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Le Corbusier

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
NEW YORK - It's easy to imagine that "Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes," a vast, dense and beautifully installed new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, began as a kind of parlor game. You can almost picture the curators, Jean-Louis Cohen and Barry Bergdoll, brainstorming to come up with the most unlikely, counterintuitive thesis about Le Corbusier they could - and then setting out to defend it with straight faces, deep scholarship and a good deal of museological firepower.
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HOME & GARDEN
February 15, 2014 | By Marissa Gluck
When Samad Firdosy bought the two-bedroom, one-bath home in La Crescenta in 2005, it was a fairly conventional single-story ranch house - with one difference. The house was nestled in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains and bordered in back by a 6-acre watershed owned by the Los Angeles County Flood Control District. But it failed to take advantage of its rustic landscape and mountain views. Firdosy says he purchased the house intending to add more space but just couldn't visualize how. So the Jet Propulsion Lab materials engineer called a friend - Ali Jeevanjee of LOC Architects in downtown L.A. - to design an addition for him. Jeevanjee had grown up with him and done a renovation for Firdosy's parents.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2003 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
In 1944, Nazi bombs destroyed Notre Dame de Ronchamp, a chapel perched since the 11th century on a hill in rural France. In 1950, the Catholic Church hired Le Corbusier to put it back together again. Le Corbusier was an atheist, a socialist and a Modernist designer known for his unsparing grid-like structures, but the unlikely commission resulted in one of the most dramatic turnabouts in 20th century architecture.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
NEW YORK - It's easy to imagine that "Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes," a vast, dense and beautifully installed new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, began as a kind of parlor game. You can almost picture the curators, Jean-Louis Cohen and Barry Bergdoll, brainstorming to come up with the most unlikely, counterintuitive thesis about Le Corbusier they could - and then setting out to defend it with straight faces, deep scholarship and a good deal of museological firepower.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just a couple dozen grainy photographs and a few sketchy plans are all that remain of Le Corbusier's revolutionary Pavilion of the New Spirit, a model apartment the early Modernist architect made in 1925 for a decorative arts exposition in Paris. But those few documents have marked the pages of history books ever since and remain shocking for how much they were able to foretell the look of today's built landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
When we debate the endlessly tricky subjects of cultural patrimony and looted art, the pieces that usually come to mind are marble statues from classical antiquity or paintings stolen and stashed away during wartime. Not street art. And certainly not manhole covers. But thanks to Banksy, the elusive London-based artist, as well as fresh questions about the fate of Chandigarh, the Indian city designed in the 1950s by Modernist architect Le Corbusier, preparatory notes for a new chapter in this long story have shown up in the press in recent days.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
Le Corbusier--the pseudonymous Swiss-born architect famous for his severe, functional buildings--generally came to his office in Paris only after spending the morning at home working on his paintings. In 1918, as a self-taught 31-year-old fresh from a small Alpine town, Charles-Edouard Jeanneret had encountered the painter and designer Amedee Ozenfant, who dazzled him with the geometric harmonies of Purism (a smoothed-out, more readable offshoot of Cubism).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
Le Corbusier A Life Nicholas Fox Weber Knopf: 848 pp., $45 "Until now," writes Nicholas Fox Weber, "there has been no substantial biography of Le Corbusier." The leader of Modernist architecture left scattered print remains in his wake -- memoirs by those who knew him, descriptions of his work and books and essays about architecture by Le Corbusier himself, but this is the first attempt to capture the man in the full context of his personal life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer.
Artistic movements nearly always spring from a desire to throw out the old and bring in the new. That's certainly true of Purism, a post-World War I, Paris-based movement that promoted an aesthetic of refinement and clarification. The founders of Purism, artists Amedee Ozenfant and Charles-Edouard Jeanneret (better known by his pseudonym, Le Corbusier), titled their manifesto "Apres le cubism" ('After Cubism") and dismissed their Cubist predecessors' work as outdated decoration.
