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OPINION
March 7, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
For more than a quarter of a century, investors have been able to bring class-action lawsuits against companies that have fraudulently inflated their stock prices without having to prove that each buyer of the stock had been individually duped. Now, industrial giant Halliburton Co. is trying to persuade the Supreme Court to make such lawsuits significantly harder, if not impossible, to bring. That would be a fantastic result for publicly traded companies, but a terrible one for the average investor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
A federal jury has awarded $3.5 million to three Westminster police officers who said they are continually being passed over for promotions and assigned to “mall duty” because they are Latino. After deliberating for about three days, the Santa Ana jury returned a verdict Thursday, finding that officers Jose Flores, Ryan Reyes and Brian Perez should get damages for discrimination, said Melanie Poturica, an attorney representing the Orange County city. “In many ways this is a historic victory for officers of color,” said Victor Viramontes, an attorney representing the officers.
SPORTS
March 7, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The first active Division I-A athlete to sue the NCAA over concussions wants out of the lawsuit. "I am no longer a plaintiff in the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois vs. NCAA," Stanford runner Jessica Tonn wrote in an email. "While I am supportive of advocacy for concussion awareness, I have no desire to be involved in legal matters of this or any other sort. " Filed Wednesday, the 65-page complaint alleges that the NCAA inadequately educated athletes and coaches about concussions and didn't implement return-to-play guidelines.
SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The addition of Stanford runner Jessica Tonn to the dozens of current and former athletes suing the NCAA over concussions Wednesday is the latest in a stream of litigation targeting the organization. At last year's Final Four, NCAA President Mark Emmert quipped, “If you're not getting sued, you're not doing anything.” By last fall, NCAA chief legal officer Donald Remy estimated the organization faced 20 pending lawsuits . That number seems to grow each day. Tonn's lawsuit increased the number of concussion plaintiffs to 74, according to one database . That number has shot up since settlement talks commenced in November between the NCAA and attorneys who filed the first concussion lawsuit in 2011.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Halliburton Co. and other U.S. corporations urged the Supreme Court to reverse a 26-year-old ruling that triggered an avalanche of class-action lawsuits by investors in publicly traded companies. But based on justices' comments Wednesday, it appeared they would fall at least one vote short of a major victory. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy explored the idea of a "midway" ruling that would make it slightly harder, but not impossible, to bring such suits.
SPORTS
March 4, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The NFL on Tuesday reinstated former Seattle Seahawks cornerback Brandon Browner from an indefinite suspension for violating the league's substance abuse policy. The suspension for using marijuana ended Browner's season in December and thrust the 29-year-old's career into doubt. In a  dispatch on Twitter , however, the open-ended punishment went up in smoke. “I realize now more than ever that being part of the NFL is not a right but a privilege,” Browner wrote. “I am grateful that Commissioner [Roger]
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
A Los Angeles woman has sued Sprint Corp., saying that one of its workers browsed through her traded-in phone, found two photographs of her engaged in sex and posted them on her Facebook page. The woman, identified in the lawsuit only as J. Johnson, said the Sprint employee used the Facebook application on her old phone to upload the photographs and make them visible to her family, friends and co-workers. The lawsuit, filed Tuesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court, seeks unspecified damages for invasion of privacy, infliction of emotional distress and identity theft.
WORLD
February 27, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
MUMBAI, India - The Hindu epic "Ramayana" features a 10-headed villain, a magical golden deer and the flying monkey god Hanuman. But when an American religion scholar described the canonical poem as fictional, some religious conservatives were shocked. Angered by what they called an insulting, inaccurate and sexualized depiction of India's predominant faith by University of Chicago divinity professor Wendy Doniger, Hindu activists waged a four-year court battle against her book "The Hindus: An Alternative History.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | By Brittany Levine
A Glendale resident, along with a Los Angeles resident and a nonprofit group, filed a lawsuit this week asking a federal judge to order the city of Glendale to remove  a controversial statue in a public park that honors women victimized by the Japanese government during World War II. The lawsuit is the latest attempt to remove the 1,100-pound statue for so-called comfort women, which was installed in July, the Glendale News-Press reported ...
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - Seventy-two years after Nazis began deporting French Jews to concentration camps, the French government is negotiating to pay reparations for the first time to several hundred Holocaust survivors now living in the U.S. who survived unspeakable conditions while being transported in government-owned rail cars and in the death camps at the end of the line. Stuart Eizenstat, a Washington lawyer who advises the State Department on Holocaust issues, said in an interview Friday that the French government entered into formal talks Feb. 6 and appeared to be intent on wrapping up negotiations by the end of the year.
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