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Layoffs

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Pixar Animation Studios has laid off an undisclosed number of people at its Emeryville, Calif., headquarters due to the delay of its forthcoming film "The Good Dinosaur. " The layoffs affect less than 5% of the company's 1,200-person workforce, according to a source close to the studio. In September, "The Good Dinosaur" was pushed back from its original release date of May 30, 2014, to Nov. 25, 2015. About a month before the project was delayed, the studio, a unit of Walt Disney Studios, removed  director Bob Peterson from the project.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The beleaguered operator of a Vernon battery-recycling plant announced the temporary layoffs of nearly all of its employees Monday, weeks after air-quality regulators shut down its operations over air pollution concerns. Exide Technologies said in a statement that it had issued notices to 104 hourly employees and 20 managers at the facility that they could be laid off within 60 days. The plant, which has been a source of community outrage since regulators announced last year that its arsenic emissions posed a danger to more than 100,000 people, has been idle since last month.
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OPINION
May 26, 2012
Re "HP to shed 27,000 workers," Business, May 24 Hewlett-PackardChief Executive Meg Whitman observes that layoffs "adversely affect people's lives, but in this case [are] absolutely critical for the long-term health of the company. " The goal of business is to make a profit. If you can make money by hiring people, you hire people. If you can't, you fire people. Mitt Romney's background as a venture capitalist is consistent with this reality. A businessman is not in business to be a "job creator," and it is dishonest to suggest otherwise.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Andrea Chang and Tiffany Hsu
Wearable fitness trackers are in survival-of-the-fittest mode. Touted as the next big thing in technology, wearable tech has spawned a dizzying array of Internet-connected wristwatches and head-mounted devices. Leading the fledgling industry are fitness gadgets that count steps taken, calories burned and other measurements of activity. But in racing to meet the hype, many companies may have outpaced demand and rushed out products too soon. Nike said Monday that it plans to lay off a small number of employees who work on its line of FuelBand fitness accessories to "align resources with business priorities," signaling that the sporting equipment giant is scaling back its wearable hardware efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
Layoffs are underway at Sony Pictures Entertainment, the Sony Corp.-owned film and television studio that vowed late last year to significantly reduce its overhead. The cuts, which began Monday and will continue this week, include employees at divisions throughout the studio, according to a source with knowledge of the matter. The layoffs were felt at the studio's Culver City headquarters and at international offices. Among the divisions said to be deeply affected by the staff reductions is Sony Pictures Interactive, the studio's digital marketing arm.  "We are continuously evolving the business to make SPE more efficient and competitive," Sony Pictures spokesman Charles Sipkins said in a statement.  PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV At an investors conference in November, Sony Pictures executives outlined  $250 million in budget cuts that were already underway.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
 Southern California Edison Co. plans to lay off hundreds of employees as part of a management streamlining and outsourcing of some functions such as information technology. The number of workers affected by the cuts will be "in the high hundreds," said Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima), chairman of the Senate Energy, Utilities and Communications Committee. "It's pretty disappointing.... [The cuts] are not going to help" the California economy. Padilla was briefed by his committee consultants, who said they were told that the utility expected to cut 500 in-house employees and another 400 to 500 contract workers beginning this summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
Disney Interactive, the struggling  video game and digital media subsidiary of the Walt Disney Co., is expected to begin a round of layoffs, according to a source with knowledge of the matter. The cuts could come as soon as this week. Disney Interactive, which lost more than $200 million a year between 2008 and 2012, is in a period of transition. The division parted ways with its Co-president John Pleasants in November, just months after the successful launch of its "Disney Infinity" video game.  The Wall Street Journal, which first reported news of the layoffs, said Disney Interactive would lay off "several hundred people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2011 | By Joseph Serna, Los Angeles Times
Costa Mesa cannot lay off employees by outsourcing their jobs to private companies until the city goes through proper legal steps, an Orange County Superior Court judge ruled Tuesday. In a preliminary injunction barring the city from implementing its outsourcing plans, Judge Tam Nomoto Schumann said Costa Mesa must follow necessary steps if it plans to replace 213 employees primarily with private workers. The city issued the layoff notices in March. City officials, meanwhile, said they believed they were in compliance with the law and should be able to execute their austerity measures.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | Joseph Menn and Karen Kaplan
One week after replacing its two top executives, Internet entertainment start-up Digital Entertainment Network laid off between 50 and 60 employees, according to a company insider. The layoffs reduce the Santa Monica firm's work force by 15% to 20%. The staff reductions were aimed at controlling costs at a company that had ballooned from 60 to 300 employees in less than a year, the insider said. A DEN spokeswoman did not return a call seeking comment.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google's acquisition of Motorola Mobility will close in the next two business days, according to a form filed by Motorola Mobility over the weekend. The $12.5-billion takeover, which was announced in August, cleared its final hurdle last week when the Chinese government finally gave the deal a go-ahead, albeit with a condition : Android must remain free and open for the next five years. The deal will give Google an in-house phone manufacturer as the company begins a strategy to fix Android fragmentation by making more unified Android phones and by selling phones directly to customers.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
