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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1996 | TIM MAY
Vehicles should not be considered lawn art, the city of San Fernando says. Moving to crack down on residents who park vehicles on unpaved surfaces in residential areas, the City Council recently proposed an ordinance making it illegal to park in yards. "It's just not attractive to have vehicles parked on the lawn," said Howard Miura, director of the city's Community Development Department.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Carol Crotta
A little education can go a long way toward maintaining and preserving an existing lawn, or establishing a new one, while minimizing water use. Southern California turfgrass experts provide some advice for saving water on your lawn. Choose the right turfgrass. Warm-season grasses need 20% less water than cool-season grasses - and rebound well with even less water. Some good choices are Bermudagrass, Buffalo grass, Kikuyu, St. Augustine, Seashore Paspalum and Zoysia. Water efficiently.
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OPINION
January 31, 2014
Re "Go native," Letters, Jan. 26 The cries for the obliteration of lawns in L.A. continue. The anti-lawn activists look at lawns while we use lawns. A green lawn can be walked upon and sat upon, and children and pets can play on it. It is an easy-to-maintain, utilitarian surface that is aesthetically restful. Native gardens, touted as water-friendly replacements, require the normal garden tasks of purchasing and installing plants, grooming, weeding and, yes, watering. A look around my hometown reveals native gardens that have been abandoned by owners, probably due to maintenance issues.
HOME & GARDEN
April 18, 2014 | By Carol Crotta
"This is the irony," mused homeowner Richard Turner as he looked over the newly installed and remarkably realistic-looking artificial lawn in his mid-Wilshire frontyard. "We grow grass to make the illusion that we don't live in a desert. Here I am, enhancing the illusion of a lawn that is the illusion we don't live in a desert. " And there's the rub. The iconic lush, green lawn - part and parcel of a mystique deeply embedded in the Southern California psyche and its landscape - has reached a crossroads.
OPINION
December 18, 2013
Re "Hard truths about water," Editorial, Dec. 15 In Los Angeles, up to 70% of water usage goes toward outdoor landscaping such as lawns. Reclaimed water is increasingly used, but it's still a drop in the bucket. Rebates are being paid for removing grass lawns and replacing them with low-water-usage or no-water alternatives. Grass lawns should be outlawed in new communities, and the rebate program should be massively expanded in established communities. The L.A. Department of Water and Power and other groups support expansion of "purple pipe" programs, which bring reclaimed water to communities.
OPINION
November 10, 1991
I read with great amusement your article on lawn parking. Finally this blight on our city has come to the attention of our city councilmen! They will perhaps now consider meaningful enforcement of ordinances that have been on the books for years. I hope that this enforcement will include the many "parking lots" that were illegally paved over front lawns in many fine neighborhoods. GERALD O. HAYMAN, Los Angeles
OPINION
September 13, 2003
Re "Water Conservationists Step on the Grass," Sept. 6: With the prospect of another water shortage, isn't it about time to consider using "gray water" for landscape irrigation? Gray water is the water from showers, sinks, washers and other nonsewage sources. Water would be routed from showers to a storage tank. Soap and other particles would settle out, and the water would be given a minimum chemical treatment, if necessary. This water would then be pumped out to water lawns and other landscaping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Customers buying sod from Green Landscape Nursery in Saugus may tire of the refrain, but nursery owner Richard Green says the advice he plants in their minds is solid. "When people buy sod, I tell the people to keep it wet, wet, wet . . . and when they're walking out the door I tell them to keep it wet, wet, wet," Green said Friday. "I tell them to water it four to five times a day throughout the day . . . and on a day like today that is absolutely required . . . or else you'll lose it."
NEWS
July 8, 1989 | CURT SUPLEE, The Washington Post
A lawn without a lawn ornament is like a duck without galoshes--functional, but not really arresting. Few humans can resist the urge to personalize undifferentiated space. And ever since the grand lawn ornaments of antiquity--Stonehenge, the Pyramid of Khufu, the Easter Island heads--our yard embellishments have combined individual expression with prevailing values.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday approved a proposal to give city inspectors more power to combat the problem of cars parked illegally in front yards. The newly minted ordinance allows city inspectors to ticket the owners of the vehicles. In the past, inspectors from the city departments of transportation and building and safety could only ticket the homeowners involved in the offenses.
