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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
A strike by union directors against South Coast Repertory and other members of the League of Resident Theaters was narrowly averted Tuesday when the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers tentatively agreed to a four-year contract with the league. The terms of the contract "fall far short of the union's stated goals," according David Rosenak, who heads the SSDC. But the union's executive board voted to accept the league's final offer and recommended approval to the membership.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
Playwright A.R. Gurney, forced to choose between the Dramatists Guild and San Diego's Old Globe Theatre, has resigned from the guild--and from his position as secretary of the guild. At issue was the contract for his new play, "The Snow Ball," slated to open at the Old Globe May 9. The Dramatists Guild had called for a boycott of all League of Resident Theatres (LORT) members that refused to implement a guild-proposed standard minimum contract.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1989 | Jan Herman
David Rosenak sounds like a reasonable man. He says all he wants is the chance for the members of his union, the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers, to make a living sufficient to remain in the theater. "We are dealing with theatrical institutions that have grown enormously," Rosenak, the society's executive secretary, said recently from New York. "They invested millions of dollars in buildings. They hired business managers. They expanded their staffs. They bought computers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
A strike by union directors against South Coast Repertory and other members of the League of Resident Theaters was narrowly averted Tuesday when the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers tentatively agreed to a four-year contract with the league. The terms of the contract "fall far short of the union's stated goals," according David Rosenak, who heads the SSDC. But the union's executive board voted to accept the league's final offer and recommended approval to the membership.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
Playwright A.R. Gurney, forced to choose between the Dramatists Guild and San Diego's Old Globe Theatre, has resigned from the guild--and from his position as secretary of the guild. At issue was the contract for his new play, "The Snow Ball," slated to open at the Old Globe May 9. The Dramatists Guild had called for a boycott of all League of Resident Theatres (LORT) members that refused to implement a guild-proposed standard minimum contract.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Dramatists Guild, which claims a membership of 7,000 U.S. and British playwrights, has drawn up a standard contract for use by authors whose works are produced in theaters associated with the League of Resident Theaters. League officials, however, refused to participate in negotiations and reportedly intend to ignore the guild's new document.
NEWS
August 29, 1985 | Associated Press
A strike that threatened to darken stages at regional and repertory theaters across the country was averted today when Actors' Equity and the League of Resident Theaters reached a tentative three-year contract agreement. The contract to be voted upon by the membership would apply to the 77 regional theaters and repertory companies of the league, as well as 16 theaters that have not joined the league but which abide by the Actors' Equity contract.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1985 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Tentative agreement was reached Thursday between Actors' Equity Assn. and the League of Resident Theaters on a new three-year contract, averting a threatened strike that would have begun at midnight Sunday. Both the union and producers' negotiating teams said they would strongly recommend the contract to Equity's governing council and membership and to the league. Both groups must ratify the contract.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1988 | JAN HERMAN
The Grove Theatre Company has entered its first formal agreement with the Actors Equity Assn., artistic director Thomas Bradac said Monday. The contract, expected to be approved today at the union's New York headquarters, would allow the company in Garden Grove to hire Equity actors on a seasonal basis, rather than show to show, as it has been doing. "It's the first step on the road to full professional status," said Bradac, who founded the nonprofit company 10 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers has rejected a final contract offer from the League of Resident Theaters in a nationwide vote by a margin of 61% to 39%. The vote could affect South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, Orange County's only league theater. A mere 18% of the 1,039 members in the directors' union voted. A top union official said Wednesday that the union is "eager to go back to the bargaining table" after offering on Tuesday to extend its old contract with the league through Aug. 8 so that member theaters "can proceed as usual" with their seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1989 | Jan Herman
David Rosenak sounds like a reasonable man. He says all he wants is the chance for the members of his union, the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers, to make a living sufficient to remain in the theater. "We are dealing with theatrical institutions that have grown enormously," Rosenak, the society's executive secretary, said recently from New York. "They invested millions of dollars in buildings. They hired business managers. They expanded their staffs. They bought computers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1987 | NANCY CHURNIN, A new weekly column about people and events in the arts community, compiled by The Times' arts writers in San Diego
San Diego will be the only Southern California stop for El Teatro de la Esperanza's production of "Hijos: Once a Family." The show, which will be performed partly in English and partly in Spanish, tells the story of a Texas family who moves to Los Angeles in the hope of "making it," only to have the children grow ashamed of their roots. Staging is scheduled for 8 p.m. Saturday at Chula Vista Junior High School Auditorium.
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