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Lawrence B Gibbs

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NEWS
February 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
Lawrence B. Gibbs, commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service for 2 1/2 years, said Friday that he will leave the post on March 4. His resignation was announced by spokesman Scott Waffle, who said the commissioner was not ready to disclose what he will do after leaving the position. Gibbs, 50, is highly regarded by congressional leaders with whom he deals regularly. Gibbs took office on Aug. 4, 1986, succeeding Roscoe L. Egger Jr.
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NEWS
February 22, 1989
The nation's chief tax collector told Congress that the system of federal tax penalties has swollen into a hodgepodge the public finds hard to understand and the IRS difficult to administer. In 1954, the law carried 14 penalties designed to encourage taxpayer compliance, but now there are 150, Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Lawrence B. Gibbs told a House Ways and Means subcommittee.
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NEWS
February 22, 1989
The nation's chief tax collector told Congress that the system of federal tax penalties has swollen into a hodgepodge the public finds hard to understand and the IRS difficult to administer. In 1954, the law carried 14 penalties designed to encourage taxpayer compliance, but now there are 150, Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Lawrence B. Gibbs told a House Ways and Means subcommittee.
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
Lawrence B. Gibbs, commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service for 2 1/2 years, said Friday that he will leave the post on March 4. His resignation was announced by spokesman Scott Waffle, who said the commissioner was not ready to disclose what he will do after leaving the position. Gibbs, 50, is highly regarded by congressional leaders with whom he deals regularly. Gibbs took office on Aug. 4, 1986, succeeding Roscoe L. Egger Jr.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
The Internal Revenue Service last year ordered Debra Corwin, an agent in the Los Angeles office of its inspection service, to pose as a worker at a Kansas City IRS center in an effort to discover whether another employee was part of a murderous band of crack dealers. IRS officials hoped that Corwin, who is white, could establish a close rapport with the other worker, who is black. So they told her to spend time in a Pasadena tanning salon and to braid her hair in cornrows.
NEWS
June 3, 1986
Dallas attorney Lawrence B. Gibbs was picked by President Reagan to head the Internal Revenue Service. If his nomination is confirmed by the Senate, Gibbs would succeed Roscoe L. Egger Jr., who resigned. Gibbs, a partner in a Dallas law firm since 1976, worked at the IRS from 1972 until 1975, first as deputy chief counsel and acting chief counsel and later as assistant commissioner.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | Associated Press
The Internal Revenue Service said Thursday that it was asking charities for help in reminding contributors that they cannot claim a full tax deduction for a gift if they get something in return. Under IRS rules, for example, taxpayers claiming deductions for the purchase of Girl Scout cookies would have to subtract the value of the cookies from the amount they paid in order to arrive at the proper deduction. In his notice to 400,000 tax-exempt charities, IRS Commissioner Lawrence B.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | Associated Press
The Senate on Wednesday confirmed Dallas tax lawyer Lawrence B. Gibbs to be the new commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service, a job that will require implementing a sweeping tax-overhaul law being written by Congress. The lawmakers approved Gibbs on a voice vote with no debate, sending him from a job where he advised people on how to avoid paying taxes to the role of the nation's chief tax collector. Gibbs replaces Roscoe L. Egger Jr., who retired April 30.
NEWS
January 4, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service said today the agency has beefed up personnel in a major effort to ensure that taxpayers receive the right answers when they call the IRS. One of every four answers from the IRS were wrong last year, Commissioner Lawrence B. Gibbs acknowledged, "and we've gone back to the drawing board . . . to try to improve accuracy levels." The IRS has increased the number of supervisors to oversee employees who answer technical questions by phone, Gibbs said.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
The Internal Revenue Service last year ordered Debra Corwin, an agent in the Los Angeles office of its inspection service, to pose as a worker at a Kansas City IRS center in an effort to discover whether another employee was part of a murderous band of crack dealers. IRS officials hoped that Corwin, who is white, could establish a close rapport with the other worker, who is black. So they told her to spend time in a Pasadena tanning salon and to braid her hair in cornrows.
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