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WORLD
July 22, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A Norwegian interior designer who said she was raped by a Sudanese colleague during a business trip to the United Arab Emirates city of Dubai earlier this year has been “pardoned” from her conviction and 16-month sentence for extramarital sex, drinking alcohol and providing false information to authorities. The decision Monday in the name of the Emirati ruler in Dubai cleared the way for 24-year-old Marte Deborah Dalelv to return to her Nordic homeland. But it in no way reflected a change in the Islamic federation's laws or practices that typically treat women against whom sexual violence is committed as criminals rather than victims.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2014 | Catherine Saillant, Abby Sewell
Bobby Shriver, the first Los Angeles County supervisorial contender in 18 years to opt out of voluntary campaign spending limits, is calling for a major overhaul of county election laws, including lifting fundraising restrictions on candidates who use personal wealth to help pay for their campaigns. Last month, the Santa Monica lawyer and nonprofit director contributed $300,000 of his own money to his effort to succeed longtime west county Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky. Shriver, a member of the Kennedy political family, criticized a $1.4-million voluntary spending limit in the June 3 primary as inadequate to get his message out to 2 million constituents.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Oklahoma's high court on Tuesday set the stage for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether states can restrict doctors from prescribing two drugs used to induce abortion in the early stages of pregnancy. The case could be the first test of whether the court's conservative majority will uphold a string of new state laws across the country that seek to strictly regulate legal abortions. In the last three years, Republican-led states have passed laws to limit abortion without banning it outright.
OPINION
May 16, 2011 | Jed Rubenfeld, Jed Rubenfeld is a professor of law at Yale Law School and a former U.S. representative to the Council of Europe
First came the street celebrations; then the changing accounts of what happened; then the second-guessing -- domestic and foreign. An "extrajudicial execution," that's what many in the international community are now calling the killing of Osama bin Laden. The U.N.'s Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights has called for an investigation. According to a U.N. special rapporteur, if the U.S. commandos were under shoot-to-kill orders and did so without offering Bin Laden a "meaningful prospect of surrender," his killing could have been a "cold-blooded execution.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Thirty of the 50 largest U.S. cities prohibit smoking indoors at all workplaces, restaurants and bars, the federal government reported. Just 12 years ago, only San Jose had such a law. As of Oct. 12, 16 of the largest cities had comprehensive smoke-free laws, and 14 additional cities were covered under state laws, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported this week. Overall, nearly half of Americans are covered by state or local smoke-free laws, compared with less than 3% in 2000, the CDC said in its report published in the agency's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch
Americans are buckling up their seat belts at an all-time high rate, the Department of Transportation said Thursday. An annual survey by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that nationwide seat belt use has climbed to 86% this year from 84% last year and 58% back in 1994, when the agency first started studying seat belt use patterns. The adoption of seat belt laws in most states has increased seat belt use, the agency said. “Thanks to the ongoing work of our state and local partners and national efforts such as 'Click It or Ticket,' we've made steady gains in belt use in recent years,” said NHTSA Administrator David Strickland. “Moving forward, it will be critical to build on this success using a multi-faceted approach that combines good laws, effective enforcement, and public education and awareness.” Seat belt use increased the most in the South during the past year, up to 85% from 80%. The Western U.S. has the most seat belt use at 94% of occupants, up from 93% last year.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Discrimination happens every day, but obese people have little recourse when it happens to them, since there is no federal law protecting this population. But a survey reveals that public opinion may be in favor of anti-discrimination laws--to a point. Researchers from the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University surveyed 1,001 adults about their opinions on legal and legislative matters relating to obesity discrimination. They were asked how strongly they agreed or disagreed with statements such as "Obesity should be considered a disability under the Americans with Disability Act so that obese people will be protected from discrimination in the workplace," "The government should play a more active role in protecting overweight people from discrimination," "Overweight people should be subject to the same protections and benefits offered to people with physical disabilities," and "The government should play a more active role in protecting overweight people from discrimination.
SPORTS
August 7, 2013 | By David Wharton
President Obama has added his voice to a growing chorus of international leaders and sportsmen concerned that Russia's new anti-gay laws could be enforced at the 2014 Sochi Olympics. The laws ban "propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations," making it a crime to openly discuss gay rights and relationships where minors can overhear. "I think [Vladimir] Putin and Russia have a big stake in making sure the Olympics work," Obama told Jay Leno during an appearance on "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" on Tuesday night. "And I think they understand that for most of the countries that participate in the Olympics, we wouldn't tolerate gays and lesbians being treated differently.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | By Meg James
NBC Sports Group Chairman Mark Lazarus said NBC would provide coverage of Russia's anti-gay laws if the controversial measures surface as an issue during the upcoming Winter Olympics. Political tensions and cultural differences have long provided a vivid backdrop for the Games, and NBC expects that tradition to continue next year in Sochi, Russia. The Winter Olympics are set to begin Feb. 6. All host nations, including Russia, "come with political and social issues, and we will address those issues as they are revelant at the time of the Games," Lazarus told a crowd of nearly 200 television writers Saturday at the Television Critics Assn.
OPINION
February 1, 2004
If anything, "Gov.'s Loan for Recall Ruled Illegal" (Jan. 27) shows the futility of trying to interpret and comply with the myriad laws, rules and regulations now on the books. The Legislature passes about 1,000 new laws each year. The inevitable result of laws piled on top of laws is that process (how something is done) becomes more important than product (what is done). Forget the goal or objective. We live in a time when legal requirements and paperwork are measured in pounds. All the i's must be dotted and t's crossed to the satisfaction of some judge, lawyer or bureaucrat.
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