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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2011 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Francisco -- Smokers may sue the tobacco industry once they develop a disease like lung cancer, even if they suffered different smoking-related ailments years earlier, the California Supreme Court ruled unanimously Thursday. The decision is likely to keep lawsuits alive that might otherwise have been thrown out because of expired legal deadlines and allow new suits to be filed, lawyers who filed the suit said. In the case before the court, Nikki Pooshs, a former smoker, was diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 1989 and a couple of years later with periodontal disease, both attributable to smoking.
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SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The racist comments purportedly made by Donald Sterling in the audio recording that surfaced Saturday via TMZ.com are the latest in a years-long string of racially charged incidents linked to the real estate mogul. In 2009, Sterling agreed to a $2.765-million settlement in a case that alleged discrimination against African Americans, Latinos and others at apartment buildings he owned in Los Angeles County. Sterling denied the charges by the Justice Department and in two separate lawsuits by former tenants.
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BUSINESS
January 25, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson failed to warn doctors of the risks of defective metal hip implants that it didn't test properly, a lawyer told a Los Angeles jury in the first of 10,000 lawsuits over the device to go to trial. Loren Kransky, a retired prison guard who got an ASR XL hip implant in 2007, sued in state court in 2011 and had the device replaced last year. J&J, the world's biggest seller of healthcare products, withdrew the devices in August 2010 after citing British data showing more than 12% failed within five years.
SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The phone didn't get a break at Elgin Baylor's Los Angeles-area home Saturday afternoon. Everyone seemed to want to speak to the former Clippers general manager after the racist recording attributed to the team's owner, Donald Sterling, emerged late Friday on TMZ.com. Baylor declined to comment until a family attorney was consulted, but the 79-year-old member of the NBA's Hall of Fame is part of Sterling's history with racial issues. Baylor sued Sterling and others in February 2009 in L.A. Superior Court for wrongful termination and discrimination on the basis of age and race.
SPORTS
May 11, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
Hall of Fame receiver Art Monk is the lead plaintiff in a class-action lawsuit filed against the NFL and helmet maker Riddell Inc. over long-term injuries as a result of concussions. The 82-page lawsuit was filed in Los Angeles last week along with two similar ones, with the three encompassing 193 former players. The suits were filed by the L.A.-based firm Girardi Keese. According to NFLConcussionLitigation, which first reported the latest litigation, more than 2,000 former players are currently suing the league over concussions.
NATIONAL
August 23, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Internet has allowed tens of millions of Americans to be published writers. But it also has led to a surge in lawsuits from those who say they were hurt, defamed or threatened by what they read, according to groups that track media lawsuits. "It was probably inevitable, but we have seen a steady growth in litigation over content on the Internet," said Sandra Baron, executive director of the Media Law Resource Center in New York. Although bloggers may have a free-speech right to say what they want online, courts have found that they are not protected from being sued for their comments, even if they are posted anonymously.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2011 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
Robert Hill did not join the Los Angeles Police Department to become a millionaire. And yet, that's what happened in September when city officials cut the veteran cop and his lawyer a check for nearly $4 million. The money was compensation for the snide comments and other abuse Hill suffered at the hands of other LAPD officers after he reported that a supervisor used racial slurs and embezzled department funds. In the last decade, at least 16 other officers have won million-dollar-plus jury verdicts or settlements from the city in lawsuits in which they leveled accusations of sexual harassment, racial discrimination, retaliation and other workplace injustices.
SPORTS
July 17, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 The Southern Section has received an extension on when it needs to respond to three lawsuits filed by four private high schools last month.  The attorney for the Southern Section must respond by Aug. 9 to the federal suits filed by Ventura St. Bonaventure, La Verne Damien, Westlake Village Oaks Christian and Glendora St. Lucy's challenging the section's decision to place the schools' sports programs in the parochial area as part of releaguing in 2014. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
SPORTS
August 29, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
Lawyers representing the Southern Section have filed a court motion seeking dismissal of three federal lawsuits by four private high schools filed in the wake of the Southern Section's decision to move the schools into a different geographic group for sports competition last school year. St. Bonaventure, Oaks Christian, Damien and St. Lucy's sued the Southern Section and are seeking an injunction to prevent the Southern Section from placing the schools into the parochial area for sports releaguing in 2014-15.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
Members of the Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday expressed concern and frustration over the findings of an audit that concluded the LAPD fails to take basic steps to curtail costly lawsuits filed by officers. The audit , conducted by the commission's inspector general, found the LAPD routinely destroys case files, keeps inaccurate and incomplete information on lawsuits, and has no system in place to identify recurring issues that lead to problems between officers. The Times first reported on the audit last week . Commissioner Rafael Bernardino wasted no time at the panel's weekly meeting in leveling a sharp criticism at department officials, calling the audit findings "horrible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Donald Sterling's wife of more than 50 years describes his alleged mistress as a gold digger who seduces older, wealthy men and persuades them to shower her with gifts, according to a lawsuit filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court on March 7. The Clippers team owner and a woman identified as V. Stiviano allegedly began an affair after meeting at the 2010 Super Bowl game and were still in the relationship as of the filing date, according to...
