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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1998
Michael Kelly ("The Corruption of Democracy," Commentary, Feb. 11) informs us that we are required to obey every law, no matter how onerous or odious. Really? Consider the following moral thought experiment. In some states certain sexual acts are legally proscribed, even if the participants are a married couple in their own bedroom with the shades drawn. What if a friend, living in such a state, were to tell you that she and her husband thoroughly enjoy these acts but never engage in them, because, she says, if we can pick and choose which laws to obey we're on a slippery slope to anarchy.
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NATIONAL
November 4, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Planned Parenthood and others opponents of new Texas abortion restrictions have appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court to reinstate an injunction blocking portions of the law concerning doctors' admitting privileges. The appeal was filed with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, who gave state officials until next Tuesday to file a response before he rules. Scalia could rule on the injunction himself or refer the issue to the full court. Opponents said Monday that because of the new restrictions, a third of the state's licensed health centers have had to stop providing abortion services, including at least 14 providers, which will restrict abortion access to about 20,000 women annually.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
Amy Meyer was standing outside a slaughterhouse in Draper City, Utah, in February and said she saw what she had suspected: wounded animals being dragged to their deaths. Then she did what she had come for in this YouTube age and took out her cellphone to record it. Meyer was charged with a misdemeanor in connection with the incident, accused of violating a controversial new law in the Beehive State that forbids the recording of unauthorized photos or videos of agricultural operations.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Responding to complaints from businesses, Gov. Jerry Brown is proposing an overhaul of California's 26-year-old landmark clean water and anti-toxins law that he said is being misused by "unscrupulous lawyers" filing lawsuits. At issue is the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act, or Proposition 65, approved by voters in 1986. It requires product manufacturers, retailers and property owners to post signs warning the public if goods or premises contain chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer or birth defects.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2012 | By Tina Susman and Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
It has been called "obscene," "stupid" and the "right-to-commit-murder law. " It has also been credited with protecting people like Sarah McKinley, a young widow who killed a knife-wielding man after he broke into her Oklahoma home. Opinions about so-called "stand your ground" legislation - at the center of the Trayvon Martin killing in Sanford, Fla. - are as vastly different as the cases in which it has been invoked since Florida in 2005 became the first state to adopt such a statute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2011 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- The display of graphic photos of aborted fetuses outside a Rancho Palos Verdes middle school in 2003 resulted in outrage, a years-long court battle and now a new state law. Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday signed the legislation that makes it a misdemeanor to create a disturbance on or next to an elementary or middle school campus where the action threatens the physical safety of students. Violators of the law, which takes effect Jan. 1, face up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $500.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
Almost as soon as Matthew Hoff turned 18 and aged out of the mental health programs he'd been enrolled in since childhood, he was out on the streets and in and out of jail. His parents tried to get him back into treatment for bipolar and other brain disorders he suffers, but the young man wasn't cooperative and he wasn't considered dangerous or gravely disabled. So they stood by helplessly as their son faded from their reach. Less than a year later, Hoff walked into a Buena Park bank with a robbery note and left with a handful of cash.
OPINION
March 4, 2010
In three cases argued this year, members of the Supreme Court have expressed qualms about a law used to convict politicians and corporate executives of fraud. The law, which makes it a crime to "deprive another of the intangible right of honest services," is so vague and open-ended that the court should strike it down. As is often the case with challenges to over-broad statutes, the attacks on the "honest services fraud" law come from unsympathetic defendants. This week, the law was challenged by Jeffrey K. Skilling, the former Enron chief executive who was convicted not just of insider trading and securities fraud but of a conspiracy count that included honest services fraud.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
The Supreme Court debated sex, violence and free speech Tuesday, as several justices strongly argued for breaking new ground and upholding a California law that would forbid the sale of violent video games to those under age 18. "Why isn't it common sense," said Justice Stephen G. Breyer, that if the law can forbid selling pictures of a "naked woman" to a young teen, it can also forbid the sale of scenes "of gratuitous torture of children" in...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Law in These Parts" sounds like the title of a routine western, maybe something starring Tom Mix or Johnny Mack Brown, but it turns out to be considerably more compelling and provocative. Directed by Ra'anan Alexandrowicz and winner of the World Cinema Grand Jury Prize at Sundance, this is the second superb Israeli documentary (after "The Gatekeepers") to come to town in less than a month and deal fearlessly with an aspect of that country's legal and political system. While "The Gatekeepers" centered on the activities of Shin Bet, Israel's FBI, "Law" has a narrower but equally potent focus: how the legal system Israel uses to rule the occupied Palestinian territories was put into place and how it has functioned over the 40-plus years of its existence.
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