OPINION
January 31, 2014
Re "Go native," Letters, Jan. 26 The cries for the obliteration of lawns in L.A. continue. The anti-lawn activists look at lawns while we use lawns. A green lawn can be walked upon and sat upon, and children and pets can play on it. It is an easy-to-maintain, utilitarian surface that is aesthetically restful. Native gardens, touted as water-friendly replacements, require the normal garden tasks of purchasing and installing plants, grooming, weeding and, yes, watering. A look around my hometown reveals native gardens that have been abandoned by owners, probably due to maintenance issues.
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Southern Californians have been having a lot of fun on Facebook this past week posting weather reports that show the local temperatures well up into the 70s and even the 80s. The wording with it usually goes something like this: You poor idiots living in colder climates, don't you wish you were smart like I am and lived here instead? We might have reason to be less thrilled about all this balminess a few months from now. With no rain on the horizon, it's pretty safe to call 2013 the driest year on record in Los Angeles.
OPINION
December 18, 2013
Re "Hard truths about water," Editorial, Dec. 15 In Los Angeles, up to 70% of water usage goes toward outdoor landscaping such as lawns. Reclaimed water is increasingly used, but it's still a drop in the bucket. Rebates are being paid for removing grass lawns and replacing them with low-water-usage or no-water alternatives. Grass lawns should be outlawed in new communities, and the rebate program should be massively expanded in established communities. The L.A. Department of Water and Power and other groups support expansion of "purple pipe" programs, which bring reclaimed water to communities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2013 | By Richard Winton
Actor Paul Walker's body was released Tuesday by the Los Angeles County coroner's office to Forest Lawn Mortuaries to make arrangements for his final resting place. Ed Winter, assistant chief of coroner's investigations, said the "Fast & Furious" actor's remains were turned over to Forest Lawn, where many of Hollywood's most famous stars are buried. Walker, 40, died Nov. 30 from a combination of traumatic injuries and burns after the Porsche crashed in Santa Clarita and erupted in flames, the county coroner's office reported last week.
SPORTS
November 19, 2013 | Chris Erskine
About 1:17 p.m. on a Friday, fall weather finally arrived - rode in on the jet stream, fortunately, because if you have ever tried to get anywhere in L.A. on a Friday afternoon, a car is the last vessel you'd want to use. Half the attendees at our tailgate party arrived by bicycle, the only mode of transit that seems to work in this town anymore. The lack of an NFL franchise makes me feel deprived and fortunate all at once. Deprived because there is no such thing as too much football.
NEWS
November 9, 2013
Question: When I moved to Northridge in 1951, every nursery carried flats of lippia, a cheap, tough, drought-resistant ground cover and lawn substitute. When I ordered it at a nursery, it took months to get, in spite of the fact that it is grown in Northern California, and it was expensive. Do you know why it has disappeared? Florence "Flip" Manne Sun Valley Answer: Florence, you are right -- getting rid of grass is a great goal. Traditional lawns take so many resources -- water, time, money, chemicals -- while contributing so little to the aesthetic of a property.
NEWS
May 22, 1986
The Planning Commission has endorsed an ordinance to prohibit parking on front-yard lawns. The commission's action last week sends the widely debated measure to the council, which will review the law and decide its fate. The proposed ordinance was drafted in February after several residents complained that parking on front-yard lawns hurts property values and detracts from the city's image.
HOME & GARDEN
August 5, 2004
I enjoyed "The Proper Look of Paradise" (July 22) but question why writer Emily Green referred to Marathon grass as "water efficient." Marathon is a tall-fescue type of grass. But many grasses use far less water, including St. Augustine, Bermuda and Buffalo. The latter requires water only about once a month. Raymond Tam Arcadia Green responds: There are less water-hungry varieties, but Marathon is more efficient than common grasses. I was showing that the conservation experiment wasn't unfairly skewed against a conventional garden.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
In the farmland of northwestern Missouri, a 2012 rape case that never went to trial has put tiny Maryville under siege from state politicians, national journalists and a hackers' collective pledging retribution. Early on Jan. 8, 2012, Melinda Coleman, a widow who had recently moved to town with her four children, discovered her 14-year-old daughter, Daisy, sprawled outside her home in 22-degree weather. The girl was incoherent, clad only in a T-shirt and sweatpants, her hair brittle from the cold.
WORLD
October 16, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Irma Lopez, a Mazatec Indian, waited to receive attention at a medical clinic in Oaxaca, but her labor pains became overwhelming. Spurned by the nurses, she retreated outdoors - and abruptly gave birth to a baby boy on the hospital lawn. A few days later, it was revealed that two other pregnant indigenous women had also been turned away from Oaxaca hospitals, one of whom also delivered on the lawn, and that a fourth woman had been forced to have her baby on the reception floor at a hospital in Puebla.
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