Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLawsuit
IN THE NEWS

Lawsuit

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
A patient whose personal information was stolen in a break-in at a medical billing contractor's office in Torrance has filed a class-action lawsuit against the company and Los Angeles County. Two Los Angeles law firms filed a complaint Friday in Superior Court. The suit was initially filed on behalf of a single patient whose name was not disclosed, but seeks class-action status. An office of Sutherland Healthcare Solutions, which handles billing and collections for the county's Department of Health Services and Department of Public Health, was burglarized Feb. 5 and computers were stolen.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | By Tim Logan
Three community groups sued Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday, demanding he restore more than $350 million in mortgage settlement funds that were used to plug state budget holes two years ago. The money - from California's slice of the $25 billion national mortgage settlement with banks in 2012 - was supposed to fund housing counseling and foreclosure relief programs. But with the state facing a $16-billion budget deficit that spring, Brown diverted it to the state's general fund and to pay down interest on housing bonds.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
Tennessee has to recognize the same-sex marriages of three couples despite a state constitutional amendment that defines marriage as between a man and woman, a federal judge ruled in a lawsuit Friday. While emphasizing that her preliminary injunction against the state was limited only to the three couples named in the suit, federal Judge Aleta A. Trauger noted that before long, the ban would probably be upended for all same-sex couples in Tennessee. At some point in the future, probably with the aid of further rulings, "in the eyes of the United States Constitution, the plaintiffs' marriages will be placed on equal footing with those of heterosexual couples and ... proscriptions against same-sex marriage will soon become a footnote in the annals of American history," Trauger wrote.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Two cups of beer are causing one big headache in Idaho. Just not the hangover kind. For years, thousands of hockey fans and other arena-goers in Idaho have paid $4 for a "small" beer, served in a squatty plastic cup, and $7 for a "large" beer, served in a taller cup. According to a lawsuit filed this week against CenturyLink Arena in Boise, the cups hold the same amount of beer, despite their apparent differences. The arena, operated as Block 22 LLC, is accused of knowingly misleading and defrauding customers and intentionally adopting “unconscionable methods” that amounted to deceptive business practices.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
McDonald's is facing several lawsuits filed this week by fast food workers who accuse the burger giant of systematically stealing their wages and committing other labor violations. The suits, filed Wednesday and Thursday, are seeking class-action status. Three complaints filed in the Bay Area allege that McDonald's failed to pay employees for all hours worked, skimped on overtime wages and break time, and altered pay records. A fourth case adds similar claims to a lawsuit already pending in Los Angeles County Superior Court against McDonald's.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Gawker Media is asking a California federal judge to throw out a lawsuit filed by Quentin Tarantino over his leaked screenplay for "The Hateful Eight," arguing it only facilitated the reading of the unproduced screenplay and didn't enable any copyright infringement. Tarantino sued Gawker for contributory copyright infringement in January, after its Defamer blog published a post titled "Here Is the Leaked Quentin Tarantino 'Hateful Eight' Script" with download links to third-party websites hosting copies of the document.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Gale Holland
A federal civil rights lawsuit filed Monday accuses the city of Los Angeles of malicious prosecution for charging a skid row community organizer with assault after she blew an air horn during a demonstration. City Atty. Carmen Trutanich charged Deborah Burton, 62, with misdemeanor assault and battery for allegedly blowing the horn in officials' ears during a 2011 skid row protest. Burton was acquitted of all charges last July. The suit says the charges were aimed at stifling political dissent.
OPINION
March 7, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
For more than a quarter of a century, investors have been able to bring class-action lawsuits against companies that have fraudulently inflated their stock prices without having to prove that each buyer of the stock had been individually duped. Now, industrial giant Halliburton Co. is trying to persuade the Supreme Court to make such lawsuits significantly harder, if not impossible, to bring. That would be a fantastic result for publicly traded companies, but a terrible one for the average investor.
SPORTS
March 7, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The first active Division I-A athlete to sue the NCAA over concussions wants out of the lawsuit. "I am no longer a plaintiff in the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois vs. NCAA," Stanford runner Jessica Tonn wrote in an email. "While I am supportive of advocacy for concussion awareness, I have no desire to be involved in legal matters of this or any other sort. " Filed Wednesday, the 65-page complaint alleges that the NCAA inadequately educated athletes and coaches about concussions and didn't implement return-to-play guidelines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
A federal jury has awarded $3.5 million to three Westminster police officers who said they are continually being passed over for promotions and assigned to “mall duty” because they are Latino. After deliberating for about three days, the Santa Ana jury returned a verdict Thursday, finding that officers Jose Flores, Ryan Reyes and Brian Perez should get damages for discrimination, said Melanie Poturica, an attorney representing the Orange County city. “In many ways this is a historic victory for officers of color,” said Victor Viramontes, an attorney representing the officers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|