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Le Ly Hayslip

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1993 | JACK MATHEWS, NEWSDAY
Let's play this story as a short movie in our heads. An Oliver Stone movie, with multiple flashbacks, quick cuts and plenty of dense political observations. It's the only way to tell a story that covers two mirror-opposite lives, two radically different cultures, and the most divisive foreign war in American history.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1994
I am writing in response to the two articles, ("Hostile Fire in Little Saigon," and "Expatriates Vent Anger at Author, Movie Portrayals," Jan. 16). It is very sad and unfortunate that the protesters of the works of Le Ly Hayslip should harbor so much ill-will for this remarkable woman who has suffered so much but has managed to rise above it all. It is obvious that these protesters do not see Hayslip for what she really is: for one thing, she is not a communist, of which many in the Vietnamese-American community accuse her. The work that her organization, East Meets West, provides for the people of Vietnam is a humanitarian mission, one which transcends all political barriers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They can never forgive or forget. Nor do they want to. For a small group of expatriate Vietnamese who live in Orange County, to forgive the Communist government that chased them from their homes--leaving family, friends and neighbors dead--is to trample the memory of what once was their nation, the Republic of Vietnam. The expatriates, who vented their anger at author Le Ly Hayslip in a surprisingly hostile demonstration Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They can never forgive or forget. Nor do they want to. For a small group of expatriate Vietnamese who live in Orange County, to forgive the Communist government that chased them from their homes--leaving family, friends and neighbors dead--is to trample the memory of what once was their nation, the Republic of Vietnam. The expatriates, who vented their anger at author Le Ly Hayslip in a surprisingly hostile demonstration Jan.
BOOKS
June 25, 1989 | Lynne Bundesen, Bundesen lived in Southeast Asia for four years. Her memoir will be published next year by Simon & Schuster
It is said that on the day when some one woman, any woman, finally succeeds in telling the truth about her life, the world will be split in two. Millions of us are waiting for that day, watching for it, nurturing its possibility. Le Ly Hayslip's memoir of the War in Vietnam is not the book that will split the world in two, but it is that kind of book. It should be required reading in military colleges and in high schools and universities looking for broader, more personal interpretations of geo-politics.
MAGAZINE
March 26, 1989
As a two-tour veteran of the Vietnam War, I was very upset with your magazine's decision to print "Vietnam War Memoir: The Other Side," by Le Ly Hayslip with Jay Wurts (Feb. 5). It seems quite ironic to me that in our country, freedom of speech and freedom of the press also exist for those who fought against and killed those who fought for those very rights. You owe every Vietnam vet an apology. WILLIAM J. PRICE Acton
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1994
I am writing in response to the two articles, ("Hostile Fire in Little Saigon," and "Expatriates Vent Anger at Author, Movie Portrayals," Jan. 16). It is very sad and unfortunate that the protesters of the works of Le Ly Hayslip should harbor so much ill-will for this remarkable woman who has suffered so much but has managed to rise above it all. It is obvious that these protesters do not see Hayslip for what she really is: for one thing, she is not a communist, of which many in the Vietnamese-American community accuse her. The work that her organization, East Meets West, provides for the people of Vietnam is a humanitarian mission, one which transcends all political barriers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Without the passionate interest of writer-director Oliver Stone, "Heaven and Earth" and its woman's point of view on the trauma of Vietnam might not have made it to the screen. But Stone is this film's burden as well as its champion. His presence and his style are so overwrought and insistent that the most lasting impression the movie makes concerns not Vietnam or even women but the sensibility and technique of Oliver Stone himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1993 | JACK MATHEWS
Hiep Thi Le says that even though she was only 9 years old, she can still see the look on her sister's face that night in 1979 when a fishing boat captain grabbed her screaming 7-year-old sister and put a knife to her throat. "Tears rolled down her face, but there was no more crying," says the now 23-year-old Le. "I thought her eyes were going to fall out of their sockets."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the moment she sat down to write her memoirs more than 10 years ago, Le Ly Hayslip knew she would place herself under attack from the Vietnamese American community for revealing how she lived her life in Vietnam. It was a life that included aiding Vietnamese Communist soldiers, working as a prostitute and marrying an American.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the moment she sat down to write her memoirs more than 10 years ago, Le Ly Hayslip knew she would place herself under attack from the Vietnamese American community for revealing how she lived her life in Vietnam. It was a life that included aiding Vietnamese Communist soldiers, working as a prostitute and marrying an American.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Without the passionate interest of writer-director Oliver Stone, "Heaven and Earth" and its woman's point of view on the trauma of Vietnam might not have made it to the screen. But Stone is this film's burden as well as its champion. His presence and his style are so overwrought and insistent that the most lasting impression the movie makes concerns not Vietnam or even women but the sensibility and technique of Oliver Stone himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1993 | JACK MATHEWS, NEWSDAY
Let's play this story as a short movie in our heads. An Oliver Stone movie, with multiple flashbacks, quick cuts and plenty of dense political observations. It's the only way to tell a story that covers two mirror-opposite lives, two radically different cultures, and the most divisive foreign war in American history.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1993 | JACK MATHEWS, Jack Mathews is the film critic for Newsday
Oliver Stone is making 'Heaven and Earth,' a film that may generate more controversy than his first two Vietnam movies--'Platoon' and 'Born on the Fourth of July.' This time Stone tells the story of a Vietnamese woman born to war and exposes America to a view of the conflict that we have yet to face. * Watching an Oliver Stone movie being shot is like watching an Oliver Stone movie being shown.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1993 | JACK MATHEWS
Hiep Thi Le says that even though she was only 9 years old, she can still see the look on her sister's face that night in 1979 when a fishing boat captain grabbed her screaming 7-year-old sister and put a knife to her throat. "Tears rolled down her face, but there was no more crying," says the now 23-year-old Le. "I thought her eyes were going to fall out of their sockets."
BOOKS
June 25, 1989 | Lynne Bundesen, Bundesen lived in Southeast Asia for four years. Her memoir will be published next year by Simon & Schuster
It is said that on the day when some one woman, any woman, finally succeeds in telling the truth about her life, the world will be split in two. Millions of us are waiting for that day, watching for it, nurturing its possibility. Le Ly Hayslip's memoir of the War in Vietnam is not the book that will split the world in two, but it is that kind of book. It should be required reading in military colleges and in high schools and universities looking for broader, more personal interpretations of geo-politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1993 | JACK MATHEWS, Jack Mathews is the film critic for Newsday
Oliver Stone is making 'Heaven and Earth,' a film that may generate more controversy than his first two Vietnam movies--'Platoon' and 'Born on the Fourth of July.' This time Stone tells the story of a Vietnamese woman born to war and exposes America to a view of the conflict that we have yet to face. * Watching an Oliver Stone movie being shot is like watching an Oliver Stone movie being shown.
MAGAZINE
April 23, 1989
I gather from the two letters responding to the story by Le Ly Hayslip (with Jay Wurts, "The Other Side," Feb. 5) that a country may be able to recall its men from the battlefield but it cannot recall their minds. I trust the day will come when all people will realize the real enemy is war and that all people are its casualties. Until then, however, keep reporting the other side, without apologies. SANDRA MORALES Monrovia
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