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NATIONAL
May 3, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
Amy Meyer was standing outside a slaughterhouse in Draper City, Utah, in February and said she saw what she had suspected: wounded animals being dragged to their deaths. Then she did what she had come for in this YouTube age and took out her cellphone to record it. Meyer was charged with a misdemeanor in connection with the incident, accused of violating a controversial new law in the Beehive State that forbids the recording of unauthorized photos or videos of agricultural operations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
Almost as soon as Matthew Hoff turned 18 and aged out of the mental health programs he'd been enrolled in since childhood, he was out on the streets and in and out of jail. His parents tried to get him back into treatment for bipolar and other brain disorders he suffers, but the young man wasn't cooperative and he wasn't considered dangerous or gravely disabled. So they stood by helplessly as their son faded from their reach. Less than a year later, Hoff walked into a Buena Park bank with a robbery note and left with a handful of cash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1998
Michael Kelly ("The Corruption of Democracy," Commentary, Feb. 11) informs us that we are required to obey every law, no matter how onerous or odious. Really? Consider the following moral thought experiment. In some states certain sexual acts are legally proscribed, even if the participants are a married couple in their own bedroom with the shades drawn. What if a friend, living in such a state, were to tell you that she and her husband thoroughly enjoy these acts but never engage in them, because, she says, if we can pick and choose which laws to obey we're on a slippery slope to anarchy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown indicated that he would support protecting public access to government records in a constitutional amendment to be voted on next fall, but still supports temporarily weakening the law that ensures public access to official documents. Brown's comments, which came in a statement released Wednesday evening, capped a wild day at the state Capitol, which had lawmakers scrambling to cope with the fallout of last week's vote to water down the law.  At Brown's urging, both houses approved a measure making local compliance with part of the state's public records laws optional.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Trayvon Martin's parents appeared before a task force in Florida on Tuesday to denounce the way the state's controversial "stand your ground" law can be used to protect aggressors. Tracy Martin and Sybrina Fulton believe that's what happened in the case of their son, who was unarmed when he was shot and killed in February by a neighborhood watch volunteer. "They need to amend these laws," Fulton said, according to the Orlando Sentinel, which was covering the task force hearing.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Planned Parenthood and others opponents of new Texas abortion restrictions have appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court to reinstate an injunction blocking portions of the law concerning doctors' admitting privileges. The appeal was filed with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, who gave state officials until next Tuesday to file a response before he rules. Scalia could rule on the injunction himself or refer the issue to the full court. Opponents said Monday that because of the new restrictions, a third of the state's licensed health centers have had to stop providing abortion services, including at least 14 providers, which will restrict abortion access to about 20,000 women annually.
OPINION
July 6, 2013 | By Rick Settersten
Our family exists at the crossroads of two of the most controversial aspects of American society - sexuality and race. We're two gay white men raising two black children - a girl, 13, and a boy, 10. Both children were adopted out of the foster care system as toddlers, and they both landed in that system because their birth mothers could not care for them. Each day we struggle with the legacies of their troubled beginnings, which gives us all the more joy as we see them thrive. Dan and I are a long-lived couple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2011 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- The display of graphic photos of aborted fetuses outside a Rancho Palos Verdes middle school in 2003 resulted in outrage, a years-long court battle and now a new state law. Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday signed the legislation that makes it a misdemeanor to create a disturbance on or next to an elementary or middle school campus where the action threatens the physical safety of students. Violators of the law, which takes effect Jan. 1, face up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $500.
NATIONAL
April 19, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Daniel Swalm was researching his family when he came across a disturbing episode in immigration history. That discovery would lead to a move in the U.S. Senate to apologize for action the nation took more than a century ago. Swalm discovered that under an obscure 1907 law, his grandmother Elsie, born and raised in Minnesota, was stripped of her U.S. citizenship after marrying an immigrant from Sweden. Swalm had never heard of the Expatriation Act that required a U.S.-born woman who married a foreigner to "take the nationality of her husband.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Responding to complaints from businesses, Gov. Jerry Brown is proposing an overhaul of California's 26-year-old landmark clean water and anti-toxins law that he said is being misused by "unscrupulous lawyers" filing lawsuits. At issue is the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act, or Proposition 65, approved by voters in 1986. It requires product manufacturers, retailers and property owners to post signs warning the public if goods or premises contain chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer or birth defects.
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