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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1985
Your editorial (June 13), "Following the Law," justified the murder-case reversals by the California Supreme Court, using the argument that the rules must be followed. As evidenced by the fact that the court had to reverse previous interpretations of the law by experienced judges on a lower level, the rules that you allude to are not as clear-cut as you would have us believe. For that matter, even the great philosopher Plato had difficulty defining the concept of justice itself. The four cases cited in your editorial were not all unanimous decisions, and, as usual, the justices aligned themselves as to their respective positions on the death penalty.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown indicated that he would support protecting public access to government records in a constitutional amendment to be voted on next fall, but still supports temporarily weakening the law that ensures public access to official documents. Brown's comments, which came in a statement released Wednesday evening, capped a wild day at the state Capitol, which had lawmakers scrambling to cope with the fallout of last week's vote to water down the law.  At Brown's urging, both houses approved a measure making local compliance with part of the state's public records laws optional.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Trayvon Martin's parents appeared before a task force in Florida on Tuesday to denounce the way the state's controversial "stand your ground" law can be used to protect aggressors. Tracy Martin and Sybrina Fulton believe that's what happened in the case of their son, who was unarmed when he was shot and killed in February by a neighborhood watch volunteer. "They need to amend these laws," Fulton said, according to the Orlando Sentinel, which was covering the task force hearing.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Planned Parenthood and others opponents of new Texas abortion restrictions have appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court to reinstate an injunction blocking portions of the law concerning doctors' admitting privileges. The appeal was filed with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, who gave state officials until next Tuesday to file a response before he rules. Scalia could rule on the injunction himself or refer the issue to the full court. Opponents said Monday that because of the new restrictions, a third of the state's licensed health centers have had to stop providing abortion services, including at least 14 providers, which will restrict abortion access to about 20,000 women annually.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
Amy Meyer was standing outside a slaughterhouse in Draper City, Utah, in February and said she saw what she had suspected: wounded animals being dragged to their deaths. Then she did what she had come for in this YouTube age and took out her cellphone to record it. Meyer was charged with a misdemeanor in connection with the incident, accused of violating a controversial new law in the Beehive State that forbids the recording of unauthorized photos or videos of agricultural operations.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
AVELLA, Pa. - About two years ago, Dr. Amy Pare began treating members of the Moten family and their neighbors from a working-class neighborhood less than half a mile from a natural gas well here. A plastic surgeon whose specialty includes skin cancer, Pare removed and biopsied quarter-size skin lesions from Jeannie Moten, 53, and her niece, only to find that the sores recurred. "The good news is that it wasn't cancer, and the bad news is that we have no idea what it is," Pare said.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
ATWATER, Calif. — The gigantic chicken coop at the JS West farm here is big enough to hangar a Boeing 747, and the clucks from 150,000 egg-laying hens make it almost as noisy as one. Jill Benson, whose family owns the place, is proud of the roomy cages, the clean, ventilated air and, yes, even the never-ending squawks from all those birds. "They're singing because they're happy," she said. If that's true, California voters can take some of the credit. Proposition 2, passed by a wide margin in 2008, requires chicken farmers to give their egg-laying birds enough room to stand and spread their wings.
OPINION
July 6, 2013 | By Rick Settersten
Our family exists at the crossroads of two of the most controversial aspects of American society - sexuality and race. We're two gay white men raising two black children - a girl, 13, and a boy, 10. Both children were adopted out of the foster care system as toddlers, and they both landed in that system because their birth mothers could not care for them. Each day we struggle with the legacies of their troubled beginnings, which gives us all the more joy as we see them thrive. Dan and I are a long-lived couple.
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