 Southern California Edison Co. plans to lay off hundreds of employees as part of a management streamlining and outsourcing of some functions such as information technology. The number of workers affected by the cuts will be "in the high hundreds," said Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima), chairman of the Senate Energy, Utilities and Communications Committee. "It's pretty disappointing.... [The cuts] are not going to help" the California economy. Padilla was briefed by his committee consultants, who said they were told that the utility expected to cut 500 in-house employees and another 400 to 500 contract workers beginning this summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Al Jazeera America is laying off dozens of employees as well as a large number of freelancers less than eight months after the news channel made its debut. In a memo to staff, Al Jazeera America President Kate O'Brian said the planning for and launch of Al Jazeera America last August required "considerable resources" and now that the network is up and running, "we are bringing our staffing levels into alignment with our long-range plan as per our original business case. " The cuts were across the entire network.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Howard Blume
Los Angeles school district officials announced a lawsuit settlement Tuesday that will provide $60 million in pay increases, services and staff at about three dozen schools, many hit hard by teacher layoffs. But the pact fails to deal with whether instructors should continue to be dismissed based on seniority. The case of Reed vs. L.A. Unified, filed in 2010, was intended to protect a school from disproportionate layoffs during difficult economic times. Three campuses named in the suit had lost about half their faculty because teachers had less experience than those elsewhere in the system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Howard Blume
Los Angeles school district officials and the teachers union have settled a landmark lawsuit over schools that were disproportionately affected by layoffs. Under the agreement, 37 schools will receive more counselors, more administrators and more training for teachers. Principals and mentor teachers also will receive financial incentives to remain at these campuses in predominantly low-income and minority areas. “The youth in greatest peril at these schools will benefit tremendously from the additional administrative and teacher support provided under this program,” said L.A. schools Supt.  John Deasy in a statement.  But what will not change are the rules for laying off teachers when budget cuts or other factors cause a reduction in staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Howard Blume
A groundbreaking, two-month trial challenging teacher job protections in California concluded Thursday with both sides asserting that the interests of students are at stake. The case, Vergara vs. California, seeks to overturn a set of laws that affect how teachers are fired, laid off and granted tenure. The Silicon Valley-based group Students Matter brought the lawsuit on behalf of nine plaintiffs, contending that the regulations hinder the removal of ineffective teachers. The result is a workforce with thousands of "grossly ineffective" teachers, which disproportionately hurts low-income and minority students, attorneys said.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
About 150 employees at rocket engine maker Aerojet Rocketdyne in Canoga Park were told Wednesday that they would be laid off as part of a companywide reduction that the company says is related to last year's merger. Aerojet Rocketdyne was created by the sale of Rocketdyne to GenCorp Inc. for $550 million, a deal that was finalized last summer. It brought together two major California rocket companies - and longtime competitors. GenCorp already owned Aerojet, the Sacramento aerospace firm founded in 1942.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Citing what he perceives as an Obama administration “war on coal,” an Ohio coal mining executive and prominent Republican donor responded to the results of the presidential election by laying off more than 150 workers. Robert Murray, chief executive of Murray Energy Co., the largest privately held coal company in America, blamed the layoffs on President Obama --  and, by extension, the voters who elected him -- in a memo to employees. “The American people have made their choice,” Murray said in what he called a prayer that he delivered at a staff meeting at which he discussed the layoffs.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Defense giant Lockheed Martin Corp. said Monday it would reduce its planned layoffs to 2,400, after the Pentagon recalled most of the civilian workers it had furloughed because of the partial federal government shutdown. The move came after United Technologies Corp. said Sunday it was canceling the planned layoff of 2,000 employees at its Sikorsky Aircraft Corp., because of the return of the Defense Department workers. Lockheed had announced Friday it would lay off 3,000 employees starting Monday due to the shutdown.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
Layoffs are underway at Sony Pictures Entertainment, the Sony Corp.-owned film and television studio that vowed late last year to significantly reduce its overhead. The cuts, which began Monday and will continue this week, include employees at divisions throughout the studio, according to a source with knowledge of the matter. The layoffs were felt at the studio's Culver City headquarters and at international offices. Among the divisions said to be deeply affected by the staff reductions is Sony Pictures Interactive, the studio's digital marketing arm.  "We are continuously evolving the business to make SPE more efficient and competitive," Sony Pictures spokesman Charles Sipkins said in a statement.  PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV At an investors conference in November, Sony Pictures executives outlined  $250 million in budget cuts that were already underway.
OPINION
March 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Last week President Obama ordered the Department of Labor to revise regulations determining which workers qualify for federal overtime protections, a move that was presented as a way to increase income for some lower-wage workers. It's not. In reality, it's a matter of basic fairness. The issue begins with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which established the national minimum wage for most workers and guaranteed overtime pay for more than 40 hours of work a week. But the law also allowed overtime exemptions to be set by the Labor Department.
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