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Laziness

NEWS
November 18, 1989 | JAN HOFMANN
The Scene Newport Harbor's Reuben E. Lee river boat-restaurant, where the Red Ribbon 100 women's advisory council to the Orange County chapter of the American Red Cross--and hundreds more--stepped aboard Tuesday for an evening of champagne and wine tasting. The moon wasn't quite as full as the showboat (filled to capacity with about 400 guests). Elbows got a full workout, bending frequently to lift those souvenir champagne glasses and politely prodding their way through the close-packed crowd.
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SPORTS
March 11, 2001 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a banner day for California-breds Saturday at Santa Anita. Horses from the state won six of the nine races, including the two big prizes. Lazy Slusan, a 6-year-old mare who was claimed for $62,500 last summer at Del Mar by trainer John Dolan for himself and I.S. Longo, overtook 17-10 favorite Spain in the final yards to win the $300,000 Santa Margarita Invitational Handicap.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The night was waiting to become history. Monika Pajerova felt a surge of hope as she looked out over the crowd. There were thousands of them! The flickering candles they held illuminated their young faces, and in their smiles, Monika was certain she saw joy. "I thought that something--I didn't know what, but something--was beginning right then," the 23-year-old philosophy student recalled. It turned out to be a revolution.
FOOD
August 1, 1991 | RUSS PARSONS, RUSS PARSONS,
The first time Wolfgang Puck went to the Hollywood Bowl, a friend asked him to bring a salmon en croute. "I made a big one--usually they're for six," he says. "This one was for 16. When he arrived at the Bowl, he paraded the salmon all over the place--he had to show everyone. And he let each person taste a little bit of the puff pastry. Then he sat down and ate so much of the salmon he got sick. "I don't make salmon en croute very often anymore," Puck says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1997 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dear Street Smart: I thought you might be able to refer me to the group that protects handicapped parking spaces at markets, shopping malls, etc. I know of a person who hangs an expired red handicapped parking sign on the mirror just to avoid parking a few slots away. Lazy, cunning and disrespectful. That's the type that should be cited--and not just warned by the state Department of Motor Vehicles. Can you get me the contact to those folks who canvass parking areas?
FOOD
August 1, 1991 | KATHIE JENKINS
This time of year almost everybody's got some sort of a picnic to pack for. Some are off to the Hollywood Bowl; others just want a lazy afternoon in the park. And while it might be nice to whip up a basket of food and impress your friends, it might be even nicer to have somebody else do all the work. Keep in mind that most places require at least 24 hours advance notice--and remember to pack a corkscrew. The rest is up to them. Bristol Farms, 1570 Rosecrans Ave., Manhattan Beach. (213) 643-5229.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a subdued voice, a sonar analyst with a 14-year career of exemplary service testified Monday that he got "a little bit lazy" and broke several safety rules, depriving the captain of the submarine Greeneville of information that could have averted the deadly collision with a Japanese fishing vessel.
NEWS
September 16, 1998 | CHRIS ERSKINE
So we're lying in the front yard, awaiting the first cold snap of fall, which will turn the grass cool and make the leaves on the trees shimmer and come to life. And us as well. "Maybe we should plant a tree," I say, nodding to a bare spot near the driveway. "Nah," says the boy, lying back with a football under his head, the way men do when they think great thoughts. "Let's just sit here." It's still 90 degrees here on this September afternoon, the cool breezes of autumn a good six weeks away.
TRAVEL
April 13, 1986 | CHERYL ADDAMS, Addams is a Seattle free-lance writer.
Capt. Eddy Hazelman looks out over the wheel of the paddle steamer Melbourne and talks about Australia's Murray River with a fond, faraway look in his eyes. She's a shallow one, he says. And with a passable channel only four feet deep in some places and few navigational aids, "We have to know every inch of the bottom like the back of our hands." With much of his life spent on the Murray, Capt.
HEALTH
August 27, 2001 | Jane E. Allen
Researchers have found a way to screen infants for lazy eye at a time when they're too young to look at charts or read. That's important because early diagnosis of the disorder can avert the vision loss and learning problems that often go undetected until a child reaches school age. The technique, devised by researchers at the University of Missouri-Columbia, relies upon multiple images recorded on videotape.
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