REAL ESTATE
March 16, 1986
Sam Hall Kaplan's March 2 column on Charles Moore's lecture at UCLA was a remarkable catalogue of misinformation. It begins by getting the name of the school wrong; the lecture was at the Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Planning. It refers to Charles Moore as "late of UCLA." This will surprise many of his students and colleagues; Charles Moore continues to hold the position of adjunct professor at UCLA, and will teach two important courses here in spring. It tendentiously asserts that Frank Lloyd Wright, Mies van der Rohe, and Le Corbusier never attended architecture school.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
When we debate the endlessly tricky subjects of cultural patrimony and looted art, the pieces that usually come to mind are marble statues from classical antiquity or paintings stolen and stashed away during wartime. Not street art. And certainly not manhole covers. But thanks to Banksy, the elusive London-based artist, as well as fresh questions about the fate of Chandigarh, the Indian city designed in the 1950s by Modernist architect Le Corbusier, preparatory notes for a new chapter in this long story have shown up in the press in recent days.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010
Reviews by Sharon Mizota(S.M.). and Leah Ollman (L.O.). Compiled by Grace Krilanovich. Continuing Alexis Mackenzie: Dreaming is Easy Mackenzie spells out a word or phrase in letters consisting of carefully clipped images from old illustrated botanical or anatomical texts. The roots of her work stretch back to manuscript illumination of the middle ages. Filter that reverential practice through a vaguely Romantic poetic sensibility, and you'll end up with Mackenzie's word collages -- lovely, unsettling things made with impeccable finesse (L.O.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
Le Corbusier A Life Nicholas Fox Weber Knopf: 848 pp., $45 "Until now," writes Nicholas Fox Weber, "there has been no substantial biography of Le Corbusier." The leader of Modernist architecture left scattered print remains in his wake -- memoirs by those who knew him, descriptions of his work and books and essays about architecture by Le Corbusier himself, but this is the first attempt to capture the man in the full context of his personal life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2007 | Stanley Meisler, Special to The Times
WHEN portions of "Ulysses" first appeared in a literary magazine from 1918 to 1920, its Irish author, James Joyce, wanted the world to know that he had created a new kind of novel, resembling nothing that came before. When Igor Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" premiered in Paris in 1913, the Russian composer's music was so dissonant, new and shocking that the audience rioted.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2003 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
In 1944, Nazi bombs destroyed Notre Dame de Ronchamp, a chapel perched since the 11th century on a hill in rural France. In 1950, the Catholic Church hired Le Corbusier to put it back together again. Le Corbusier was an atheist, a socialist and a Modernist designer known for his unsparing grid-like structures, but the unlikely commission resulted in one of the most dramatic turnabouts in 20th century architecture.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just a couple dozen grainy photographs and a few sketchy plans are all that remain of Le Corbusier's revolutionary Pavilion of the New Spirit, a model apartment the early Modernist architect made in 1925 for a decorative arts exposition in Paris. But those few documents have marked the pages of history books ever since and remain shocking for how much they were able to foretell the look of today's built landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1997 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
Remember the future? It's been one of the driving ideals of the 20th century, but it's looking increasingly threadbare as we lurch toward the millennium. If you doubt that the future as utopian concept has been left behind like a forgotten umbrella, take a trip to the Margo Leavin Gallery, where the exhibition "Modernist French Furniture" is on view through Aug. 23.
REAL ESTATE
December 20, 1987
Sam Hall Kaplan's impression of British architecture is misguided. It was not American influence but a European one that gave London much of its present architecture. The National Westminster Tower (Richard Seifert, c.1980), the London Hilton (Lewis Solomon, 1961) and any number of other tower blocks, such as the eponymous London Wall (L.C.C. Architects, 1955, etc.) owe their development to the influence of the German architect Mies van der Rohe, who designed similar tower blocks as early as 1922, long before he moved to the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer.
Artistic movements nearly always spring from a desire to throw out the old and bring in the new. That's certainly true of Purism, a post-World War I, Paris-based movement that promoted an aesthetic of refinement and clarification. The founders of Purism, artists Amedee Ozenfant and Charles-Edouard Jeanneret (better known by his pseudonym, Le Corbusier), titled their manifesto "Apres le cubism" ('After Cubism") and dismissed their Cubist predecessors' work as outdated decoration.
MAGAZINE
May 16, 1999 | Debra J. Hotaling
Using balsa wood, fabric swatches and wood scraps, 7-year-old Emma Kramer puts the finishing touches on her house of the future: a sprawling California residence that refuses to conform to architectural tradition. "You go through here," says Kramer of the model house's entry, "and there's the bed." She points to where many of us, bogged down in convention, might mistakenly place a couch.
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