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BUSINESS
April 27, 1999 | Greg Miller
Leading consumer groups are set to announce today a joint resolution condemning the "safe harbor" agreement U.S. officials are seeking to protect American companies from a strict new European privacy law. The resolution could be an embarrassing development for the officials, who are scheduled to resume talks with European negotiators today in Washington over what has become a nettlesome privacy dispute. U.S. officials were unavailable for comment.
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NEWS
August 26, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oleg Bartkiv gave up his job as a doctor's assistant in Ukraine to come here for a job paving roads. It hasn't been easy, but he feels that he's on the way to a better life. "I want to see the whole world, not just Ukraine," the 24-year-old said. "I want to see the United States and Canada most of all. It's my dream."
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NEWS
February 20, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Romania's provisional prime minister, Petre Roman, said Monday that some of the demonstrators who forced their way into government offices in Bucharest on Sunday and briefly held captive the country's vice premier were "suspicious persons, ex-convicts, people without jobs, loaded with money and armed with knives."
BUSINESS
April 27, 1999 | Greg Miller
Leading consumer groups are set to announce today a joint resolution condemning the "safe harbor" agreement U.S. officials are seeking to protect American companies from a strict new European privacy law. The resolution could be an embarrassing development for the officials, who are scheduled to resume talks with European negotiators today in Washington over what has become a nettlesome privacy dispute. U.S. officials were unavailable for comment.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oleg Bartkiv gave up his job as a doctor's assistant in Ukraine to come here for a job paving roads. It hasn't been easy, but he feels that he's on the way to a better life. "I want to see the whole world, not just Ukraine," the 24-year-old said. "I want to see the United States and Canada most of all. It's my dream."
BUSINESS
September 9, 2003 | From Reuters
IBM Corp. is least likely to snoop on its employees, whereas drug maker Eli Lilly & Co. is the most aggressive "Big Brother" boss, a magazine reports. The technology magazine Wired surveyed watchdog organizations such as the American Civil Liberties Union and the Privacy Foundation to determine which large publicly traded companies were the best and worst for workplace privacy. IBM took top honors for its efforts to scrub Social Security numbers from health-care records.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2002 | Associated Press
Microsoft Corp. does not have to disclose its lobbying contacts with Congress connected with its antitrust case, a federal judge decided Tuesday. The 1974 Tunney Act, which makes sure that a company settling federal charges doesn't get improper favors from government employees, calls for a company to disclose its lobbying contacts with "any officer or employee of the United States."
OPINION
October 20, 2008
Re "Forget 'memory laws,' " Opinion, Oct. 16 How magnanimous of Timothy Garton Ash to dispense with appropriate legal avenues to protect other people's calamities from the desecration of revision and denial. Despite his disclaimer solemnly professing to support recognition of wrongdoing by its perpetrators, he is making a coverup argument for denialists. How many years of "academic freedom" does it take to establish a historical fact? By Garton Ash's logic, the 93-plus years since the commencement of Turkey's annihilation of its Armenian population are insufficient.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2004 | From Reuters
Google Inc.'s Gmail came under fresh fire Monday when an international privacy rights group said the soon-to-be-launched free e-mail service violated privacy laws in Europe and elsewhere. Privacy International, which has offices in the U.S. and Europe, said it had filed complaints with privacy and data-protection regulators in 17 countries in Europe, as well as in Canada and Australia. It had already filed an initial complaint in Britain.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2001 | RICHARD VERRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the final phase of its plan to cut 4,000 jobs companywide, Walt Disney Co. is expected to deliver pink slips to about 1,000 workers from Burbank to Orlando, Fla., starting today and continuing over the next few weeks. The layoffs come two months after Disney announced its single biggest job cut ever, blaming a soft economy that has hurt theme park attendance and advertising spending at its ABC television network.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Romania's provisional prime minister, Petre Roman, said Monday that some of the demonstrators who forced their way into government offices in Bucharest on Sunday and briefly held captive the country's vice premier were "suspicious persons, ex-convicts, people without jobs, loaded with money and armed with knives."
BUSINESS
December 20, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The successful conclusion last week of world trade talks amounts to a bittersweet victory for East Asian countries that have built their prosperity on international trade. Policy makers and analysts in Japan, South Korea and Taiwan generally agreed that collapse of the negotiations to extend the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade would have severely damaged their economies.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2011 | By Cyndia Zwahlen
A bill making its way through Congress calls for a significant change in the way patents are awarded. It would switch the U.S. from a system that favors the first person to invent an item or process to one that would instead give preference to the first person to file for the patent. It's a change that has independent inventors worried that it would make the process more complicated and expensive, and thus give an advantage to large firms. "It does add to the anxiety, it does make it feel like more of a race" to the patent office, said Minna Ha of Arcadia, who has a patent application pending for a cosmetic case designed to hold makeup refills.
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