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NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald
Halloween is my favorite time of year. And I love to be scared. Over the years, I've been through my fair share of theme park mazes, independent haunted attractions and backyard spookfests. I even dress up every Halloween as a chainsaw-wielding maniac in a hockey mask and scare the neighborhood kids at the haunted house on our block. So I like to think I've seen it all - from the mundane to the extreme. But I've never experienced anything like McKamey Manor . > Photos: Inside the McKamey Manor backyard haunt in San Diego On Friday night I went through the backyard haunt tucked behind the three-bedroom, brick-and-stucco home of Russ and Carol McKamey in an otherwise ordinary San Diego subdivision near Poway.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Carol Crotta
A little education can go a long way toward maintaining and preserving an existing lawn, or establishing a new one, while minimizing water use. Southern California turfgrass experts provide some advice for saving water on your lawn. Choose the right turfgrass. Warm-season grasses need 20% less water than cool-season grasses - and rebound well with even less water. Some good choices are Bermudagrass, Buffalo grass, Kikuyu, St. Augustine, Seashore Paspalum and Zoysia. Water efficiently.
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NEWS
November 9, 2013
Question: When I moved to Northridge in 1951, every nursery carried flats of lippia, a cheap, tough, drought-resistant ground cover and lawn substitute. When I ordered it at a nursery, it took months to get, in spite of the fact that it is grown in Northern California, and it was expensive. Do you know why it has disappeared? Florence "Flip" Manne Sun Valley Answer: Florence, you are right -- getting rid of grass is a great goal. Traditional lawns take so many resources -- water, time, money, chemicals -- while contributing so little to the aesthetic of a property.
HOME & GARDEN
April 18, 2014 | By Carol Crotta
"This is the irony," mused homeowner Richard Turner as he looked over the newly installed and remarkably realistic-looking artificial lawn in his mid-Wilshire frontyard. "We grow grass to make the illusion that we don't live in a desert. Here I am, enhancing the illusion of a lawn that is the illusion we don't live in a desert. " And there's the rub. The iconic lush, green lawn - part and parcel of a mystique deeply embedded in the Southern California psyche and its landscape - has reached a crossroads.
SPORTS
June 12, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman
  Frank Miller, like most of us, has been a busy man during the playoffs. There was his day job at Trader Joe's, a substantial home clean-up job and the job of watching Chicago Blackhawks games. Naturally, something had to give. “The grass just got out of hand because ain't nobody got time for that,” the Park Ridge resident told Chicago's WGN Morning News. “Everybody started giving me [grief] about my grass, the neighbors, my co-workers. "So I was watching the Hawks playoffs and I noticed them growing their beards … so I decided I'm going to grow a playoff lawn.” It was a big hit until the city got involved.
OPINION
June 19, 2012
Re "Santa Monica curbs displays at city park," June 14 As an American, I cherish and defend our right to freely express our beliefs, whatever they may be, and I expect my government to ensure that we are able to do so without censor. But to set aside public park space for the sole purpose of erecting displays of either religious or atheist themes is not only impractical but wrong. Perhaps those who strongly desire to view the Nativity scenes could instead find some lawn space from among the dozens of Santa Monica churches or thousands of Christian property owners.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Alissa Walker
Sustainably minded Angelenos can head to Coldwater Canyon on Saturday and TreePeople's Center for Community Forestry, where the environmental nonprofit is hosting workshops on rainwater harvesting, lawn replacement and tree planting. For three decades, TreePeople has been training “citizen foresters” through its quarterly workshops . Like previous TreePeople workshops, this Saturday's event is free and open to the public, but reservations are required. Although the lessons can be applied to greening a backyard, TreePeople's goal is for participants to apply skills beyond their own property lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2010 | By Rich Connell, Los Angeles Times
L.A.'s new, showcase downtown community green, which turned brown and died within months, appears to be headed for a renewal. The chairwoman of the nonprofit Los Angeles Police Foundation said Friday that she has authorized the immediate release of funds to recondition the 1-acre lawn in the shadow of the new Los Angeles Police Department headquarters. The action came the day The Times published an article about the popular open space, which was a rare, lush expanse of grass when it was dedicated less than a year ago. "We'll figure out when to start work, and we'll get it done," said Cindy Miscikowski, the group's board chairwoman.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2012 | By David Lazarus
As a cat guy, I've always been baffled by the propensity of dog owners to just walk away from their pooch's leavings, especially when they happen to be on my lawn. Is it laziness? Thoughtlessness? Meanness? Well, if it's just too much hassle for dog owners to clean up after Rover, there's a new product called Doggie Doo Dissolver that aims to make things easier by, yes, dissolving those piles of left-behinds. Dog owners can walk away with a clear conscience. Here's a video of how it's supposed to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1986
In smoggy Los Angeles and environs, what goes up can come down dirty. That's why the owner of an aerial advertising and rental company decided to ground one of his fleet of 14 balloons used for rooftop advertisements and wash it on his Woodland Hills front lawn on Wednesday. "We wash them about once a year," said Mark Hays, the owner of Aerial Dimensions. "The beautiful Los Angeles air deposits quite a bit of dirt and dust."
