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Lawsuit

BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles
Siri, the voice-activated personal assistant program built into the Apple iPhone 4S, is the target of yet another lawsuit. But unlike the March suit filed in New York , the latest lawsuit was filed on Tuesday in Los Angeles. The new suit, filed in a U.S. District Court by a David Jones living in California, makes the same basic accusation that the previous complaint did -- that Apple oversells Siri's abilities in advertising and TV commercials. Apple officials were unavailable for comment on the lawsuits on Wednesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Hollywood studios are turning the screws on Kim Dotcom, founder of the once infamous piracy website Megaupload. Several major U.S. studios on Monday filed a lawsuit against Kim Dotcom (a.k.a. Kim Schmitz and Kim Tim Jim Vestor) and others associated with Megaupload, alleging that they encouraged and profited from massive copyright infringement of movies and television shows before they were indicted on federal criminal charges and Megaupload was shut down. “When Megaupload.com was shut down in 2012 by U.S. law enforcement, it was by all estimates the largest and most active infringing website targeting creative content in the world,” said Steven Fabrizio, senior executive vice president and global general counsel of the Motion Picture Assn.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court threw out an invasion-of-privacy lawsuit against a San Diego-area police officer Monday, saying the Constitution does not make it clearly illegal for officers to pursue a potential suspect into a homeowner's private yard. The justices unanimously reversed a ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which had upheld the homeowner's lawsuit and said the officer had violated the 4th Amendment's ban on “unreasonable searches.” In the past, the justices had said officers in a “hot pursuit” of a fleeing suspect may enter a private home or yard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | By Brittany Levine
A Glendale resident, along with a Los Angeles resident and a nonprofit group, filed a lawsuit this week asking a federal judge to order the city of Glendale to remove  a controversial statue in a public park that honors women victimized by the Japanese government during World War II. The lawsuit is the latest attempt to remove the 1,100-pound statue for so-called comfort women, which was installed in July, the Glendale News-Press reported ...
SPORTS
January 18, 2012 | By Gary Klein
USC has settled a lawsuit brought by former running back Stafon Johnson, who was injured in 2009 when a bar carrying 275 pounds fell on his neck in the school's weight room. USC and Johnson released a joint statement Wednesday evening. "The University of Southern California and former student-athlete Stafon Johnson wish to jointly announce that Mr. Johnson has resolved his lawsuit against the university arising out of his September 28, 2009, weight room injury," the statement said.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel of San Diego has signaled that he's prepared to dismiss a bizarre lawsuit filed by Prime Healthcare Services against the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and the Service Employees International Union. In a tentative ruling handed down Thursday, Curiel said he found no merit in Prime's claim that Kaiser and the SEIU had conspired against the Ontario hospital company. Curiel's dismissal is subject to a hearing in his courtroom Friday and a final order to be handed down later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2011 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
A three-year-old lawsuit between Los Angeles City Atty. Carmen Trutanich and City Controller Wendy Greuel ended with a fizzle this week, with an appeals court declining to say whether elected officials can be audited at City Hall. The lawsuit, inherited by Greuel and Trutanich when they took office in 2009, originated with a dispute between City Atty. Rocky Delgadillo and City Controller Laura Chick. Delgadillo sued Chick in 2008, saying that she overstepped her authority when she attempted to audit his office's handling of workers' compensation programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Unlike last year, people hoping to jazz up their Academy Awards viewing parties this weekend with an oversized statuette resembling Oscar are now out of luck. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has settled a lawsuit it brought against an Edwardsville, Ill.-based events rental company for copyright infringement stemming from the alleged renting and selling of eight-foot statues that looked like the Oscar statuettes. The case against TheEventLine.com and its president, Robert Hollingsworth, was settled late last year and dismissed Nov. 19. In a lawsuit filed March 9 in U.S. District Court in Atlanta, the Academy had alleged that Hollingsworth continued to market, sell and rent the eight-foot statues after he'd been notified of the alleged infringement in a letter sent in March 2011.
SPORTS
April 25, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
A federal antitrust lawsuit filed Friday accused the NCAA and 11 conferences of fixing prices by capping the value of athletic scholarships. The lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota is the latest in a surge of litigation targeting the NCAA. This is at least the fourth lawsuit this year related to the gap between scholarships and the actual cost of attendance. The suit filed Friday is believed to be the first antitrust action against the NCAA to include a female plaintiff -- former Kennesaw State basketball player Ashley Holliday.
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