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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Don't ask Justin Bieber about Usher, Selena Gomez, where he's traveled, who works for him -- or pretty much anything. The 20-year-old pop star sat through a 4½-hour deposition last Thursday where he was grilled by a lawyer representing a paparazzo who claimed one of Bieber's bodyguards attacked him last year. Apparently, it didn't go so well. In video clips of the lengthy legal proceeding that surfaced online early Monday, Bieber appears annoyed and even bored by the line of questioning posed by the pap's attorney.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By David Zahniser
Attorneys for Los Angeles have recommended that the City Council pay $185,000 to settle a lawsuit over a car crash involving Councilman Jose Huizar, according to records and interviews. The payment stems from an incident in 2012, in which Huizar - driving a city-owned SUV - rear-ended a car driven by David Ceja, a former Huntington Park police officer. Humberto Guizar, Ceja's lawyer, described the payment as a compromise, saying that he could have "possibly gotten a seven-figure amount" had the case gone to trial.
SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | By Sam Farmer
Kevin O'Neill, the longtime Miami Dolphins trainer fired in the wake of the team's bullying scandal, is firing back at the franchise through his lawyer. Attorney Jack Scarola issued a statement Thursday on behalf of O'Neill, who in the recently released report of investigator Ted Wells is accused of laughing at inappropriate jokes aimed at offensive tackle Jonathan Martin and an unnamed assistant trainer. O'Neill accompanied Dolphins executives, coaches and scouts to last month's scouting combine in Indianapolis, but was fired on the eve of the annual event.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- Prosecutors portrayed an alleged Al Qaeda spokesman as a member of Osama bin Laden's inner circle Wednesday as they began trying to convince a jury that he knew in advance of terrorist plots against U.S. targets, even if he did not plan or take part in them.  But the defense attorney for Sulaiman abu Ghaith, who faces three terrorism-related charges, said the government was counting on fear and anger generated by the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks to convict a Muslim husband and father who had said some "dumb" things in the past.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Lawyers will appeal a federal judge's ruling that Kentucky's ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional, but they won't be state Atty. Gen. Jack Conway's lawyers. In a news conference Tuesday that ended with tears streaming down his face, Conway said that defending the state's ban "would be defending discrimination. "  Conway, a Democrat, began choking up when he mentioned his wife and how he had prayed over a tough decision. (Video of his news conference is shown above.) "In the end, this issue is really larger than any single person, and it's about placing people above politics," Conway told reporters.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Outside accountants and lawyers who reveal fraud and wrongdoing at publicly traded companies are protected as whistle-blowers just as employees are, the Supreme Court ruled, expanding the reach of an anti-fraud law passed in the wake of the collapse of companies such as Enron Corp. and WorldCom Inc. The 6-3 decision Tuesday will affect the mutual fund and financial services industries in particular because they rely heavily on outside contractors and advisors. Denying whistle-blower protection to all outside employees of such companies would leave a "huge hole" in the 2002 law, said Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, noting that most mutual fund companies hire independent investment advisors and contractors rather than employees.
OPINION
February 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
In America you're innocent until proven guilty. But the federal government can seize your assets before trial and prevent you from using them to hire the lawyer of your choice, even though the right to counsel is protected by the 6th Amendment. That's an injustice, and it was compounded this week by the Supreme Court. In 2007, Kerri Kaley, a sales representative for a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, and her husband Brian were indicted on charges that they had participated in a scheme to resell medical devices allegedly stolen from hospitals; they maintained that the hospitals no longer had any use for the devices.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Attorneys for the family of a man executed in Texas appealed to the governor and state parole board this week to reconsider the case in light of new evidence that he was wrongfully convicted of killing his three young daughters. “It's astonishing that 10 years after Todd Willingham was executed we are still uncovering evidence showing what a grave injustice this case represents,” said Barry Scheck, co-director of the New York-based Innocence Project assisting with the appeal. “The Texas clemency system is severely broken and must be fixed.” Cameron Todd Willingham, 36, was put to death a decade ago for setting a 1991 house fire in Corsicana, about 55 miles south of Dallas, that killed his children.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2014 | By Richard Serrano
WASHINGTON - Days before his Sept. 11-related terrorism trial begins in New York, accused Al Qaeda propagandist Sulaiman Abu Ghaith again asked a federal judge to dismiss or postpone the proceedings, contending the government had charged the wrong man. In a federal court filing made public Thursday, Ghaith's attorneys said newly obtained evidence suggests a second individual with a similar name and past, who is currently incarcerated at Guantanamo Bay,...
NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON -- Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer began meeting Wednesday with key groups before deciding the fate of legislation that would give more protection to businesses citing religious beliefs in denying service to gays. The meetings come as a group representing Latino lawyers announced it was moving its scheduled convention out of state. The Hispanic National Bar Assn. said it will move its 40th annual convention, scheduled for September 2015 in Phoenix, because the legislation, SB 1062, discriminates against members of Arizona's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.
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