OPINION
January 31, 2014
Re "Go native," Letters, Jan. 26 The cries for the obliteration of lawns in L.A. continue. The anti-lawn activists look at lawns while we use lawns. A green lawn can be walked upon and sat upon, and children and pets can play on it. It is an easy-to-maintain, utilitarian surface that is aesthetically restful. Native gardens, touted as water-friendly replacements, require the normal garden tasks of purchasing and installing plants, grooming, weeding and, yes, watering. A look around my hometown reveals native gardens that have been abandoned by owners, probably due to maintenance issues.
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Southern Californians have been having a lot of fun on Facebook this past week posting weather reports that show the local temperatures well up into the 70s and even the 80s. The wording with it usually goes something like this: You poor idiots living in colder climates, don't you wish you were smart like I am and lived here instead? We might have reason to be less thrilled about all this balminess a few months from now. With no rain on the horizon, it's pretty safe to call 2013 the driest year on record in Los Angeles.
OPINION
December 18, 2013
Re "Hard truths about water," Editorial, Dec. 15 In Los Angeles, up to 70% of water usage goes toward outdoor landscaping such as lawns. Reclaimed water is increasingly used, but it's still a drop in the bucket. Rebates are being paid for removing grass lawns and replacing them with low-water-usage or no-water alternatives. Grass lawns should be outlawed in new communities, and the rebate program should be massively expanded in established communities. The L.A. Department of Water and Power and other groups support expansion of "purple pipe" programs, which bring reclaimed water to communities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2013 | By Richard Winton
Actor Paul Walker's body was released Tuesday by the Los Angeles County coroner's office to Forest Lawn Mortuaries to make arrangements for his final resting place. Ed Winter, assistant chief of coroner's investigations, said the "Fast & Furious" actor's remains were turned over to Forest Lawn, where many of Hollywood's most famous stars are buried. Walker, 40, died Nov. 30 from a combination of traumatic injuries and burns after the Porsche crashed in Santa Clarita and erupted in flames, the county coroner's office reported last week.
SPORTS
November 19, 2013 | Chris Erskine
About 1:17 p.m. on a Friday, fall weather finally arrived - rode in on the jet stream, fortunately, because if you have ever tried to get anywhere in L.A. on a Friday afternoon, a car is the last vessel you'd want to use. Half the attendees at our tailgate party arrived by bicycle, the only mode of transit that seems to work in this town anymore. The lack of an NFL franchise makes me feel deprived and fortunate all at once. Deprived because there is no such thing as too much football.
NEWS
November 9, 2013
Question: When I moved to Northridge in 1951, every nursery carried flats of lippia, a cheap, tough, drought-resistant ground cover and lawn substitute. When I ordered it at a nursery, it took months to get, in spite of the fact that it is grown in Northern California, and it was expensive. Do you know why it has disappeared? Florence "Flip" Manne Sun Valley Answer: Florence, you are right -- getting rid of grass is a great goal. Traditional lawns take so many resources -- water, time, money, chemicals -- while contributing so little to the aesthetic of a property.
OPINION
November 16, 2011 | By Emily Green
Whatever the accomplishments of Occupy L.A. when it finally decamps — or gets evicted — from around City Hall, one positive achievement is already clear: It has killed the lawn. The Times' editorial board has harrumphed about the taxpayer expense of replacing one of downtown's "rare green spaces," and it worries that the "majestic figs" are at risk. Last week, the Department of Recreation and Parks sent an aggrieved letter to the mayor about signs nailed to trees, broken sprinkler heads and compacted soil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1999 | STEVE CHAWKINS
Two guys from the old neighborhood run into each other after years in the suburbs. "So how do you like it out here, Sam?" "I'll tell you, Bill. I felt sort of overwhelmed until I got myself a paramour." "A paramour? Does your wife know?" "Of course she knows." "And she doesn't mind that you have a paramour?" "Why would she mind what I cut the grass with?" Come the new millennium, this is one dumb joke that will wither away and die.
WORLD
October 16, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Irma Lopez, a Mazatec Indian, waited to receive attention at a medical clinic in Oaxaca, but her labor pains became overwhelming. Spurned by the nurses, she retreated outdoors - and abruptly gave birth to a baby boy on the hospital lawn. A few days later, it was revealed that two other pregnant indigenous women had also been turned away from Oaxaca hospitals, one of whom also delivered on the lawn, and that a fourth woman had been forced to have her baby on the reception floor at a hospital in Puebla.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
In the farmland of northwestern Missouri, a 2012 rape case that never went to trial has put tiny Maryville under siege from state politicians, national journalists and a hackers' collective pledging retribution. Early on Jan. 8, 2012, Melinda Coleman, a widow who had recently moved to town with her four children, discovered her 14-year-old daughter, Daisy, sprawled outside her home in 22-degree weather. The girl was incoherent, clad only in a T-shirt and sweatpants, her hair brittle from the cold.
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