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Leadership Education For Asian Pacifics Organization

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1999 | CHRIS CEBALLOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a time when national minority organizations are pushing for better representation on network television, a handful of Orange County Asian Pacific Americans have been training to establish a foothold in a different arena: local politics. While the number of Asian Pacific Americans has more than tripled in Orange County since the '80s, the group is conspicuously absent from local leadership positions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1999 | CHRIS CEBALLOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a time when national minority organizations are pushing for better representation on network television, a handful of Orange County Asian Pacific Americans have been training to establish a foothold in a different arena: local politics. While the number of Asian Pacific Americans has more than tripled in Orange County since the '80s, the group is conspicuously absent from local leadership positions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1998 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Asian Americans struggle to gain recognition and representation in society, the very quality that binds them sets them apart. "There are many people out there who do not see Asian Americans as Americans," said Mike Matsuda, a former state Assembly candidate and a panelist at Saturday's Asian Pacific American Leadership Summit at Santa Ana College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1998 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Asian Americans struggle to gain recognition and representation in society, the very quality that binds them sets them apart. "There are many people out there who do not see Asian Americans as Americans," said Mike Matsuda, a former state Assembly candidate and a panelist at Saturday's Asian Pacific American Leadership Summit at Santa Ana College.
NEWS
July 15, 1998 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Nakasone grew up as one of a handful of Asian Americans in the San Fernando Valley community of of Tujunga. That, he says, forced him to assimilate early and prepared him for the corporate world. But as he moved up the ladder at Toys R Us, the third-generation Japanese American also kept a reminder of his family's history--a brown government blanket issued to his mother at an Idaho internment camp during World War II.
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