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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2009 | By Jack Leonard
A former security guard accused of fatally shooting an 18-year-old college student in a Palmdale parking lot nearly a decade ago was convicted of murder Friday, authorities said. The verdict caps a lengthy legal saga that began when Raymond Lee Jennings first reported finding Michelle O'Keefe's body during a routine patrol of the park-and-ride lot. Investigators found the victim, a student at Antelope Valley College, slumped in the front seat of her Ford Mustang. She had been shot four times in the chest and face.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Howard Blume
Los Angeles school district officials announced a lawsuit settlement Tuesday that will provide $60 million in pay increases, services and staff at about three dozen schools, many hit hard by teacher layoffs. But the pact fails to deal with whether instructors should continue to be dismissed based on seniority. The case of Reed vs. L.A. Unified, filed in 2010, was intended to protect a school from disproportionate layoffs during difficult economic times. Three campuses named in the suit had lost about half their faculty because teachers had less experience than those elsewhere in the system.
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NEWS
March 25, 1987 | Associated Press
Evangelist Marvin Gorman filed a $90-million lawsuit Tuesday accusing fellow evangelist Jimmy Swaggart of trying to bankrupt Gorman's television ministry by spreading tales of sexual misconduct. Gorman said in the lawsuit filed in state District Court that he committed "an immoral act" with a woman in 1979. But he said he had repented and felt he was forgiven by God.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | Ken Dilanian
When federal prosecutors charged Colorado resident Jamshid Muhtorov in 2012 with providing support to a terrorist organization in his native Uzbekistan, court records suggested the FBI had secretly tapped his phones and read his emails. But it wasn't just the FBI. The Justice Department acknowledged in October that the National Security Agency had gathered evidence against Muhtorov under a 2008 law that authorizes foreign intelligence surveillance without warrants, much of it on the Internet.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
A woman has filed suit against McDonald's Corp., saying she was burned by hot coffee that spilled on her at one of the fast-food chain's Los Angeles restaurants. The lawsuit comes 20 years after a jury awarded $2.9 million to a woman who was badly burned after she spilled hot coffee into her lap at a McDonald's in Albuquerque. That verdict was widely criticized and became a rallying cry for advocates of legal reform. A judge later reduced the verdict to $640,000 and the case settled out of court for an undisclosed amount.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | By Brittany Levine
A Glendale resident, along with a Los Angeles resident and a nonprofit group, filed a lawsuit this week asking a federal judge to order the city of Glendale to remove  a controversial statue in a public park that honors women victimized by the Japanese government during World War II. The lawsuit is the latest attempt to remove the 1,100-pound statue for so-called comfort women, which was installed in July, the Glendale News-Press reported ...
NATIONAL
March 6, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
How drunk is too drunk to gamble? A Southern California man has sued a Las Vegas casino after he lost $500,000 on blackjack and pai gow over Super Bowl weekend, contending he shouldn't be responsible for his losses because he was blackout drunk. In the lawsuit, Mark Johnston, 52, of Ventura, accuses the Downtown Grand casino of plying him with drinks and lending him money so he could keep playing. Johnston, a longtime gambler, acknowledges that he went on a drinking binge before he ever reached the casino floor.
OPINION
July 17, 2013
Re "Asiana to sue over TV's pilot name flub," July 16 Asiana Airline's planned lawsuit over fake pilot names read during a TV news broadcast about the crash of Flight 214 really takes the cake. The airline says the mistake damaged its reputation. Asiana damaged its own reputation when its pilots apparently flew a perfectly good aircraft into a sea wall. Whether driven by home-office cultural insensitivity to an American sense of humor that thrives on disaster jokes or by a locally made decision to sue first and ask questions later, Asiana's decision to litigate is foolish.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer
The United States is recalling millions of faulty flushing mechanisms that have caused toilets to explode, creating “laceration risks” for toilet users. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission issued the warning about the Flushmate III Pressure-Assisted Flushing System, which was sold at Home Depot and Lowe's stores and to toilet manufacturers American Standard, Crane, Kohler, Eljer, Mansfield, St. Thomas and Gerber. The recall applies to devices manufactured between 1997 and 2008 -- about 2.3 million in the United States and 9,000 in Canada.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Facebook has agreed to settle a lawsuit that alleges the social network's so-called Sponsored Stories advertisements benefited from the "Likes" of users without giving them compensation or a chance to opt out. The terms of the settlement were not disclosed. The settlement was disclosed in a court document filed Tuesday in federal court in San Jose. The lawsuit, filed last year by five Facebook users , could have resulted in billions of dollars in losses for Facebook, according to Reuters . Sponsored Stories appear on Facebook users' pages with information taken from their friends that can include their Likes, names and pictures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Jack Leonard and Ani Ucar
A former patient at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center accused the hospital of negligence in a lawsuit filed Monday in which she said she was sexually assaulted last year by a certified nursing assistant after she underwent surgery. The woman alleged in the suit that the hospital failed to adequately respond to complaints of sexual assaults involving the same employee dating back more than a decade. In addition, the patient said Cedars-Sinai never interviewed her or made any effort to investigate after she reported the assault to the hospital June 13. Her lawsuit said she made several attempts to speak to someone at Cedars-Sinai before being told that the employee had been fired and that she could report the matter to police if she wanted further action taken.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Daniel Miller and John Horn
Melvin Mar's entrée to Hollywood was far from glamorous. As an unpaid intern for "Platoon" producer Arnold Kopelson, Mar was responsible for fetching his boss' lunch of matzo ball soup every day. Mar calculated to the minute how long it would take to walk from the production company's Century City offices to the Stage Deli nearby, buy the soup and decant it into a bowl on Kopelson's desk, still piping hot, at precisely 1 p.m. Mar parlayed...
