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OPINION
May 16, 2011 | Jed Rubenfeld, Jed Rubenfeld is a professor of law at Yale Law School and a former U.S. representative to the Council of Europe
First came the street celebrations; then the changing accounts of what happened; then the second-guessing -- domestic and foreign. An "extrajudicial execution," that's what many in the international community are now calling the killing of Osama bin Laden. The U.N.'s Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights has called for an investigation. According to a U.N. special rapporteur, if the U.S. commandos were under shoot-to-kill orders and did so without offering Bin Laden a "meaningful prospect of surrender," his killing could have been a "cold-blooded execution.
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WORLD
July 22, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A Norwegian interior designer who said she was raped by a Sudanese colleague during a business trip to the United Arab Emirates city of Dubai earlier this year has been “pardoned” from her conviction and 16-month sentence for extramarital sex, drinking alcohol and providing false information to authorities. The decision Monday in the name of the Emirati ruler in Dubai cleared the way for 24-year-old Marte Deborah Dalelv to return to her Nordic homeland. But it in no way reflected a change in the Islamic federation's laws or practices that typically treat women against whom sexual violence is committed as criminals rather than victims.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2006 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
Law 5: So much depends on reputation -- guard it with your life. Hip-hop producer DJ Premier boiled this law down to "Reputation is the cornerstone of power" and had it tattooed on his arm. Law 8: Make other people come to you -- use bait if necessary. New York rapper L.G. had this one printed, epigram-style, on the in-leaf of his underground mix tape, "Industry Co-Sign II: The 14 Tracks of Power."
BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
It seems like an epidemic: Drivers talking and texting. Now federal regulators have put a number to the dangerous habit. At any given time, about 660,000 drivers are texting, tweeting, talking or otherwise preoccupied with their cellphones while speeding along the freeways or crawling through downtowns and suburban neighborhoods. That's more people than live in Baltimore. "There is no way to text and drive safely," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, whose agency released the survey results Friday.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Oklahoma's high court on Tuesday set the stage for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether states can restrict doctors from prescribing two drugs used to induce abortion in the early stages of pregnancy. The case could be the first test of whether the court's conservative majority will uphold a string of new state laws across the country that seek to strictly regulate legal abortions. In the last three years, Republican-led states have passed laws to limit abortion without banning it outright.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Discrimination happens every day, but obese people have little recourse when it happens to them, since there is no federal law protecting this population. But a survey reveals that public opinion may be in favor of anti-discrimination laws--to a point. Researchers from the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University surveyed 1,001 adults about their opinions on legal and legislative matters relating to obesity discrimination. They were asked how strongly they agreed or disagreed with statements such as "Obesity should be considered a disability under the Americans with Disability Act so that obese people will be protected from discrimination in the workplace," "The government should play a more active role in protecting overweight people from discrimination," "Overweight people should be subject to the same protections and benefits offered to people with physical disabilities," and "The government should play a more active role in protecting overweight people from discrimination.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Thirty of the 50 largest U.S. cities prohibit smoking indoors at all workplaces, restaurants and bars, the federal government reported. Just 12 years ago, only San Jose had such a law. As of Oct. 12, 16 of the largest cities had comprehensive smoke-free laws, and 14 additional cities were covered under state laws, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported this week. Overall, nearly half of Americans are covered by state or local smoke-free laws, compared with less than 3% in 2000, the CDC said in its report published in the agency's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2013 | By Joseph Tanfani
WASHINGTON - As drug dealers go, Lori Ann Newhouse was strictly small time. A high school dropout from a little Iowa town, Newhouse had three sons, a low-paying job as a telemarketer and a relentless methamphetamine habit. On St. Patrick's Day in 2011, Newhouse bought cold tablets used to make meth and traded them to a lab for a gram of the highly addictive drug. Federal agents, it turned out, were watching. Newhouse's bust landed her in the federal system in northern Iowa, where drug sentences have been among the harshest in the nation.
OPINION
January 7, 2001
Re your Jan. 1 article on some of the state's most important 2001 laws: By my count of the 81 new laws, two were bipartisan, 70 were sponsored by Democrats and nine by Republicans. No wonder Republicans can cry "too much government"--they just don't bother to do a thing. MARNE CARMEAN West Hollywood
SPORTS
August 7, 2013 | By David Wharton
President Obama has added his voice to a growing chorus of international leaders and sportsmen concerned that Russia's new anti-gay laws could be enforced at the 2014 Sochi Olympics. The laws ban "propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations," making it a crime to openly discuss gay rights and relationships where minors can overhear. "I think [Vladimir] Putin and Russia have a big stake in making sure the Olympics work," Obama told Jay Leno during an appearance on "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" on Tuesday night. "And I think they understand that for most of the countries that participate in the Olympics, we wouldn't tolerate gays and lesbians being treated differently.
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