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Le Kha Phieu

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April 18, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnam's top leader, Communist Party Secretary-General Le Kha Phieu, was removed from office Tuesday because of disenchantment with his conservative style, officials said. The leading candidate to replace the 70-year-old party leader reportedly is Nong Duc Manh, a member of the ethnic Tay minority who would be expected to promote economic change and the development of a market economy more quickly than his predecessor.
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NEWS
April 18, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnam's top leader, Communist Party Secretary-General Le Kha Phieu, was removed from office Tuesday because of disenchantment with his conservative style, officials said. The leading candidate to replace the 70-year-old party leader reportedly is Nong Duc Manh, a member of the ethnic Tay minority who would be expected to promote economic change and the development of a market economy more quickly than his predecessor.
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NEWS
December 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Lt. Gen. Le Kha Phieu has been appointed chief of Vietnam's ruling Communist Party, party sources said. He was chosen at a closed-door meeting of the party Central Committee to replace General Secretary Do Muoi, they said. Phieu, 66, is seen by Western observers as a conservative. He has warned that Vietnam is threatened by unnamed external forces seeking to take advantage of the country's economic and political liberalization.
NEWS
November 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Vietnam's most famous general and its prime minister said they were pleased with a three-day historic visit by President Clinton that ended Sunday. Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap, the architect of the victory over France in 1954 and over U.S.-backed forces in 1975, said Clinton's visit "strengthens relations between the two countries." Prime Minister Phan Van Khai, speaking in Hanoi, echoed Giap's sentiments.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | United Press International
Vietnam withdrew its top commanders and military advisers from Cambodia today and disclosed that its nearly 10-year war against resistance forces has cost the lives of 55,000 Vietnamese soldiers--about the same number as U.S. troops lost in the Vietnam War. The disclosure of losses by Lt. Gen. Le Kha Phieu, deputy commander of the Vietnamese forces in Cambodia, was the first official acknowledgment of his country's casualties.
NEWS
April 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Vietnam's ruling Communist Party named National Assembly Chairman Nong Duc Manh as its new secretary-general Sunday, filling the country's most powerful leadership post. Sixty-year-old Manh has been speaker of the National Assembly for nine years. Under his leadership, the assembly, which once rubber-stamped decisions behind closed doors, became a forum for televised discussions of policy issues.
OPINION
April 22, 2001
The ruling old dogs in Hanoi could not learn new tricks, and they never really tried very hard. They gave a new name--doi moi, or open door--to their Communist governing philosophy though they kept the old tools: political oppression and rigid economic order administered by arbitrary rules and corrupt officials. Transforming Communist Vietnam will take years, but the pressure on the power elite is mounting and some of the officials who stood in the way of progress are leaving.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, making a rare visit to Vietnam by a high-profile official of the United States, said Monday that a key trade agreement between the former adversaries has been put back on track after it appeared to have stalled because of opposition by old-line Communist leaders.
NEWS
September 26, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several years of heady growth and enthusiastic support from international investors and donors, Vietnam finds itself facing a sobering reality: Those forecasts that it would soon join the elite fraternity of Asian nations known as economic "tigers" were wildly premature.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months after Hanoi and Washington struck a landmark deal to normalize economic ties, two deadlines for signing the formal agreement have passed, raising fears both sides could end up empty-handed after years of tough negotiations. To many political analysts, the delay is confirmation that the debate rages on between reformists and conservatives in the secretive Politburo over the fundamental question of whether Vietnam really wants to commit itself to a free-market economy.
NEWS
July 1, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
In 11 years of war against Cambodian guerrillas, 55,000 Vietnamese soldiers have been killed and an equal number wounded, the deputy commander of Hanoi's occupation forces in Cambodia said here Thursday. The casualty report represented Hanoi's first disclosure of its war dead in the long-running Cambodian conflict. It was delivered by Gen. Le Kha Phieu at a news conference at Tan Son Nhut airport, where American planes left Vietnam 13 years ago, ending a conflict that took the lives of 58,000 U.
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