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Lawrence H Summers

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BUSINESS
May 13, 1999 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The smartest kid in the class is going to be Treasury secretary. That, in a nutshell, is what will happen when Lawrence H. Summers takes the job that will make him jointly responsible with Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan for protecting the nation's long economic expansion and keeping the rest of the world out of financial trouble. On the surface, the casting could hardly be stranger. To be sure, the 44-year-old Summers was born to economic aristocracy. Both his parents are economists.
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BUSINESS
August 9, 2013 | By Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - President Obama praised Lawrence H. Summers and Janet L. Yellen as "highly qualified" to be the next Federal Reserve chief, but said he had a "range of outstanding candidates" and reiterated that he would not make a decision until the fall. In a news conference Friday, Obama also suggested that his recent defense of Summers, a former Treasury secretary and his onetime chief economic advisor, should not be construed as Summers somehow having an inside track on the job. Yellen is the Fed's current vice chair.
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BUSINESS
January 5, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
President Obama is expected to name a replacement this week for top economic advisor Lawrence H. Summers, and the top candidates have had ties to the financial industry, which the president has lambasted for its role in precipitating the Great Recession. Summers' last day as director of the National Economic Council was Friday. His deputy, Jason Furman, has taken over the job as the White House finishes a search that began when Summers announced his resignation in September. Candidates to replace Summers include Gene Sperling, a former economic advisor to President Clinton who has done consulting work for investment banker Goldman Sachs Group Inc., and Roger Altman, chairman of investment banking firm Evercore Partners and a deputy Treasury secretary under Clinton.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama's choice for replacing Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke probably comes down to a quiet consensus builder, who would be a historic pick, or one considered brilliant but difficult to work with. Through unprecedented policy moves and public outreach, Bernanke has dramatically expanded the role and the profile of the nation's central bank. But neither he nor the White House have indicated whether he would seek a third term or be renominated. It is widely expected, though, that Bernanke will step down when his current term expires in January.
OPINION
April 1, 2007
Re "An occasion for redo economics," Opinion, March 26 It's been said that the Federal Reserve's job is to remove the punchbowl just as the party's getting started, thereby limiting the inevitable hangover that follows rapid economic expansion. But the Alan Greenspan and Ben S. Bernanke regimes not only refilled the punchbowl, they cranked up the music while investors of all stripes danced and asset prices zoomed. Amazingly, Lawrence H. Summers now asks the Fed to go easy, in effect offering a Bloody Mary as dawn approaches.
OPINION
February 2, 2007
Re "The life science imperative," Opinion, Jan. 29 Although I agree with Lawrence H. Summers' argument, if we're honest with ourselves, we also have to factor into our lead in science and technology in the 20th century that Europe's and Japan's capacities were largely bombed out of existence during World War II. The United States was not a leading place for science before the war. We also have to thank Hitler for unintentionally sending all those...
BUSINESS
October 20, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Lawrence H. Summers, the former U.S. Treasury secretary who resigned as Harvard University's president this year after clashes with faculty members, will join New York hedge fund firm D.E. Shaw & Co. as a part-time managing director. "Larry is an enormously gifted economist and has made major contributions as a researcher, a public servant and an academic leader," David Shaw, chairman of the $25-billion fund manager, said in a statement Thursday.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
Saying he hoped to "turn heat into light" after the recent controversy over his remarks on women in science, Harvard University President Lawrence H. Summers announced the appointment Thursday of two faculty task forces on women and pledged to create a senior administrative position to support gender diversity.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2005 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
The largest organization of faculty members at Harvard University passed a vote Tuesday expressing a lack of confidence in President Lawrence H. Summers, whose management style and controversial remarks about women in science have roiled the venerable institution. The 218-185 vote by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences is nonbinding. It was not clear Tuesday whether any of the university's nine other faculty groups would undertake similar action. Summers reports to the Harvard Corp.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2005 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Harvard University President Lawrence H. Summers apologized late Wednesday for his remarks last week suggesting that innate differences might make women less capable of succeeding at math and science than men, and acknowledged that his comments sent "an unintended signal of discouragement to talented girls and women." In a letter addressed to "members of the Harvard Community," Summers said: "I deeply regret the impact of my comments and apologize for not having weighed them more carefully."
