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Lawrence Lindsey

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BUSINESS
December 15, 1995 | From Associated Press
Lawrence B. Lindsey, as a Federal Reserve Board member, helps make decisions with enormous sway over Americans' credit--whether they can afford loans for new houses, say, or to expand businesses. But when he shops at Toys R Us, Lindsey must pay in cash. His application for a Toys R Us credit card was rejected last month, thanks to a computer program that assumed he was a shaky credit risk.
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NATIONAL
December 7, 2002 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
Treasury Secretary Paul H. O'Neill and Lawrence B. Lindsey, President Bush's two top economic advisors, were forced from their jobs Friday, the administration's first major shake-up and a clear signal of a more aggressive White House approach toward a struggling economy. The dismissals were disclosed just as the stock market was reeling from the government's announcement that the nation's unemployment rate took an unexpected jump to 6% in November, up from 5.7% in October. With word that O'Neill and Lindsey, head of the White House's National Economic Council, had been asked to resign, the market staged a comeback.
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BUSINESS
January 2, 2000 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican front-runner George W. Bush has faced accusations lately of being an intellectual lightweight. His chief economic advisor most definitely has not. Lawrence B. Lindsey has all the academic and policy heft (former Harvard associate professor, former senior White House economist, former governor of the Federal Reserve) that any candidate could want. And compared with the candidate's spare frame, he has a substantial amount of physical heft as well.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal Reserve Board Gov. Lawrence Lindsey announced his resignation from the seven-member board that shapes the country's monetary policy and regulates part of its banking system. In his resignation letter to President Clinton, Lindsey said his resignation will take effect Feb. 5. Lindsey, 42, will join the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative Washington think tank, where he will become a resident scholar and holder of the Arthur F. Burns Chair in Economics.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1991 | a Times Staff Writer
In a move likely to increase Bush Administration influence at the Federal Reserve Board, White House economist Lawrence Lindsey was nominated Monday to fill a vacancy on the Fed's board of governors. President Bush named Lindsey, a strong supporter of supply-side economics and of tax cuts, to fill a vacancy created last summer by the resignation of former Fed Vice Chairman Manuel Johnson.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1994 | From Reuters
Federal Reserve Board Gov. Lawrence Lindsey said Monday that he hopes the recent rise in short-term interest rates will keep inflation at bay, but he warned that another upward push may be needed if price pressures build in the moderately expanding economy. "Hopefully, one quarter-point is going to solve the problem," Lindsey said at a meeting of the Credit Union National Assn.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1992 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Banks could face strict, utility-type regulation if they fail to react to criticism that they do an inadequate job of meeting the loan needs of low-income and minority customers, a member of the Federal Reserve Board warned Monday in Long Beach. In a speech to the annual convention of the California Bankers Assn., Fed Gov. Lawrence B.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2000 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican front-runner George W. Bush has faced accusations lately of being an intellectual lightweight. His chief economic advisor most definitely has not. Lawrence B. Lindsey has all the academic and policy heft (former Harvard associate professor, former senior White House economist, former governor of the Federal Reserve) that any candidate could want. And compared with the candidate's spare frame, he has a substantial amount of physical heft as well.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2002 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
Treasury Secretary Paul H. O'Neill and Lawrence B. Lindsey, President Bush's two top economic advisors, were forced from their jobs Friday, the administration's first major shake-up and a clear signal of a more aggressive White House approach toward a struggling economy. The dismissals were disclosed just as the stock market was reeling from the government's announcement that the nation's unemployment rate took an unexpected jump to 6% in November, up from 5.7% in October. With word that O'Neill and Lindsey, head of the White House's National Economic Council, had been asked to resign, the market staged a comeback.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal Reserve Board Gov. Lawrence Lindsey announced his resignation from the seven-member board that shapes the country's monetary policy and regulates part of its banking system. In his resignation letter to President Clinton, Lindsey said his resignation will take effect Feb. 5. Lindsey, 42, will join the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative Washington think tank, where he will become a resident scholar and holder of the Arthur F. Burns Chair in Economics.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1995 | From Associated Press
Lawrence B. Lindsey, as a Federal Reserve Board member, helps make decisions with enormous sway over Americans' credit--whether they can afford loans for new houses, say, or to expand businesses. But when he shops at Toys R Us, Lindsey must pay in cash. His application for a Toys R Us credit card was rejected last month, thanks to a computer program that assumed he was a shaky credit risk.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1994 | From Reuters
Federal Reserve Board Gov. Lawrence Lindsey said Monday that he hopes the recent rise in short-term interest rates will keep inflation at bay, but he warned that another upward push may be needed if price pressures build in the moderately expanding economy. "Hopefully, one quarter-point is going to solve the problem," Lindsey said at a meeting of the Credit Union National Assn.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1992 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Banks could face strict, utility-type regulation if they fail to react to criticism that they do an inadequate job of meeting the loan needs of low-income and minority customers, a member of the Federal Reserve Board warned Monday in Long Beach. In a speech to the annual convention of the California Bankers Assn., Fed Gov. Lawrence B.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1991 | a Times Staff Writer
In a move likely to increase Bush Administration influence at the Federal Reserve Board, White House economist Lawrence Lindsey was nominated Monday to fill a vacancy on the Fed's board of governors. President Bush named Lindsey, a strong supporter of supply-side economics and of tax cuts, to fill a vacancy created last summer by the resignation of former Fed Vice Chairman Manuel Johnson.
NEWS
January 20, 2002 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES SENIOR ECONOMICS WRITER
The collapse of Enron Corp., so far a political, legal and investor crisis, is now imposing widespread costs on the U.S. economy, according to a range of companies, energy experts and bankers. Electricity and natural gas companies are facing higher costs. Projects to build power plants, pipelines and transmission lines are being put on hold. And in all sections of the economy, companies with high debts are feeling the pinch of tighter credit.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
President Bush today nominated White House economist Lawrence Lindsey to fill a longstanding vacancy on the Federal Reserve Board. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater also said the President would elevate Fed Governor David Mullins to the post of vice chairman. Lindsey, a strong advocate of supply-side economics and an advocate of tax cuts, would fill the unexpired 14-year term of former Fed Vice Chairman Manuel Johnson, who resigned last June. The term runs through the year 2000.
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