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WORLD
September 12, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Viyah Lee sports her five tattoos like hidden badges of rebellion: a small treble clef in her ear, her name fashioned in leopard spots on her left hip, discreet images on her wrist and ankles. Now the 26-year-old former model is ready to emerge from the body art closet. Defying long-held prejudices and an edict decreeing that only physicians can tattoo, she's crafting her own skin design, which she plans to have etched on a prominent spot on her neck or shoulders. "These images are an art form, not a medical procedure," she says.
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WORLD
August 25, 2012 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
PARIS - Mention the name Daniel Orgeval in France these days, and an unpopular little device inevitably comes up: the breathalyzer. But lately Orgeval has been thinking about another "gadget" that was once a staple in the country's system of law and order: the guillotine. "If they were still around today," he says, hesitates, looks straight ahead and raises thin, graying eyebrows, "I start to wonder. About mob lynching. Things like that. " Orgeval, 65, has rings around his eyes, and his face gets a clammy sheen when he mentions the threats people have made against him for his support of the alcohol test.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
AVELLA, Pa. - About two years ago, Dr. Amy Pare began treating members of the Moten family and their neighbors from a working-class neighborhood less than half a mile from a natural gas well here. A plastic surgeon whose specialty includes skin cancer, Pare removed and biopsied quarter-size skin lesions from Jeannie Moten, 53, and her niece, only to find that the sores recurred. "The good news is that it wasn't cancer, and the bad news is that we have no idea what it is," Pare said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2011 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- The display of graphic photos of aborted fetuses outside a Rancho Palos Verdes middle school in 2003 resulted in outrage, a years-long court battle and now a new state law. Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday signed the legislation that makes it a misdemeanor to create a disturbance on or next to an elementary or middle school campus where the action threatens the physical safety of students. Violators of the law, which takes effect Jan. 1, face up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $500.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Responding to complaints from businesses, Gov. Jerry Brown is proposing an overhaul of California's 26-year-old landmark clean water and anti-toxins law that he said is being misused by "unscrupulous lawyers" filing lawsuits. At issue is the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act, or Proposition 65, approved by voters in 1986. It requires product manufacturers, retailers and property owners to post signs warning the public if goods or premises contain chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer or birth defects.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Attorneys on Thursday filed the first lawsuits challenging the constitutionality of a new Arizona law that makes it a state crime to lack proper immigration papers and requires local police to determine whether people are in the country legally. The National Coalition of Latino Clergy and Christian Leaders sued in U.S. District Court, arguing that the law is an unconstitutional intrusion into the federal government's ability to regulate immigration and that it would lead to racial profiling.
OPINION
March 4, 2010
In three cases argued this year, members of the Supreme Court have expressed qualms about a law used to convict politicians and corporate executives of fraud. The law, which makes it a crime to "deprive another of the intangible right of honest services," is so vague and open-ended that the court should strike it down. As is often the case with challenges to over-broad statutes, the attacks on the "honest services fraud" law come from unsympathetic defendants. This week, the law was challenged by Jeffrey K. Skilling, the former Enron chief executive who was convicted not just of insider trading and securities fraud but of a conspiracy count that included honest services fraud.
WORLD
March 19, 2012 | By Simon Roughneen and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
  A century-old law allowing up to 15-year prison sentences for those offending Thailand'sKing Bhumibol Adulyadej has sparked controversy and calls for change as its use has increased. Many who support the lese-majeste statute say it is necessary to uphold the dignity of a king they portray as enlightened and selfless, transcending raucous, corruption-prone Thai politics. Others say the 1908 law meaning "injured majesty," with ancient roots that made it a crime to offend a reigning monarch, undercuts free expression and has no place in modern times.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A conservative Missouri lawmaker has proposed a bill that would send his fellow lawmakers to prison if they propose more gun-control legislation. H.B. 633 , proposed by Mike Leara, a St. Louis County Republican, would make it a felony punishable with up to four years in prison for anyone who "proposes a piece of legislation that further restricts the right of an individual to bear arms, as set forth under the second amendment of the Constitution of the United States. " The Missouri representative's bill follows other proposed cantankerous legislation coming out of that state, where the state's House of Representatives passed a bill that could imprison government officials for up to a year if they enforced President Obama's Affordable Care Act. Another recent bill would have essentially severed Missouri from the federal government.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
The Supreme Court debated sex, violence and free speech Tuesday, as several justices strongly argued for breaking new ground and upholding a California law that would forbid the sale of violent video games to those under age 18. "Why isn't it common sense," said Justice Stephen G. Breyer, that if the law can forbid selling pictures of a "naked woman" to a young teen, it can also forbid the sale of scenes "of gratuitous torture of children" in...
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