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Lawrence Durrell

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NEWS
November 9, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawrence Durrell, the India-born British novelist best known for his "Alexandria Quartet," has died at his home in Southern France. He was 78. Durrell died Wednesday in the village of Sommieres, where he had lived for more than 30 years, his family announced Thursday. The family gave no cause of death, but Durrell had acknowledged in recent years that he suffered from emphysema. Born of British parents in India on Feb.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2011 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
George Whitman, the legendary founder of the Paris bookshop and literary institution Shakespeare & Co., died Wednesday. He was 98. The Left Bank bookshop was closed Wednesday, and a note on the door said Whitman had suffered a stroke a few months earlier. He "died peacefully at home in the apartment above his bookshop," the letter said. On Wednesday night, people stopped to leave notes, flowers and candles along the ground and covering the window of the shop, now run by his daughter, Sylvia.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2000
Sabri Tahir, 76, roguish Turkish Cypriot who was immortalized in the Lawrence Durrell book "Bitter Lemons." Durrell, the India-born son of British citizens, lived in the mountainside village of Bellapais in northern Cyprus during the 1950s, a tense period when armed groups challenged British colonial rule and pressed for union with Greece. "Bitter Lemons," published in 1957, was Durrell's impressionistic account of his life there.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1939, with Europe already sinking into World War II, 46-year-old Henry Miller left Paris, knowing that a cycle of his life had come to an end. As an expatriate in Paris he'd found his voice, and published the novels — "Tropic of Cancer," "Black Spring" and "Tropic of Capricorn" — which made his name. He'd had his legendarily steamy and dangerous affair with Anais Nin, and George Orwell had fired a salute on his behalf, hailing him as "a Whitman among the corpses." Miller, although banned in America, had arrived, and then, restless as ever, he accepted the invitation of another writer, his friend Lawrence Durrell, to visit Greece and the island of Corfu.
BOOKS
October 27, 1985 | Brian Stonehill, Stonehill, who teaches at Pomona College, has written a study of "The Self-Conscious Novel." and
"Quinx," as its title implies, is the fifth and final novel in a sequence that Lawrence Durrell has been building for the last 10 years, under the title "The Avignon Quintet." The 73-year-old major British novelist and poet has written 27 books, the best known of which comprise "The Alexandria Quartet," an ornate and stylish tetralogy first published between 1957 and 1960, and still widely read.
BOOKS
June 21, 1998 | PATRICIA STORACE, Patricia Storace is the author of "Heredity," a book of poems, and "Dinner With Persephone," a travel memoir about Greece. She recently was honored with the Runciman Award
"My thinking is colored by the fact that I am a colonial," Lawrence Durrell, the British expatriate, civil servant and writer fashionable in the 1950s and 1960s for his travel books about Greece and his novels set in Egypt, Greece and France, once remarked.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1939, with Europe already sinking into World War II, 46-year-old Henry Miller left Paris, knowing that a cycle of his life had come to an end. As an expatriate in Paris he'd found his voice, and published the novels — "Tropic of Cancer," "Black Spring" and "Tropic of Capricorn" — which made his name. He'd had his legendarily steamy and dangerous affair with Anais Nin, and George Orwell had fired a salute on his behalf, hailing him as "a Whitman among the corpses." Miller, although banned in America, had arrived, and then, restless as ever, he accepted the invitation of another writer, his friend Lawrence Durrell, to visit Greece and the island of Corfu.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2001
John Balzar's amusing but critical remarks on Fay Weldon's forthcoming novel ("Sold! A Literary Soul, Now Mud," Commentary, Sept. 5) might have raised Dr. Samuel Johnson's eyebrows over 250 years ago. That literary giant himself growled that he counted any writer a great fool who did not write for money. Jane Austen said that although she liked fame, she loved "pewter" more. And those writers kept in groceries in Paris in the grim days before and after World War II, like Anais Nin, Henry Miller and Lawrence Durrell, contracted to write pornographic novels for Maurice Girodias' Olympia Press of 10 chapters, 20 pages each, with two sex scenes per chapter, none of them repeated, making 20 "hot" episodes in all. At least they didn't sign their names to those books, let alone boast of it as Weldon does, laughing all the way, she hopes, to the bank.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
Lawrence Durrell, the British novelist whose works evoked the exotic imagery of the Mediterranean, has died at his home in southern France, his family said today. He was 78. The cause of his death on Wednesday was not disclosed. Durrell had been fatigued for about two weeks, a family member said. Durrell told the Washington Post in 1986 that he was suffering from emphysema.
