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Lawsuit

ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Who would have predicted that, in her late 80s, Harper Lee would have to file suit to get the control of "To Kill a Mockingbird" returned to her? According to a lawsuit filed in May, Lee, in failing health, had been "duped" into assigning the copyright of her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel to her literary agent, a lawyer. That's no small thing: A half century after its publication, "To Kill a Mockingbird" still sells more than 750,000 copies a year. In one typical six-month period in 2009, its royalties amounted to more than $1.6 million.
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BUSINESS
December 11, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
A Wal-Mart Stores Inc. contractor has agreed to pay $4.7 million to settle a lawsuit filed by 568 Southern California warehouse workers who said they were underpaid and denied rest and meal breaks. A federal judge has approved the settlement between Schneider Logistics and employees at its warehouse in Mira Loma. Wal-Mart paid Schneider Logistics to operate the warehouse, which handled merchandise sold in Wal-Mart stores, said Elizabeth Brennan, a spokeswoman for Warehouse Workers United, a labor group that advocates for better working conditions for warehouse employees.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel of San Diego has signaled that he's prepared to dismiss a bizarre lawsuit filed by Prime Healthcare Services against the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and the Service Employees International Union. In a tentative ruling handed down Thursday, Curiel said he found no merit in Prime's claim that Kaiser and the SEIU had conspired against the Ontario hospital company. Curiel's dismissal is subject to a hearing in his courtroom Friday and a final order to be handed down later.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Greenlight Capital has withdrawn its lawsuit against Apple Inc., having successfully blocked a vote on a controversial stock proposal.  The move was largely considered a formality. But it still marks the end of a brief but unusual public dust-up between Apple and a major shareholder. In a statement issued Friday, Greenlight said: "Apple removed the bundled proposal from the shareholder meeting therefore resolving the issue. "  QUIZ: Test your Apple knowledge   In the end, the legal dispute proved to be a minor annoyance for Apple.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
A Los Angeles woman has sued Sprint Corp., saying that one of its workers browsed through her traded-in phone, found two photographs of her engaged in sex and posted them on her Facebook page. The woman, identified in the lawsuit only as J. Johnson, said the Sprint employee used the Facebook application on her old phone to upload the photographs and make them visible to her family, friends and co-workers. The lawsuit, filed Tuesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court, seeks unspecified damages for invasion of privacy, infliction of emotional distress and identity theft.
SPORTS
January 30, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
Judge Josephine L. Stanton has approved a joint stipulation to dismiss the federal lawsuit filed by Oaks Christian, St. Bonaventure, Damien and St. Lucy's against the Southern Section, according to a court filing on Wednesday. It's an agreement where the schools and the Southern Section will take their disagreement to binding arbitration, according to individuals with knowledge of the situation but not authorized to speak on the matter. The hearing is set for March 4-5 in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Unlike last year, people hoping to jazz up their Academy Awards viewing parties this weekend with an oversized statuette resembling Oscar are now out of luck. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has settled a lawsuit it brought against an Edwardsville, Ill.-based events rental company for copyright infringement stemming from the alleged renting and selling of eight-foot statues that looked like the Oscar statuettes. The case against TheEventLine.com and its president, Robert Hollingsworth, was settled late last year and dismissed Nov. 19. In a lawsuit filed March 9 in U.S. District Court in Atlanta, the Academy had alleged that Hollingsworth continued to market, sell and rent the eight-foot statues after he'd been notified of the alleged infringement in a letter sent in March 2011.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The makers of "The Hobbit" trilogy aren't too happy about a low-budget direct-to-DVD knockoff. Warner Bros., Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and producer Saul Zaentz have filed a lawsuit against production studio the Asylum over its low budget direct-to-DVD "mockbuster" "Age of the Hobbits" that's designed to draft off consumer interest in the eagerly awaited "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. " Both are scheduled for release in December. Zaentz owns the trademark for author J.J.R. Tolkien's "Hobbit" and "Lord of the Rings" books for use in films and other media.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court threw out an invasion-of-privacy lawsuit against a San Diego-area police officer Monday, saying the Constitution does not make it clearly illegal for officers to pursue a potential suspect into a homeowner's private yard. The justices unanimously reversed a ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which had upheld the homeowner's lawsuit and said the officer had violated the 4th Amendment's ban on “unreasonable searches.” In the past, the justices had said officers in a “hot pursuit” of a fleeing suspect may enter a private home or yard.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Ten Southern California surgery centers once affiliated with the defunct 1-800-GET-THIN advertising campaign are suing UnitedHealth Group Inc. to get reimbursed for hundreds of Lap-Band weight-loss procedures. The lawsuit comes amid federal and state investigations into allegations that the surgery centers defrauded UnitedHealth Group and other insurance companies, according to a government affidavit and a demand letter filed in two federal court cases. The 1-800-GET-THIN ads once blanketed Southern California freeway billboards and broadcast airwaves, but the campaign was halted after the Food and Drug Administration said the ads failed to disclose adequately the risks of weight-loss surgery.
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