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NATIONAL
August 23, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Internet has allowed tens of millions of Americans to be published writers. But it also has led to a surge in lawsuits from those who say they were hurt, defamed or threatened by what they read, according to groups that track media lawsuits. "It was probably inevitable, but we have seen a steady growth in litigation over content on the Internet," said Sandra Baron, executive director of the Media Law Resource Center in New York. Although bloggers may have a free-speech right to say what they want online, courts have found that they are not protected from being sued for their comments, even if they are posted anonymously.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Howard Blume
Los Angeles school district officials announced a lawsuit settlement Tuesday that will provide $60 million in pay increases, services and staff at about three dozen schools, many hit hard by teacher layoffs. But the pact fails to deal with whether instructors should continue to be dismissed based on seniority. The case of Reed vs. L.A. Unified, filed in 2010, was intended to protect a school from disproportionate layoffs during difficult economic times. Three campuses named in the suit had lost about half their faculty because teachers had less experience than those elsewhere in the system.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2011 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
Robert Hill did not join the Los Angeles Police Department to become a millionaire. And yet, that's what happened in September when city officials cut the veteran cop and his lawyer a check for nearly $4 million. The money was compensation for the snide comments and other abuse Hill suffered at the hands of other LAPD officers after he reported that a supervisor used racial slurs and embezzled department funds. In the last decade, at least 16 other officers have won million-dollar-plus jury verdicts or settlements from the city in lawsuits in which they leveled accusations of sexual harassment, racial discrimination, retaliation and other workplace injustices.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | Ken Dilanian
When federal prosecutors charged Colorado resident Jamshid Muhtorov in 2012 with providing support to a terrorist organization in his native Uzbekistan, court records suggested the FBI had secretly tapped his phones and read his emails. But it wasn't just the FBI. The Justice Department acknowledged in October that the National Security Agency had gathered evidence against Muhtorov under a 2008 law that authorizes foreign intelligence surveillance without warrants, much of it on the Internet.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
McDonald's is facing several lawsuits filed this week by fast food workers who accuse the burger giant of systematically stealing their wages and committing other labor violations. The suits, filed Wednesday and Thursday, are seeking class-action status. Three complaints filed in the Bay Area allege that McDonald's failed to pay employees for all hours worked, skimped on overtime wages and break time, and altered pay records. A fourth case adds similar claims to a lawsuit already pending in Los Angeles County Superior Court against McDonald's.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson failed to warn doctors of the risks of defective metal hip implants that it didn't test properly, a lawyer told a Los Angeles jury in the first of 10,000 lawsuits over the device to go to trial. Loren Kransky, a retired prison guard who got an ASR XL hip implant in 2007, sued in state court in 2011 and had the device replaced last year. J&J, the world's biggest seller of healthcare products, withdrew the devices in August 2010 after citing British data showing more than 12% failed within five years.
SPORTS
May 11, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
Hall of Fame receiver Art Monk is the lead plaintiff in a class-action lawsuit filed against the NFL and helmet maker Riddell Inc. over long-term injuries as a result of concussions. The 82-page lawsuit was filed in Los Angeles last week along with two similar ones, with the three encompassing 193 former players. The suits were filed by the L.A.-based firm Girardi Keese. According to NFLConcussionLitigation, which first reported the latest litigation, more than 2,000 former players are currently suing the league over concussions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
Members of the Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday expressed concern and frustration over the findings of an audit that concluded the LAPD fails to take basic steps to curtail costly lawsuits filed by officers. The audit , conducted by the commission's inspector general, found the LAPD routinely destroys case files, keeps inaccurate and incomplete information on lawsuits, and has no system in place to identify recurring issues that lead to problems between officers. The Times first reported on the audit last week . Commissioner Rafael Bernardino wasted no time at the panel's weekly meeting in leveling a sharp criticism at department officials, calling the audit findings "horrible.