BOOKS
July 12, 1998
Editor's Note: Book Review received half a dozen letters taking issue with Patricia Storace's recent review of Ian MacNiven's biography of Lawrence Durrell. Space constraints prevent us from publishing all of them. . . To the Editor: Patricia Storace's review of Ian MacNiven's recent biography, "Lawrence Durrell" (Book Review, June 21), is an unremitting pan of Lawrence Durrell, the man and the writer, not to mention MacNiven's biography. It should not be allowed to stand without comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Nick Owchar
The Templars were an elite taskforce -- consider them the Green Berets of the Middle Ages. They were known for their service to the pope, their fierce determination to wrest Jerusalem from the enemy, their great wealth and, like many groups, their secrecy. For a group so secret, though, they've received an incredible amount of attention both in the years BDB (before Dan Brown) and ever since. Michael Haag, who has occasionally contributed to our pages, decided to weigh in and settle the misinformation bandied about by various recent books with his own, "The Templars: The History & the Myth" (Harper: 384 pp., $15.99 paper)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2001
John Balzar's amusing but critical remarks on Fay Weldon's forthcoming novel ("Sold! A Literary Soul, Now Mud," Commentary, Sept. 5) might have raised Dr. Samuel Johnson's eyebrows over 250 years ago. That literary giant himself growled that he counted any writer a great fool who did not write for money. Jane Austen said that although she liked fame, she loved "pewter" more. And those writers kept in groceries in Paris in the grim days before and after World War II, like Anais Nin, Henry Miller and Lawrence Durrell, contracted to write pornographic novels for Maurice Girodias' Olympia Press of 10 chapters, 20 pages each, with two sex scenes per chapter, none of them repeated, making 20 "hot" episodes in all. At least they didn't sign their names to those books, let alone boast of it as Weldon does, laughing all the way, she hopes, to the bank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2000
Sabri Tahir, 76, roguish Turkish Cypriot who was immortalized in the Lawrence Durrell book "Bitter Lemons." Durrell, the India-born son of British citizens, lived in the mountainside village of Bellapais in northern Cyprus during the 1950s, a tense period when armed groups challenged British colonial rule and pressed for union with Greece. "Bitter Lemons," published in 1957, was Durrell's impressionistic account of his life there.
BOOKS
May 30, 1999 | GEORGE ARMSTRONG, George Armstrong was for 28 years the Rome correspondent for the Guardian and was a regular contributor to the Economist
"Sicily," writes Lawrence Durrell in "Sicilian Carousel," "is not just an island, it is a sub-continent whose variegated history and variety of landscapes simply overwhelms the traveller who has not set aside at least three months to deal with it and its overlapping cultures and civilizations." From its position at the crossroads of the Mediterranean, Sicily has lured travelers to its shores for thousands of years. Some have stayed days or months; some have stayed much longer.
BOOKS
July 12, 1998
Editor's Note: Book Review received half a dozen letters taking issue with Patricia Storace's recent review of Ian MacNiven's biography of Lawrence Durrell. Space constraints prevent us from publishing all of them. . . To the Editor: Patricia Storace's review of Ian MacNiven's recent biography, "Lawrence Durrell" (Book Review, June 21), is an unremitting pan of Lawrence Durrell, the man and the writer, not to mention MacNiven's biography. It should not be allowed to stand without comment.
BOOKS
June 21, 1998 | PATRICIA STORACE, Patricia Storace is the author of "Heredity," a book of poems, and "Dinner With Persephone," a travel memoir about Greece. She recently was honored with the Runciman Award
"My thinking is colored by the fact that I am a colonial," Lawrence Durrell, the British expatriate, civil servant and writer fashionable in the 1950s and 1960s for his travel books about Greece and his novels set in Egypt, Greece and France, once remarked.
BOOKS
July 7, 1991 | Molly Giles, Giles recently won the National Book Critics Circle Citation for excellence in book reviewing
Henry Miller believed in luck--all his long life he consulted astrologers, graphologists, phrenologists and numerologists--but his own personal timing was off. Good things came to him, but they came either too early or too late. He missed being born on Christmas by one day (his mother, he complained, had a "clutching womb"). He lost the Lost Generation by a decade and arrived in Paris long after the more fashionable expatriate writers had decamped. He fell in love with impeccable illogic--his first love was a girl he didn't dare touch, his last a girl who wouldn't touch him on a dare, and the two most important loves of his life, June Smith and Anais Nin, were girls who preferred to touch each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Nick Owchar
The Templars were an elite taskforce -- consider them the Green Berets of the Middle Ages. They were known for their service to the pope, their fierce determination to wrest Jerusalem from the enemy, their great wealth and, like many groups, their secrecy. For a group so secret, though, they've received an incredible amount of attention both in the years BDB (before Dan Brown) and ever since. Michael Haag, who has occasionally contributed to our pages, decided to weigh in and settle the misinformation bandied about by various recent books with his own, "The Templars: The History & the Myth" (Harper: 384 pp., $15.99 paper)
BOOKS
July 7, 1991 | Molly Giles, Giles recently won the National Book Critics Circle Citation for excellence in book reviewing
Henry Miller believed in luck--all his long life he consulted astrologers, graphologists, phrenologists and numerologists--but his own personal timing was off. Good things came to him, but they came either too early or too late. He missed being born on Christmas by one day (his mother, he complained, had a "clutching womb"). He lost the Lost Generation by a decade and arrived in Paris long after the more fashionable expatriate writers had decamped. He fell in love with impeccable illogic--his first love was a girl he didn't dare touch, his last a girl who wouldn't touch him on a dare, and the two most important loves of his life, June Smith and Anais Nin, were girls who preferred to touch each other.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawrence Durrell, the India-born British novelist best known for his "Alexandria Quartet," has died at his home in Southern France. He was 78. Durrell died Wednesday in the village of Sommieres, where he had lived for more than 30 years, his family announced Thursday. The family gave no cause of death, but Durrell had acknowledged in recent years that he suffered from emphysema. Born of British parents in India on Feb.
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