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NEWS
May 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
Japan is lifting a ban on hunting bottlenose whales in the Sea of Japan and will allow ships to kill up to eight of the animals there this year, an official said Monday. Japanese whalers have not hunted the animals in the area, off the western coast of the main northern island, Hokkaido, since 1972. Japan had limited hunting of bottlenose whales to the Pacific Ocean, off the country's eastern coast.
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NEWS
May 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
Japan is lifting a ban on hunting bottlenose whales in the Sea of Japan and will allow ships to kill up to eight of the animals there this year, an official said Monday. Japanese whalers have not hunted the animals in the area, off the western coast of the main northern island, Hokkaido, since 1972. Japan had limited hunting of bottlenose whales to the Pacific Ocean, off the country's eastern coast.
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NEWS
May 11, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When environmentalists in southern Japan started worrying that the chemical runoff from a proposed golf course would pollute an unspoiled island, they asked local officials for a copy of the environmental impact report--and were told that it was none of their business. "In democratic countries like America, this may seem hard to believe, but the reason they gave was that ordinary people would not be able to understand the technical language," said attorney Ryuji Nishida.
NEWS
May 11, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When environmentalists in southern Japan started worrying that the chemical runoff from a proposed golf course would pollute an unspoiled island, they asked local officials for a copy of the environmental impact report--and were told that it was none of their business. "In democratic countries like America, this may seem hard to believe, but the reason they gave was that ordinary people would not be able to understand the technical language," said attorney Ryuji Nishida.
NEWS
November 14, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
America's drive to persuade its allies to sharply curb shipments of high-tech equipment to Iran has hit a major roadblock in Tokyo, which is expressing some reluctance to back Washington's latest Middle Eastern initiative. Where America sees in Iran an emerging regional and global threat in an unstable part of the world, Japan sees an old friendship still worthy of cultivating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1992
Germany and Japan are letting it be known that they want permanent seats on the U.N. Security Council. Japanese officials speak of 1995, the United Nations' 50th anniversary, as an appropriate date for achieving that goal. Both countries, given their regional importance and industrial strength (they are, respectively, the world's second- and third-biggest economies), are clearly entitled to the international standing that permanent membership on the council implies.
SPORTS
October 10, 1994 | MAL FLORENCE
Mike Lynn, former general manager of the Minnesota Vikings, said in an interview with Dan Barreiro of the Star Tribune of Minneapolis that there is a tendency in the NFL to hire low-profile coaches. "That's why I think it was excellent for Arizona to hire Buddy Ryan," Lynn said. "You can love him or hate him, but you can't say he doesn't create excitement. That's why I really think (Mike) Ditka should be back in this league. He was a personality and he was volatile.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1996 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the World Trade Organization holds its first full-scale ministerial meeting in Singapore beginning Monday, the big winner stands to be the $1-trillion information technology industry--especially its leading lights in the United States. In a proposal with potentially rich benefits for such technology giants as IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, Microsoft and Apple, the industry hopes to benefit from one of the most sweeping tariff cutbacks ever imposed on a single sector of business.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dogs are to barking what Japanese companies are to . . . dumping? Well, that may be a bit of a stretch. But it has sometimes seemed that way. Steel, machine tools, semiconductors, cars--just about every product from Japan you can think of has been the subject of dumping charges by U.S. industry at one time or another. Japanese companies complain that American industry uses the dumping charges unfairly to beat up on importers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1985 | ERNEST CONINE, Ernest Conine is a Times editorial writer. and
By now it's accepted gospel that American business has not been sufficiently export-minded, and that Washington has not been forceful enough in telling other countries that free trade must be fair trade. What still hasn't received much attention, however, is the fact that some of the most burdensome restraints facing would-be U.S. exporters are those imposed by their own government.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1986 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration on Thursday dismissed a complaint by domestic rice growers seeking action to open Japanese markets to California rice. The issue has generated a major controversy in Japan, where rice farmers are a powerful political force and where rice imports are all but banned. Disappointed American growers said the Administration's action could result in a heated political dispute here as well.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2005 | Terril Yue Jones and Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writers
Japan's anti-monopoly watchdog on Tuesday accused chip maker Intel Corp. of abusing its market dominance by pressuring computer makers not to buy rival microprocessors. The Japanese Fair Trade Commission warned Santa Clara, Calif.-based Intel that it could face prosecution if it didn't change its business practices in Japan. The company has 10 days to respond formally to the charges. Intel executives denied wrongdoing.
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