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Lawrence J Korb

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NEWS
June 19, 1988 | Associated Press
A former Pentagon official on Saturday accused former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and Frank C. Carlucci, the department's current chief, of slackening the military's spending controls. Lawrence J. Korb, Weinberger's manpower chief for four years until leaving the Pentagon in 1985, said in a television interview that when Carlucci was Weinberger's deputy, the two men "basically loosened the controls."
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NEWS
July 4, 1988 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writers
The massive procurement scandal now enveloping the Defense Department had its roots not only in the greed of individuals but in some of the Reagan Administration's most basic policy goals: cutting back the bureaucracy, encouraging free-market competition and restoring the strength and prestige of America's armed forces.
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NEWS
July 4, 1988 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writers
The massive procurement scandal now enveloping the Defense Department had its roots not only in the greed of individuals but in some of the Reagan Administration's most basic policy goals: cutting back the bureaucracy, encouraging free-market competition and restoring the strength and prestige of America's armed forces.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | Associated Press
A former Pentagon official on Saturday accused former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and Frank C. Carlucci, the department's current chief, of slackening the military's spending controls. Lawrence J. Korb, Weinberger's manpower chief for four years until leaving the Pentagon in 1985, said in a television interview that when Carlucci was Weinberger's deputy, the two men "basically loosened the controls."
NEWS
August 15, 1985
The Pentagon's overseer of the all-volunteer armed forces is resigning to take an executive position with the Raytheon Corp., the Defense Department said. Lawrence J. Korb, 46, a professor and former Navy flight officer who joined the Reagan Administration in 1981, will be leaving Sept. 1, at which time he will become the vice president for corporate operations at Raytheon. The company, based in Lexington, Mass., is the nation's ninth-largest defense contractor.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
The undetected flight of a Soviet-built MIG from Cuba to Key West, Fla., exposed gaps in the nation's southern air defense that military officials say may be all but impossible to plug. The March 20 incident has prompted an internal investigation by NORAD, the U.S.-Canadian command charged with protecting North American airspace, spokesman Maj. John Niemann said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1986
Since the birth of big government, officials have been tempted to look on tax revenues as their money. But few cases have been more blatant and reprehensible than recent efforts by some Pentagon civilians to use the power of the purse to silence dissent within the defense community. Times Washington correspondent James Gerstenzang reported several incidents on Sunday in which defense officials sought to silence criticism with implied threats to cut off defense contracts. Lawrence J.
NEWS
November 27, 1986 | Associated Press
The Pentagon's inspector general has concluded that top Navy officials "acted improperly" in lodging complaints with a defense contractor about one of its executives who had publicly criticized the department's budget request as too high. The executive was later fired. The report released Wednesday brought calls from the former executive, Dr. Lawrence J. Korb, from Rep. Denny Smith (R-Ore.) and from the American Civil Liberties Union for the removal of Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1996
American military spending, reports the International Institute of Strategic Studies, is more than three times greater than any other country's and in fact exceeds the outlays of all of this nation's potential enemies combined. No country has troops that are better trained, and none can match the quality of U.S. military equipment.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the Pentagon, this is not the best of times. But it is not the worst of times, either. On the one hand, the Bush Administration has proposed slashing defense budgets every year for the next five years, for a total cumulative decrease of nearly 10%. On the other hand, even after five years of cuts, the Pentagon would still have about 25% more to spend, inflationary factors aside, than it did on average between 1973 and 1980--prior to the Ronald Reagan Administration's massive buildup.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Navy begins to close its books on the Tailhook scandal--with seemingly little to show for it in terms of formal prosecutions and punishments--critics are asking whether the worst such episode in modern naval history was all for naught.
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