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Lawsuit

ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2012
The Arbitron ratings company agreed Monday to pay $400,000 to settle a lawsuit in which it was accused of under-representing black and Latino listeners in its surveys of radio tastes in California's largest cities. Lawyers for the state, Los Angeles and San Francisco — which will receive the money — contended that Arbitron's Portable People Meters system "dramatically" under-recruited from those populations when it began in 2008. Arbitron found participants mainly by calling land-line telephones, a process that tends to under-represent minority populations.
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NATIONAL
November 4, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court threw out an invasion-of-privacy lawsuit against a San Diego-area police officer Monday, saying the Constitution does not make it clearly illegal for officers to pursue a potential suspect into a homeowner's private yard. The justices unanimously reversed a ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which had upheld the homeowner's lawsuit and said the officer had violated the 4th Amendment's ban on “unreasonable searches.” In the past, the justices had said officers in a “hot pursuit” of a fleeing suspect may enter a private home or yard.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2009 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles
Dannon Co. settled a false-advertising lawsuit Friday, agreeing to set up a $35-million fund to reimburse consumers who bought its Activia and DanActive yogurts. The class-action lawsuit, filed in January 2008, alleged that Dannon lied when marketing its Activia and DanActive yogurts by trumpeting health benefits that didn't exist. The White Plains, N.Y.-based yogurt maker denied the claims and admitted no wrongdoing as part of the settlement. The decision to settle was based on Dannon's desire "to avoid the distraction and expense of litigation," spokesman Michael Neuwirth said.
SPORTS
January 30, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
Judge Josephine L. Stanton has approved a joint stipulation to dismiss the federal lawsuit filed by Oaks Christian, St. Bonaventure, Damien and St. Lucy's against the Southern Section, according to a court filing on Wednesday. It's an agreement where the schools and the Southern Section will take their disagreement to binding arbitration, according to individuals with knowledge of the situation but not authorized to speak on the matter. The hearing is set for March 4-5 in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Greenlight Capital has withdrawn its lawsuit against Apple Inc., having successfully blocked a vote on a controversial stock proposal.  The move was largely considered a formality. But it still marks the end of a brief but unusual public dust-up between Apple and a major shareholder. In a statement issued Friday, Greenlight said: "Apple removed the bundled proposal from the shareholder meeting therefore resolving the issue. "  QUIZ: Test your Apple knowledge   In the end, the legal dispute proved to be a minor annoyance for Apple.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The makers of "The Hobbit" trilogy aren't too happy about a low-budget direct-to-DVD knockoff. Warner Bros., Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and producer Saul Zaentz have filed a lawsuit against production studio the Asylum over its low budget direct-to-DVD "mockbuster" "Age of the Hobbits" that's designed to draft off consumer interest in the eagerly awaited "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. " Both are scheduled for release in December. Zaentz owns the trademark for author J.J.R. Tolkien's "Hobbit" and "Lord of the Rings" books for use in films and other media.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Who would have predicted that, in her late 80s, Harper Lee would have to file suit to get the control of "To Kill a Mockingbird" returned to her? According to a lawsuit filed in May, Lee, in failing health, had been "duped" into assigning the copyright of her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel to her literary agent, a lawyer. That's no small thing: A half century after its publication, "To Kill a Mockingbird" still sells more than 750,000 copies a year. In one typical six-month period in 2009, its royalties amounted to more than $1.6 million.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel of San Diego has signaled that he's prepared to dismiss a bizarre lawsuit filed by Prime Healthcare Services against the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and the Service Employees International Union. In a tentative ruling handed down Thursday, Curiel said he found no merit in Prime's claim that Kaiser and the SEIU had conspired against the Ontario hospital company. Curiel's dismissal is subject to a hearing in his courtroom Friday and a final order to be handed down later.
SPORTS
January 18, 2012 | By Gary Klein
USC has settled a lawsuit brought by former running back Stafon Johnson, who was injured in 2009 when a bar carrying 275 pounds fell on his neck in the school's weight room. USC and Johnson released a joint statement Wednesday evening. "The University of Southern California and former student-athlete Stafon Johnson wish to jointly announce that Mr. Johnson has resolved his lawsuit against the university arising out of his September 28, 2009, weight room injury," the statement said.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles
Siri, the voice-activated personal assistant program built into the Apple iPhone 4S, is the target of yet another lawsuit. But unlike the March suit filed in New York , the latest lawsuit was filed on Tuesday in Los Angeles. The new suit, filed in a U.S. District Court by a David Jones living in California, makes the same basic accusation that the previous complaint did -- that Apple oversells Siri's abilities in advertising and TV commercials. Apple officials were unavailable for comment on the lawsuits on Wednesday.
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