SPORTS
April 25, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
A federal antitrust lawsuit filed Friday accused the NCAA and 11 conferences of fixing prices by capping the value of athletic scholarships. The lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota is the latest in a surge of litigation targeting the NCAA. This is at least the fourth lawsuit this year related to the gap between scholarships and the actual cost of attendance. The suit filed Friday is believed to be the first antitrust action against the NCAA to include a female plaintiff -- former Kennesaw State basketball player Ashley Holliday.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
In the wake of a $10-million payout to a whistleblower, UCLA's School of Medicine is drawing more scrutiny over its financial ties to industry and the possibility that they compromised patient care. A new study in this month's Journal of the American Medical Assn. raised a red flag generally about university officials such as Eugene Washington, the dean of UCLA's medical school who also serves on the board of healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson. The world's biggest medical-products maker paid Washington more than $260,000 in cash and stock last year as a company director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By David Zahniser
The Times filed a motion Friday opposing a court order that would bar public access to records in a sexual harassment case involving Los Angeles City Councilman Jose Huizar. The newspaper said it is seeking to be heard on the public's right to access records in the lawsuit filed last year by former Huizar Deputy Chief of Staff Francine Godoy because the case involves "matters of substantial public interest. " Huizar attorney Dennis Walsh filed paperwork four weeks ago seeking a protective order to prohibit disclosure of "private and sensitive information" until it becomes evidence at trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By David Zahniser and Emily Alpert Reyes, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Scores of people who suffered damage when the Powerhouse fire scorched stretches of northern Los Angeles County are suing the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, alleging the utility started the massive blaze and failed to properly maintain power lines and equipment. The fire destroyed dozens of homes and burned more than 30,000 acres over the course of several days last year. U.S. Forest Service officials have estimated the cost of battling the blaze at more than $16 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
A federal judge has tossed out Quentin Tarantino's copyright infringement lawsuit against Gawker Media for linking to his leaked, unproduced script for "The Hateful Eight," but the legal battle may be far from over. U.S. District Court Judge John F. Walter granted Gawker's motion to dismiss the suit while also giving Tarantino's legal team until May 1 to amend and refile the contributory copyright complaint, which accused Gawker of disseminating copies of Tarantino's script on its Defamer website and said the company "has made a business of predatory journalism.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
More than 2,000 former NFL players and their families will file a “master complaint” in court Thursday, consolidating their nearly 100 concussion-related lawsuits against the NFL. The complaint will be filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, alleging that the NFL “deliberately and fraudulently concealed from its players the link between football-related head impacts and long-term neurological injuries.” ...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2009 | Evan Halper
Well-connected lobbyists, political pressure and a good turnout at committee hearings used to be the special interest recipe for protecting turf in the state budget. Now, a potent new ingredient is being increasingly thrown into the mix: top-shelf litigators. Lawyers are being drafted in droves to unravel spending plans passed by the Legislature and signed by the governor. The goal of these litigators is to get back money their clients lost in the budget process. They are having considerable success, winning one lawsuit after another, costing the state billions of dollars and throwing California's budget process into further tumult.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
George Zimmerman's parents are picking a court fight with Roseanne Barr. The entertainer admitted in a court filing this week that she had posted the address of Robert and Gladys Zimmerman on Twitter during the heated controversy over whether their son should have shot unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin two years ago. The Zimmermans contend that her tweet forced them to flee because media and protesters descended on their neighborhood....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
A controversy-riddled water district involved in a federal corruption investigation is in danger of losing its insurance, a political black eye that could have implications for the agency and its 2 million customers. The Assn. of California Water Agencies Joint Powers Insurance Authority has recommended to its board that it drop the employment liability insurance for Central Basin Municipal Water District, citing the circus-like atmosphere at the agency. The authority insures hundreds of water districts across the state, and this would be only the second time in its 35-year history that it canceled coverage for a water district.
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