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Laxatives

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NEWS
August 30, 1997 | CURT SUPLEE, THE WASHINGTON POST
The Food and Drug Administration is proposing a ban on over-the-counter products containing phenolphthalein, a principal component in most varieties of Ex-Lax and numerous other laxative products, because, it said, the compound poses "a potential cancer risk to people who use this ingredient at higher than recommended doses or for extended periods of time."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | By Emily Alpert, Los Angeles Times
Bryan Piperno was just 9 years old when he began keeping his secret. The Simi Valley youngster tossed out lunches or claimed he ate elsewhere. As he grew older, he started purging after eating. Even after his vomiting landed him in the emergency room during college, he lied to hide the truth. Piperno, now 25, slowly fended off his eating disorder with time and care, including a stay in a residential treatment facility. But surveys show a rising number of teenage boys in Los Angeles now struggle with similar problems.
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HEALTH
November 30, 2009 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Q: Is there anything new on the generic version of Wellbutrin XL? My wife had done well on the brand name and then the Watson generic bupropion for several years. She was abruptly switched to Teva's Budeprion last spring. Her depression returned. Within a month, she was on the brink of suicide. When I realized how severe her situation was, I ran out and purchased brand-name Wellbutrin. It took less than a week for her to return to her normal, cheerful self. I work for a pharmaceutical company, and I would never have thought there could be such an issue with a generic.
SCIENCE
May 14, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details. A colonoscopy is a life-saving procedure, identifying polyps and early-stage tumors so they can be removed before they grow and spread. But many people refuse to undergo the procedure because they don't relish having an endoscope inserted into their body, and they don't like the preparation for the procedure, which requires drinking laxatives and spending large amounts of time in the lavatory the night before.
FOOD
July 18, 1985 | DR. JEAN MAYER and JEANNE GOLDBERG
In polite company, it may still be considered an indelicate subject. But judging from the swelling size of the laxative industry, constipation seems to be an all-too-common national ailment. In 1982, Americans spent no less than $368 million on the more than 120 preparations available over the counter. How do these products work, when should they be used, and most important, how do you prevent the problem in the first place?
HEALTH
August 3, 2009 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon
I have had severe constipation for years. I've been using cascara sagrada for a daily bowel movement. I read that this herb was banned in 2002 as the Food and Drug Administration wasn't sure it was safe. Is it safe or not? I have tried fiber, stool softeners, you name it. Cascara sagrada is the only thing that works for me. My doctor thinks I should take something different. Stimulant laxatives such as cascara sagrada can lead to dependence.
HEALTH
February 23, 2004
Native Americans in the Pacific Northwest first began using cascara sagrada, or sacred bark, hundreds of years ago. When dried and aged for a year, the bark of Rhamnus purshiana, a tree related to the California buckthorn, becomes an effective stimulant laxative, meaning it causes the intestinal muscles to contract. The plant's active ingredients are found in some over-the-counter laxatives.
HEALTH
July 26, 2004 | Elena Conis
The name psyllium refers to the husk, seed and plant known in scientific circles as Plantago ovata. The seed grain of the annual plant is rich in soluble fiber. It's an ingredient in some cereals and several over-the-counter laxatives, including Fiberall and Metamucil. * Uses: Psyllium is used to treat constipation, high cholesterol, irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhea. It's sometimes used in attempts to lose weight and manage diabetes.
SCIENCE
May 14, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details. A colonoscopy is a life-saving procedure, identifying polyps and early-stage tumors so they can be removed before they grow and spread. But many people refuse to undergo the procedure because they don't relish having an endoscope inserted into their body, and they don't like the preparation for the procedure, which requires drinking laxatives and spending large amounts of time in the lavatory the night before.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Attention, all you suffers of chronic constipation -- a drug called linaclotide may help make relieving yourself ... well, more of a relief. A study released online Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine found in two double-blind trials that linaclotide could ease constipation in people who had fewer than three complete spontaneous bowel movements per week (without the aid of a laxative, enema or suppository). Many of these participants also suffered straining, lumpy or hard stools -- or a sense of incomplete relief, if you get my drift.  In the two trials involving a total of 1,272 people, the researchers had study participants take either a 145-microgram dose of the drug, a higher 290-microgram dose or a placebo pill once a day for 12 weeks at least 30 minutes before breakfast.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Attention, all you suffers of chronic constipation -- a drug called linaclotide may help make relieving yourself ... well, more of a relief. A study released online Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine found in two double-blind trials that linaclotide could ease constipation in people who had fewer than three complete spontaneous bowel movements per week (without the aid of a laxative, enema or suppository). Many of these participants also suffered straining, lumpy or hard stools -- or a sense of incomplete relief, if you get my drift.  In the two trials involving a total of 1,272 people, the researchers had study participants take either a 145-microgram dose of the drug, a higher 290-microgram dose or a placebo pill once a day for 12 weeks at least 30 minutes before breakfast.