SPORTS
July 17, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 The Southern Section has received an extension on when it needs to respond to three lawsuits filed by four private high schools last month.  The attorney for the Southern Section must respond by Aug. 9 to the federal suits filed by Ventura St. Bonaventure, La Verne Damien, Westlake Village Oaks Christian and Glendora St. Lucy's challenging the section's decision to place the schools' sports programs in the parochial area as part of releaguing in 2014. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By August Brown
If you're a Black Keys fan and you've ever been enticed to order a Meat Lovers' Supreme at Pizza Hut or invest in a storage shed from Home Depot, there might have been a subliminal reason. Each company used songs in commercials that sounded an awful lot like tracks from the Black Keys' smash album "El Camino," namely "Lonely Boy" and "Gold on the Ceiling. " The Black Keys noticed this too, and have reportedly settled the resulting lawsuits around copyright infringement of the band's music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Jack Leonard and Ani Ucar
A former patient at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center accused the hospital of negligence in a lawsuit filed Monday in which she said she was sexually assaulted last year by a certified nursing assistant after she underwent surgery. The woman alleged in the suit that the hospital failed to adequately respond to complaints of sexual assaults involving the same employee dating back more than a decade. In addition, the patient said Cedars-Sinai never interviewed her or made any effort to investigate after she reported the assault to the hospital June 13. Her lawsuit said she made several attempts to speak to someone at Cedars-Sinai before being told that the employee had been fired and that she could report the matter to police if she wanted further action taken.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Daniel Miller and John Horn
Melvin Mar's entrée to Hollywood was far from glamorous. As an unpaid intern for "Platoon" producer Arnold Kopelson, Mar was responsible for fetching his boss' lunch of matzo ball soup every day. Mar calculated to the minute how long it would take to walk from the production company's Century City offices to the Stage Deli nearby, buy the soup and decant it into a bowl on Kopelson's desk, still piping hot, at precisely 1 p.m. Mar parlayed...
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Matthew Vella certainly doesn't look like a troll. Vella is the regular-guy chief executive of Acacia Research Corp., which calls itself a patent outsource licensing company. The Newport Beach firm links up with inventors who fear that others are elbowing in on their patents or whose patents aren't making the money they could. "Our clients often can't afford to hire specialists that will help turn those patents into money," Vella said. "They are not looking to sell them necessarily, but if they are looking to get money because people are infringing their patents, we want to be their partner.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
Enrollments in the nation's healthcare program have nearly concluded, but for states whose insurance exchanges have been crippled by technical problems, a difficult phase is just beginning: potential legal battles and a race to overhaul their systems before federal grant money dries up. Officials in Oregon, Massachusetts and Maryland are exploring legal options as they sever contracts with those who created their sites. All three states are considering a move to the federal exchange, which had its own grievous start-up problems but is now largely stable, or licensing the technology of a more successful state such as Connecticut.
OPINION
March 25, 2014 | By The Times editorial page
Opponents of the Affordable Care Act have mounted the most far-reaching legal challenge to the law since the (unsuccessful) attempt to have its insurance mandate declared unconstitutional. At issue is whether the subsidies the law provides to help lower-income adults buy policies will be available in the 34 states with federally launched insurance exchanges, rather than just the state-operated ones. The Internal Revenue Service ruled that any American who meets the income limits can qualify for a subsidy; the plaintiffs say subsidies should be available only in the 16 states that set up their own exchanges.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
Margie Beskau would seem to have a strong lawsuit against General Motors for millions in damages. Eight years ago, her 15-year-old daughter, Amy Rademaker, died in a Chevrolet Cobalt - one of the cars the automaker has now admitted had a deadly safety defect. A faulty ignition switch shut off the car, leaving its teenage driver without power steering, brakes or air bags. But Beskau probably will never collect in the civil courts, legal experts say, because GM has been absolved of all responsibility for crashes before the automaker's 2009 bankruptcy and federal bailout.
SPORTS
August 29, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
Lawyers representing the Southern Section have filed a court motion seeking dismissal of three federal lawsuits by four private high schools filed in the wake of the Southern Section's decision to move the schools into a different geographic group for sports competition last school year. St. Bonaventure, Oaks Christian, Damien and St. Lucy's sued the Southern Section and are seeking an injunction to prevent the Southern Section from placing the schools into the parochial area for sports releaguing in 2014-15.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2009 | Evan Halper
Well-connected lobbyists, political pressure and a good turnout at committee hearings used to be the special interest recipe for protecting turf in the state budget. Now, a potent new ingredient is being increasingly thrown into the mix: top-shelf litigators. Lawyers are being drafted in droves to unravel spending plans passed by the Legislature and signed by the governor. The goal of these litigators is to get back money their clients lost in the budget process. They are having considerable success, winning one lawsuit after another, costing the state billions of dollars and throwing California's budget process into further tumult.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
A patient whose personal information was stolen in a break-in at a medical billing contractor's office in Torrance has filed a class-action lawsuit against the company and Los Angeles County. Two Los Angeles law firms filed a complaint Friday in Superior Court. The suit was initially filed on behalf of a single patient whose name was not disclosed, but seeks class-action status. An office of Sutherland Healthcare Solutions, which handles billing and collections for the county's Department of Health Services and Department of Public Health, was burglarized Feb. 5 and computers were stolen.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | By Tim Logan
Three community groups sued Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday, demanding he restore more than $350 million in mortgage settlement funds that were used to plug state budget holes two years ago. The money - from California's slice of the $25 billion national mortgage settlement with banks in 2012 - was supposed to fund housing counseling and foreclosure relief programs. But with the state facing a $16-billion budget deficit that spring, Brown diverted it to the state's general fund and to pay down interest on housing bonds.
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