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BUSINESS
February 2, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon's Rawl to Retire This Year: Lawrence Rawl will retire as chairman and chief executive of Exxon Corp., the largest oil company in the United States, according to a proxy statement filed Jan. 29 with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Rawl, who has guided the Irving, Tex., company since becoming chairman and CEO in 1987, will reach the company's mandatory retirement age of 65 in May, the proxy statement said.
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BUSINESS
March 20, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exxon Corp. on Monday called "premature" a request that company Chairman Lawrence G. Rawl meet with institutional shareholders to discuss Exxon's environmental record and investigations into oil spills, the second time the company has sidestepped such a request.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Managers of three major public pension funds demanded stronger action from Exxon Corp. Chairman Lawrence G. Rawl on Wednesday to correct the company's poor and potentially costly environmental record. But they received no commitments in a meeting with Exxon executives. The ambiguous response disappointed the managers of funds in California, New York and Massachusetts that together hold about 14 million shares of Exxon stock, a little more than 1% of the total shares outstanding.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One observer is calling it "Larry & Me." Exxon Corp. Chairman Lawrence G. Rawl has already turned down one request for a meeting with New York City Comptroller Elizabeth Holtzman, who manages five city pension plans that own Exxon stock, to discuss the company's environmental record.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Managers of three major public pension funds demanded stronger action from Exxon Corp. Chairman Lawrence G. Rawl on Wednesday to correct the company's poor and potentially costly environmental record. But they received no commitments in a meeting with Exxon executives. The ambiguous response disappointed the managers of funds in California, New York and Massachusetts that together hold about 14 million shares of Exxon stock, a little more than 1% of the total shares outstanding.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1989 | KAREN TUMULTY and MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writers
After an Exxon tanker spilled 240,000 barrels of oil into the Alaskan waterway that provides his living, Robin Dexter took only a couple of days to decide what needed to be done. The 41-year-old fisherman quickly bought 10 shares of Exxon Corp. stock, and Thursday he got the chance to vent his frustration with the management that now must answer to him. "Until I get a livelihood again, I'm being forced into the oil industry," he told company executives and 2,000 shareholders at Exxon's annual meeting.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon's Rawl to Retire This Year: Lawrence Rawl will retire as chairman and chief executive of Exxon Corp., the largest oil company in the United States, according to a proxy statement filed Jan. 29 with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Rawl, who has guided the Irving, Tex., company since becoming chairman and CEO in 1987, will reach the company's mandatory retirement age of 65 in May, the proxy statement said.
NEWS
August 27, 1986 | Associated Press
Clifton C. Garvin Jr. will step down as Exxon Corp.'s board chairman and chief executive officer on Jan. 1, 1987, Exxon announced today. Lawrence G. Rawl was elected by Exxon's board of directors to take his place, the company said. Rawl has been serving as president of Exxon since May, 1985, and will reach mandatory retirement age in December.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exxon Corp. on Monday called "premature" a request that company Chairman Lawrence G. Rawl meet with institutional shareholders to discuss Exxon's environmental record and investigations into oil spills, the second time the company has sidestepped such a request.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One observer is calling it "Larry & Me." Exxon Corp. Chairman Lawrence G. Rawl has already turned down one request for a meeting with New York City Comptroller Elizabeth Holtzman, who manages five city pension plans that own Exxon stock, to discuss the company's environmental record.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1989 | KAREN TUMULTY and MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writers
After an Exxon tanker spilled 240,000 barrels of oil into the Alaskan waterway that provides his living, Robin Dexter took only a couple of days to decide what needed to be done. The 41-year-old fisherman quickly bought 10 shares of Exxon Corp. stock, and Thursday he got the chance to vent his frustration with the management that now must answer to him. "Until I get a livelihood again, I'm being forced into the oil industry," he told company executives and 2,000 shareholders at Exxon's annual meeting.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1989 | From United Press International
Exxon Corp. Chairman Lawrence G. Rawl said he doubts serious harm has been done to his company's public image since the Alaskan oil spill that has cost nearly $1.3 billion in cleanup bills. "I think we still have a good image around the world," Rawl said at a meeting in San Antonio of the Society of Petroleum Engineers late Monday. "People, especially along the Gulf Coast, realize that accidents can happen."
BUSINESS
March 26, 1985 | Associated Press
Exxon Corp. says it is paying nearly $2.86 million to two top executives whose early retirements this year are enabling others to move up the ladder of the world's largest industrial company. Howard C. Kauffmann, who is stepping down as Exxon's president, is receiving a special payment of $1.63 million and Donald M. Cox, who is retiring as a senior vice president, is receiving $1.238 million, Exxon disclosed Monday in materials prepared for its annual shareholders' meeting. Both men are 62.
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