current students and recent graduates to match the scales of other California schools, officials said Friday. But the move, which raised the average mark by a third of a grade, also prompted allegations of grade inflation. The change was intended to ensure that graduates compete for jobs on an equal footing with other law schools' graduates and are not hurt by what had been a slightly tougher grading system, said Loyola Law School Dean Victor J. Gold.
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