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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
This post has been updated. See note below. Follow me down the rabbit hole for a moment while we discuss the case of Kimberly Erin Caselman, a Pier 1 sales associate in San Jose who loves her job and informed her boss in November that she was two months pregnant with her second child. On the recommendation of her obstetrician, Caselman, 31, also informed Pier 1 that she was not to lift any objects heavier than 15 pounds, or climb ladders. Her pregnancy is not high-risk, but that seemed prudent, and not particularly limiting.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County sheriff's officials are revisiting the department's policy governing when and how deputies can use physical force, in light of a court ruling last year that officers can be held liable even for actions that led up to a shooting. The daughter of Shane Hayes, a mentally ill man who was shot and killed in his home by San Diego County sheriff's deputies after brandishing a knife, filed a wrongful death suit against the department. She argued that the deputies provoked the confrontation that led to the shooting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
When Mayor Eric Garcetti unveiled his first budget this week, he proudly announced that he was doubling funding to fix broken sidewalks from $10 million to $20 million. There's just one problem: None of the money that was budgeted for this year has been spent so far. And it remains unclear how much of it will be used before the budget year comes to an end June 30. Any unencumbered money will be swept back into Los Angeles' general fund. City officials said they held off on sidewalk spending because of a lawsuit filed by disabled residents who assert that broken sidewalks infringe on their rights to public access.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Howard Blume
Los Angeles school district officials announced a lawsuit settlement Tuesday that will provide $60 million in pay increases, services and staff at about three dozen schools, many hit hard by teacher layoffs. But the pact fails to deal with whether instructors should continue to be dismissed based on seniority. The case of Reed vs. L.A. Unified, filed in 2010, was intended to protect a school from disproportionate layoffs during difficult economic times. Three campuses named in the suit had lost about half their faculty because teachers had less experience than those elsewhere in the system.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | Ken Dilanian
When federal prosecutors charged Colorado resident Jamshid Muhtorov in 2012 with providing support to a terrorist organization in his native Uzbekistan, court records suggested the FBI had secretly tapped his phones and read his emails. But it wasn't just the FBI. The Justice Department acknowledged in October that the National Security Agency had gathered evidence against Muhtorov under a 2008 law that authorizes foreign intelligence surveillance without warrants, much of it on the Internet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Jack Leonard and Ani Ucar
A former patient at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center accused the hospital of negligence in a lawsuit filed Monday in which she said she was sexually assaulted last year by a certified nursing assistant after she underwent surgery. The woman alleged in the suit that the hospital failed to adequately respond to complaints of sexual assaults involving the same employee dating back more than a decade. In addition, the patient said Cedars-Sinai never interviewed her or made any effort to investigate after she reported the assault to the hospital June 13. Her lawsuit said she made several attempts to speak to someone at Cedars-Sinai before being told that the employee had been fired and that she could report the matter to police if she wanted further action taken.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Hollywood studios are turning the screws on Kim Dotcom, founder of the once infamous piracy website Megaupload. Several major U.S. studios on Monday filed a lawsuit against Kim Dotcom (a.k.a. Kim Schmitz and Kim Tim Jim Vestor) and others associated with Megaupload, alleging that they encouraged and profited from massive copyright infringement of movies and television shows before they were indicted on federal criminal charges and Megaupload was shut down. “When Megaupload.com was shut down in 2012 by U.S. law enforcement, it was by all estimates the largest and most active infringing website targeting creative content in the world,” said Steven Fabrizio, senior executive vice president and global general counsel of the Motion Picture Assn.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Daniel Miller and John Horn
Melvin Mar's entrée to Hollywood was far from glamorous. As an unpaid intern for "Platoon" producer Arnold Kopelson, Mar was responsible for fetching his boss' lunch of matzo ball soup every day. Mar calculated to the minute how long it would take to walk from the production company's Century City offices to the Stage Deli nearby, buy the soup and decant it into a bowl on Kopelson's desk, still piping hot, at precisely 1 p.m. Mar parlayed...
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Matthew Vella certainly doesn't look like a troll. Vella is the regular-guy chief executive of Acacia Research Corp., which calls itself a patent outsource licensing company. The Newport Beach firm links up with inventors who fear that others are elbowing in on their patents or whose patents aren't making the money they could. "Our clients often can't afford to hire specialists that will help turn those patents into money," Vella said. "They are not looking to sell them necessarily, but if they are looking to get money because people are infringing their patents, we want to be their partner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
A judge who sided with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority this week in a drawn-out battle over the seismic and environmental effects of the planned Westside subway "did not consider the facts," the superintendent of the Beverly Hills Unified School District told The Times on Thursday.  On Wednesday, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge John A. Torribio ruled that Metro followed environmental law when assessing the possible risks of...
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