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Lawrence A Franklin

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September 30, 2005 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
A former Pentagon analyst accused of playing a central role in a scheme to channel Defense Department secrets to Israel plans to plead guilty to one or more charges, U.S. officials said Thursday. Lawrence A. Franklin, 58, was indicted in August on charges of giving classified information to top lobbyists at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, or AIPAC, one of Washington's most influential lobbying organizations, and to an official at the Israeli embassy in Washington.
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NATIONAL
January 21, 2006 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
A former Pentagon analyst who admitted scheming with two pro-Israel lobbyists and an Israeli Embassy official to influence U.S. policy in the Middle East was sentenced to more than 12 years in prison Friday for disclosing classified information. The sentencing of Lawrence A. Franklin, 59, of Kearneysville, W.Va.
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NATIONAL
January 21, 2006 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
A former Pentagon analyst who admitted scheming with two pro-Israel lobbyists and an Israeli Embassy official to influence U.S. policy in the Middle East was sentenced to more than 12 years in prison Friday for disclosing classified information. The sentencing of Lawrence A. Franklin, 59, of Kearneysville, W.Va.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2005 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
A former Pentagon analyst accused of playing a central role in a scheme to channel Defense Department secrets to Israel plans to plead guilty to one or more charges, U.S. officials said Thursday. Lawrence A. Franklin, 58, was indicted in August on charges of giving classified information to top lobbyists at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, or AIPAC, one of Washington's most influential lobbying organizations, and to an official at the Israeli embassy in Washington.
NATIONAL
May 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
A Pentagon analyst previously charged with leaking top-secret information to a pro-Israel group was charged Tuesday with taking classified U.S. documents out of the Washington area to his West Virginia residence. Lawrence A. Franklin, 58, was not authorized to take such documents to his home in Kearneysville, according to the federal charge issued along with an arrest warrant by U.S. Atty. Thomas E. Johnston.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2009 | Greg Miller
Rep. Jane Harman denied Monday that she had contacted the Justice Department to seek leniency for employees of a pro-Israeli lobbying organization under investigation for espionage. The Venice Democrat also said that she has never been told that she was involved in the FBI's probe of former officials of the American Israeli Public Affairs Committee.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2009 | Josh Meyer
The Justice Department asked a judge Friday to drop espionage-related charges against two pro-Israel lobbyists, a move expected to end a politically sensitive case that focused on whether U.S. secrets had been leaked. Prosecutors said recent court decisions would have made the case hard to win and forced disclosure of large amounts of classified information.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2005 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
A powerful pro-Israel lobbying organization has dismissed its long-time policy director and a top analyst, signaling that prosecutors may be close to resolving a probe into whether the group obtained and shared classified U.S. information with Israel, people familiar with the case said Thursday. Lawyers for the two men denied that their clients had broken any laws or engaged in any improper behavior.
NATIONAL
October 6, 2005 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
A former Pentagon analyst on Iran pleaded guilty Wednesday to conspiring to channel classified Defense Department secrets to an Israeli Embassy official and a pro-Israel lobbying group. Lawrence A. Franklin, 58, told the court he did so out of frustration with a particular U.S. policy in the Middle East, without going into detail. He faces as much as 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.
OPINION
May 7, 2009
The decision by the Justice Department to drop its case against two former employees of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee was a wise one. The case, misconceived from the start, created more problems than it solved. The saga began more than four years ago when the government accused the two AIPAC staff members, Steven J. Rosen and Keith Weissman, of receiving secret information about U.S.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2006 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors, trumpeting the indictment last year of two pro-Israel lobbyists who allegedly obtained U.S. defense secrets from a former Pentagon analyst, said the men had crossed a "clear line in the law." But that line is turning out to be not so clear, and the government's high-profile case might be unraveling. A federal judge is considering throwing out or reducing the charges before the ex-lobbyists' trial begins this month. Last week, U.S. District Judge T.S.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2006 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Lawyers for two lobbyists accused of conspiring to obtain secret defense information said Friday that they intended to prove that senior administration officials, including Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, provided the lobbyists with some of the sensitive information. Ratcheting up their defense against espionage charges, the lawyers, representing former employees of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, got tentative clearance from U.S. District Judge T.S.
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