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Lawrence Thornton

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September 20, 1987 | Richard Eder
A regime of terror is marked not simply by its concrete killings but by some particular identifying abstraction. In the case of Argentina in the 1970s, this abstraction was syntactical. It concealed inside the most intransitive of verbs--"to disappear"--a fearfully transitive concept. Hence, the thousands of desaparecidos , an existing word given a new meaning in Spanish, and one that in English required inventing: "the disappeared." Ostensibly, it meant "those who have disappeared."
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July 19, 1992 | Gary Soto, Soto's most recent books are "Taking Sides" and "Neighborhood Odes," both published by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. He is completing a film for ITVS. and
Not yet summer, and we may have had our fill of books designed by publishers to capitalize on the quincentenary of a man stepping in sand and naming an island, thus a continent, in the name of a Catholic king. We have only to return to 1976 and our bicentennial to remember the hullabaloo that amounted to longer sparklers and bigger flags that neither sparked better nor waved more grandly in the wind.
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November 1, 1990 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Imagination is a blind leap over a frontier ditch. You can find yourself in an astonishingly different country, or at the bottom of the ditch. Lawrence Thornton's novel, "Imagining Argentina," was a leap of the fortunate kind. A California professor and writer, he did precisely what his title suggested.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Imagination is a blind leap over a frontier ditch. You can find yourself in an astonishingly different country, or at the bottom of the ditch. Lawrence Thornton's novel, "Imagining Argentina," was a leap of the fortunate kind. A California professor and writer, he did precisely what his title suggested.
NEWS
June 28, 1988 | MONA GABLE, Gable is a Los Angeles writer. and
Lawrence Thornton, Michael Chabon and Elizabeth George have everything in common and nothing at all. Each is a Southern Californian and, within the last year, each has achieved every writer's dream--publication of a critically acclaimed first novel. Aside from that, you probably wouldn't find them at the same dinner party: One writes elegantly plotted British detective mysteries, another about Latin American politics.
BOOKS
July 19, 1992 | Gary Soto, Soto's most recent books are "Taking Sides" and "Neighborhood Odes," both published by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. He is completing a film for ITVS. and
Not yet summer, and we may have had our fill of books designed by publishers to capitalize on the quincentenary of a man stepping in sand and naming an island, thus a continent, in the name of a Catholic king. We have only to return to 1976 and our bicentennial to remember the hullabaloo that amounted to longer sparklers and bigger flags that neither sparked better nor waved more grandly in the wind.
NEWS
March 11, 1988
Five novelists, three of them from Southern California, have been nominated for the 1988 PEN/Faulkner award in fiction. The nominees are Richard Bausch of Fairfax, Va., for "Spirits" (Simon & Schuster); T. Coraghessan Boyle of Woodland Hills for "World's End" (Viking); Alice McDermott of La Jolla for "That Night" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux); Lawrence Thornton of Claremont for "Imagining Argentina" (Doubleday), and Cynthia Ozick for "The Messiah of Stockholm" (Knopf).
NEWS
April 21, 1988
Los Angeles novelist T. Coraghessan Boyle was named the winner of the eighth annual PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction for his novel, "World's End" on Wednesday. Boyle's book was selected from more than 200 novels and short story collections by American writers published in 1987. A professor of creative writing at USC, Boyle is the author of four previous books, "Descent of Man," "Water Music," "Budding Prospects" and "Greasy Lake" and his stories have appeared in most major American magazines.
NEWS
September 30, 1988
Ten writers will be honored at PEN Center USA West's annual awards banquet tonight in the Crystal Room at the Beverly Hills Hotel. Novelist Herbert Gold, author of works including "Dreaming," "Fathers and Salt" and "A Girl of Forty" will receive the organization's award for a distinguished body of work. The president's award will go to George Kirgo, president of the Writers Guild.
NEWS
June 28, 1988 | MONA GABLE, Gable is a Los Angeles writer. and
Lawrence Thornton, Michael Chabon and Elizabeth George have everything in common and nothing at all. Each is a Southern Californian and, within the last year, each has achieved every writer's dream--publication of a critically acclaimed first novel. Aside from that, you probably wouldn't find them at the same dinner party: One writes elegantly plotted British detective mysteries, another about Latin American politics.
BOOKS
September 20, 1987 | Richard Eder
A regime of terror is marked not simply by its concrete killings but by some particular identifying abstraction. In the case of Argentina in the 1970s, this abstraction was syntactical. It concealed inside the most intransitive of verbs--"to disappear"--a fearfully transitive concept. Hence, the thousands of desaparecidos , an existing word given a new meaning in Spanish, and one that in English required inventing: "the disappeared." Ostensibly, it meant "those who have disappeared."
NEWS
February 22, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Some of America's best-known writers will gather today in Los Angeles and New York to demonstrate their solidarity with British author Salman Rushdie, who has been targeted for assassination by Iran's supreme leader, the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. Members of PEN Center USA West and the National Book Critics Circle will read from Rushdie's works, including "The Satanic Verses," during a private reception in Los Angeles. Authors Ray Bradbury, T.
BOOKS
December 25, 1988
Re: Your double review of "The Dream of Heroes" and "Diary of the War of the Pig" (Book Review, Dec. 11). The headline, "Novels Borges Never Wrote," just may be more fitting and revealing than you, the editors and reviewer Lawrence Thornton have imagined. The brief synopsis of Adolfo Bioy Casares' "The Dream of Heroes" immediately evokes Lawrence Durrell's "Alexandria Quartet." I find the subject matter very Durrell. The masked girl at a carnival ball became an obsession to Amaral, the plastic surgeon, who, when he finally found her, was able to transform her disfigured nose (i.e.
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