Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLawrence Fiato
IN THE NEWS

Lawrence Fiato

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Two former Mafia brothers who went undercover for the government and collected evidence against the Los Angeles crime family had their jail sentences suspended Wednesday for work that authorities said dealt a "knockout punch" to the mob in Southern California. Craig Anthony Fiato, 45, and Lawrence Fiato, 34, longtime organized crime associates who were among the first government informants to be considered for induction into the Mafia, were sentenced to five years' probation and fines of $1,000 each for the illegal loan-sharking activities that first led them into the underworld.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Two former Mafia brothers who went undercover for the government and collected evidence against the Los Angeles crime family had their jail sentences suspended Wednesday for work that authorities said dealt a "knockout punch" to the mob in Southern California. Craig Anthony Fiato, 45, and Lawrence Fiato, 34, longtime organized crime associates who were among the first government informants to be considered for induction into the Mafia, were sentenced to five years' probation and fines of $1,000 each for the illegal loan-sharking activities that first led them into the underworld.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1988
Two brothers who infiltrated the Los Angeles Mafia and provided key evidence that helped convict most of the crime family's top leadership pleaded not guilty Tuesday in Los Angeles federal court to an extortion conspiracy charge. Craig Anthony Fiato and Lawrence Fiato, who secretly recorded dozens of conversations with reputed mob boss Peter J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A man accused of dealing cocaine for the Los Angeles Mafia testified Monday that he offered to hire "some weightlifters" from the East Coast to help an undercover FBI agent deal with threats from two alleged cocaine suppliers. But Robert D'Agostino, who later admitted to selling 83 grams of cocaine to the FBI agent, said he didn't know at the time that the two alleged suppliers were actually undercover government informants.
NEWS
September 19, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Even for a case in which the bizarre has become somewhat commonplace, the legal drama about to be played out in Judge Lance A. Ito's courtroom stands out: O.J. Simpson's defense lawyers are hoping that the testimony of a former Mafia muscleman turned government informant will help them win their case. Sources close to the defense say that Simpson's attorneys want to offer testimony from C.
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Seven alleged mobsters, including Peter J. Milano, the reputed Mafia boss who led a move to strengthen the Los Angeles crime family's grip on loan-sharking, bookmaking and narcotics, pleaded guilty Tuesday in a case that officials said may have sounded the death knell for organized crime in Southern California. Milano pleaded guilty to conducting a racketeering enterprise that federal authorities have identified as a newly revitalized wing of La Cosa Nostra in Los Angeles.
NEWS
September 20, 1995 | ANDREA FORD and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Trying to close their case with a bang, lawyers for O.J. Simpson called one of the case's lead investigators to the witness stand Tuesday and accused him of lying about the reasons for going to Simpson's house after the murders--a contention that received a boost from an FBI agent but sputtered when a pair of organized crime informants were asked about it.
MAGAZINE
March 6, 1988 | JAMES BAMFORD, James Bamford, author of "The Puzzle Palace," an examination of the highly secret National Security Agency, specializes in investigative writing. He is currently at work on a new book
THE MOB IS ON TRIAL in Southern California. After four years of investigation by the FBI and the Justice Department's Organized Crime Strike Force, a dozen men--members of the Los Angeles branch of the Cosa Nostra, according to the government--were scheduled to take their places last week at the defendants' table in federal court. Nearly a year ago, their indictment was announced with great fanfare--the most significant organized-crime case on the West Coast in a decade, said the U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|