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BUSINESS
August 30, 2011 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
When author Robert Greene wrote his bestselling book "The 48 Laws of Power," his win-at-all-costs message turned him into a cult hero with the hip-hop set, Hollywood elite and prison inmates alike. Crush your enemy totally, he wrote in Law 15. Play a sucker to catch a sucker, he said in another. Get others to do the work for you, but always take the credit. Greene's warrior-like take on the quest for power, written more than a decade ago, would eventually attract another devotee: Dov Charney, the provocative and sometimes impish chief executive of Los Angeles clothing company American Apparel Inc. The 52-year-old Greene — a former screenwriter who speaks five languages and worked 80 jobs before writing "The 48 Laws" — has become Charney's guru, a trusted confidant to the 42-year-old entrepreneur and, insiders say, a voice of reason on American Apparel's board of directors.
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NATIONAL
November 3, 2013 | By Joseph Tanfani
WASHINGTON - As drug dealers go, Lori Ann Newhouse was strictly small time. A high school dropout from a little Iowa town, Newhouse had three sons, a low-paying job as a telemarketer and a relentless methamphetamine habit. On St. Patrick's Day in 2011, Newhouse bought cold tablets used to make meth and traded them to a lab for a gram of the highly addictive drug. Federal agents, it turned out, were watching. Newhouse's bust landed her in the federal system in northern Iowa, where drug sentences have been among the harshest in the nation.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Oklahoma's high court on Tuesday set the stage for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether states can restrict doctors from prescribing two drugs used to induce abortion in the early stages of pregnancy. The case could be the first test of whether the court's conservative majority will uphold a string of new state laws across the country that seek to strictly regulate legal abortions. In the last three years, Republican-led states have passed laws to limit abortion without banning it outright.
WORLD
July 22, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A Norwegian interior designer who said she was raped by a Sudanese colleague during a business trip to the United Arab Emirates city of Dubai earlier this year has been “pardoned” from her conviction and 16-month sentence for extramarital sex, drinking alcohol and providing false information to authorities. The decision Monday in the name of the Emirati ruler in Dubai cleared the way for 24-year-old Marte Deborah Dalelv to return to her Nordic homeland. But it in no way reflected a change in the Islamic federation's laws or practices that typically treat women against whom sexual violence is committed as criminals rather than victims.
OPINION
February 1, 2004
If anything, "Gov.'s Loan for Recall Ruled Illegal" (Jan. 27) shows the futility of trying to interpret and comply with the myriad laws, rules and regulations now on the books. The Legislature passes about 1,000 new laws each year. The inevitable result of laws piled on top of laws is that process (how something is done) becomes more important than product (what is done). Forget the goal or objective. We live in a time when legal requirements and paperwork are measured in pounds. All the i's must be dotted and t's crossed to the satisfaction of some judge, lawyer or bureaucrat.
OPINION
January 7, 2001
Re your Jan. 1 article on some of the state's most important 2001 laws: By my count of the 81 new laws, two were bipartisan, 70 were sponsored by Democrats and nine by Republicans. No wonder Republicans can cry "too much government"--they just don't bother to do a thing. MARNE CARMEAN West Hollywood
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Thirty of the 50 largest U.S. cities prohibit smoking indoors at all workplaces, restaurants and bars, the federal government reported. Just 12 years ago, only San Jose had such a law. As of Oct. 12, 16 of the largest cities had comprehensive smoke-free laws, and 14 additional cities were covered under state laws, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported this week. Overall, nearly half of Americans are covered by state or local smoke-free laws, compared with less than 3% in 2000, the CDC said in its report published in the agency's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Discrimination happens every day, but obese people have little recourse when it happens to them, since there is no federal law protecting this population. But a survey reveals that public opinion may be in favor of anti-discrimination laws--to a point. Researchers from the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University surveyed 1,001 adults about their opinions on legal and legislative matters relating to obesity discrimination. They were asked how strongly they agreed or disagreed with statements such as "Obesity should be considered a disability under the Americans with Disability Act so that obese people will be protected from discrimination in the workplace," "The government should play a more active role in protecting overweight people from discrimination," "Overweight people should be subject to the same protections and benefits offered to people with physical disabilities," and "The government should play a more active role in protecting overweight people from discrimination.
SPORTS
August 7, 2013 | By David Wharton
President Obama has added his voice to a growing chorus of international leaders and sportsmen concerned that Russia's new anti-gay laws could be enforced at the 2014 Sochi Olympics. The laws ban "propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations," making it a crime to openly discuss gay rights and relationships where minors can overhear. "I think [Vladimir] Putin and Russia have a big stake in making sure the Olympics work," Obama told Jay Leno during an appearance on "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" on Tuesday night. "And I think they understand that for most of the countries that participate in the Olympics, we wouldn't tolerate gays and lesbians being treated differently.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | By Meg James
NBC Sports Group Chairman Mark Lazarus said NBC would provide coverage of Russia's anti-gay laws if the controversial measures surface as an issue during the upcoming Winter Olympics. Political tensions and cultural differences have long provided a vivid backdrop for the Games, and NBC expects that tradition to continue next year in Sochi, Russia. The Winter Olympics are set to begin Feb. 6. All host nations, including Russia, "come with political and social issues, and we will address those issues as they are revelant at the time of the Games," Lazarus told a crowd of nearly 200 television writers Saturday at the Television Critics Assn.
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