HEALTH
November 30, 2009 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Q: Is there anything new on the generic version of Wellbutrin XL? My wife had done well on the brand name and then the Watson generic bupropion for several years. She was abruptly switched to Teva's Budeprion last spring. Her depression returned. Within a month, she was on the brink of suicide. When I realized how severe her situation was, I ran out and purchased brand-name Wellbutrin. It took less than a week for her to return to her normal, cheerful self. I work for a pharmaceutical company, and I would never have thought there could be such an issue with a generic.
HEALTH
August 3, 2009 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon
I have had severe constipation for years. I've been using cascara sagrada for a daily bowel movement. I read that this herb was banned in 2002 as the Food and Drug Administration wasn't sure it was safe. Is it safe or not? I have tried fiber, stool softeners, you name it. Cascara sagrada is the only thing that works for me. My doctor thinks I should take something different. Stimulant laxatives such as cascara sagrada can lead to dependence.
HEALTH
July 26, 2004 | Elena Conis
The name psyllium refers to the husk, seed and plant known in scientific circles as Plantago ovata. The seed grain of the annual plant is rich in soluble fiber. It's an ingredient in some cereals and several over-the-counter laxatives, including Fiberall and Metamucil. * Uses: Psyllium is used to treat constipation, high cholesterol, irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhea. It's sometimes used in attempts to lose weight and manage diabetes.
HEALTH
February 23, 2004
Native Americans in the Pacific Northwest first began using cascara sagrada, or sacred bark, hundreds of years ago. When dried and aged for a year, the bark of Rhamnus purshiana, a tree related to the California buckthorn, becomes an effective stimulant laxative, meaning it causes the intestinal muscles to contract. The plant's active ingredients are found in some over-the-counter laxatives.
HEALTH
October 30, 2000 | DON COLBURN, WASHINGTON POST
Of the 7 million Americans a year who undergo a colonoscopy, it's safe to say that none looks forward to it eagerly. Who would? Doctors insert a 5-foot flexible tube through the anus to inspect the rectum and the entire colon, or large bowel, looking for signs of cancer. Yet the vast majority of patients, doctors say, find the colonoscopy procedure much less painful and stressful than they expected.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration plans to require stronger warning labels on non-prescription antacids, laxatives, antidiarrheal drugs, sleep aids and anti-nausea products, the agency announced Thursday. Antacids containing calcium or magnesium would have to carry warnings that they could react with other drugs and advising people to get professional advice before mixing the medications, the FDA said in a statement. The new labels would have to appear in a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1996 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Van Nuys High School senior was suspended Friday for five days and faces expulsion for allegedly giving two female students a pie that may have been tainted with a laxative, school authorities said. The male student, whose name was not released because he is a minor, was arrested earlier this week but no charges will be filed against him, said Los Angeles Unified School District officials.
NEWS
August 30, 1997 | CURT SUPLEE, THE WASHINGTON POST
The Food and Drug Administration is proposing a ban on over-the-counter products containing phenolphthalein, a principal component in most varieties of Ex-Lax and numerous other laxative products, because, it said, the compound poses "a potential cancer risk to people who use this ingredient at higher than recommended doses or for extended periods of time."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1996 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Van Nuys High School senior was suspended Friday for five days and faces expulsion for allegedly giving two female students a pie that may have been tainted with a laxative, school authorities said. The male student, whose name was not released because he is a minor, was arrested earlier this week but no charges will be filed against him, said Los Angeles Unified School District officials.
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