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Matthew Vella certainly doesn't look like a troll. Vella is the regular-guy chief executive of Acacia Research Corp., which calls itself a patent outsource licensing company. The Newport Beach firm links up with inventors who fear that others are elbowing in on their patents or whose patents aren't making the money they could. "Our clients often can't afford to hire specialists that will help turn those patents into money," Vella said. "They are not looking to sell them necessarily, but if they are looking to get money because people are infringing their patents, we want to be their partner.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
Enrollments in the nation's healthcare program have nearly concluded, but for states whose insurance exchanges have been crippled by technical problems, a difficult phase is just beginning: potential legal battles and a race to overhaul their systems before federal grant money dries up. Officials in Oregon, Massachusetts and Maryland are exploring legal options as they sever contracts with those who created their sites. All three states are considering a move to the federal exchange, which had its own grievous start-up problems but is now largely stable, or licensing the technology of a more successful state such as Connecticut.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Ten Southern California surgery centers once affiliated with the defunct 1-800-GET-THIN advertising campaign are suing UnitedHealth Group Inc. to get reimbursed for hundreds of Lap-Band weight-loss procedures. The lawsuit comes amid federal and state investigations into allegations that the surgery centers defrauded UnitedHealth Group and other insurance companies, according to a government affidavit and a demand letter filed in two federal court cases. The 1-800-GET-THIN ads once blanketed Southern California freeway billboards and broadcast airwaves, but the campaign was halted after the Food and Drug Administration said the ads failed to disclose adequately the risks of weight-loss surgery.
OPINION
March 25, 2014 | By The Times editorial page
Opponents of the Affordable Care Act have mounted the most far-reaching legal challenge to the law since the (unsuccessful) attempt to have its insurance mandate declared unconstitutional. At issue is whether the subsidies the law provides to help lower-income adults buy policies will be available in the 34 states with federally launched insurance exchanges, rather than just the state-operated ones. The Internal Revenue Service ruled that any American who meets the income limits can qualify for a subsidy; the plaintiffs say subsidies should be available only in the 16 states that set up their own exchanges.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
Prop. 37 may have failed, but litigation against genetically modified ingredients goes on. Here's a new one: Pepperidge Farm has been sued in Colorado for claiming that its Goldfish crackers are “natural” when they contain ingredients derived from genetically engineered  soybeans. The plaintiff, Sonya Bolerjack, wants upward of $5 million in damages. Read an account, plus some industry and lawyer opinions at the website FoodNavigator.com. Also at this food and beverage litigation update provided by the law firm Shook, Hardy & Bacon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2012
The Arbitron ratings company agreed Monday to pay $400,000 to settle a lawsuit in which it was accused of under-representing black and Latino listeners in its surveys of radio tastes in California's largest cities. Lawyers for the state, Los Angeles and San Francisco — which will receive the money — contended that Arbitron's Portable People Meters system "dramatically" under-recruited from those populations when it began in 2008. Arbitron found participants mainly by calling land-line telephones, a process that tends to under-represent minority populations.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
Margie Beskau would seem to have a strong lawsuit against General Motors for millions in damages. Eight years ago, her 15-year-old daughter, Amy Rademaker, died in a Chevrolet Cobalt - one of the cars the automaker has now admitted had a deadly safety defect. A faulty ignition switch shut off the car, leaving its teenage driver without power steering, brakes or air bags. But Beskau probably will never collect in the civil courts, legal experts say, because GM has been absolved of all responsibility for crashes before the automaker's 2009 bankruptcy and federal bailout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
A patient whose personal information was stolen in a break-in at a medical billing contractor's office in Torrance has filed a class-action lawsuit against the company and Los Angeles County. Two Los Angeles law firms filed a complaint Friday in Superior Court. The suit was initially filed on behalf of a single patient whose name was not disclosed, but seeks class-action status. An office of Sutherland Healthcare Solutions, which handles billing and collections for the county's Department of Health Services and Department of Public Health, was burglarized Feb. 5 and computers were stolen.
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