BUSINESS
January 5, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
President Obama is expected to name a replacement this week for top economic advisor Lawrence H. Summers, and the top candidates have had ties to the financial industry, which the president has lambasted for its role in precipitating the Great Recession. Summers' last day as director of the National Economic Council was Friday. His deputy, Jason Furman, has taken over the job as the White House finishes a search that began when Summers announced his resignation in September. Candidates to replace Summers include Gene Sperling, a former economic advisor to President Clinton who has done consulting work for investment banker Goldman Sachs Group Inc., and Roger Altman, chairman of investment banking firm Evercore Partners and a deputy Treasury secretary under Clinton.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2009 | Don Lee
President Obama's chief economic advisor, former Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers, defended the administration's massive program for fighting the recession, saying it was on track and beginning to show results despite continuing bad news on unemployment.
OPINION
April 1, 2007
Re "An occasion for redo economics," Opinion, March 26 It's been said that the Federal Reserve's job is to remove the punchbowl just as the party's getting started, thereby limiting the inevitable hangover that follows rapid economic expansion. But the Alan Greenspan and Ben S. Bernanke regimes not only refilled the punchbowl, they cranked up the music while investors of all stripes danced and asset prices zoomed. Amazingly, Lawrence H. Summers now asks the Fed to go easy, in effect offering a Bloody Mary as dawn approaches.
OPINION
February 2, 2007
Re "The life science imperative," Opinion, Jan. 29 Although I agree with Lawrence H. Summers' argument, if we're honest with ourselves, we also have to factor into our lead in science and technology in the 20th century that Europe's and Japan's capacities were largely bombed out of existence during World War II. The United States was not a leading place for science before the war. We also have to thank Hitler for unintentionally sending all those...
BUSINESS
October 20, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Lawrence H. Summers, the former U.S. Treasury secretary who resigned as Harvard University's president this year after clashes with faculty members, will join New York hedge fund firm D.E. Shaw & Co. as a part-time managing director. "Larry is an enormously gifted economist and has made major contributions as a researcher, a public servant and an academic leader," David Shaw, chairman of the $25-billion fund manager, said in a statement Thursday.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2006 | Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writer
If Harvard University President Lawrence H. Summers was worried about how the undergraduates would greet him Wednesday night at his first scheduled event since announcing his resignation, those fears quickly were put to rest. He got a standing ovation after he walked in. He got a standing ovation before he left. A row of students with red letters painted on their chests spelled out "Larry." Sarah Bahan, 22, was wistful as she left the meeting.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Suharto earlier this week stepped out to greet the high-level envoy President Clinton had sent here to talk about Indonesia's mounting financial crisis, the rumpled, plainly dressed man he beheld looked more like a college professor than an experienced diplomat. But the appearance was deceiving. Although Lawrence H.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time in Washington when the great power game was the exclusive domain of the secretary of State and the national security advisor, while the Treasury secretary was relegated to lesser pursuits. No more. In a post-Cold War world where the market is king and America's prosperity depends as much on events in Osaka as in Omaha, the job of being America's finance minister has been elevated to a status that only a Henry Kissinger or a George Kennan could truly appreciate.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2006 | Ellen Barry and Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writers
Besieged Harvard President Lawrence H. Summers announced Tuesday that he would resign at the end of the academic year, avoiding open warfare with a growing bloc of alienated faculty members and ending a five-year tenure mired in controversy.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2005 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
The largest organization of faculty members at Harvard University passed a vote Tuesday expressing a lack of confidence in President Lawrence H. Summers, whose management style and controversial remarks about women in science have roiled the venerable institution. The 218-185 vote by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences is nonbinding. It was not clear Tuesday whether any of the university's nine other faculty groups would undertake similar action. Summers reports to the Harvard Corp.
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