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Leah Ward Sears

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June 29, 2005 | Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writer
When Leah Ward Sears was sworn in Tuesday as chief justice of the Georgia Supreme Court, at her side was an old friend and fellow Georgian: Clarence Thomas. They share a hometown, the coastal city of Savannah, and the experience of rising to the top of the judicial system as an African American. Another experience she and the U.S. Supreme Court justice share, Sears said, is political attack.
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NATIONAL
June 29, 2005 | Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writer
When Leah Ward Sears was sworn in Tuesday as chief justice of the Georgia Supreme Court, at her side was an old friend and fellow Georgian: Clarence Thomas. They share a hometown, the coastal city of Savannah, and the experience of rising to the top of the judicial system as an African American. Another experience she and the U.S. Supreme Court justice share, Sears said, is political attack.
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OPINION
October 30, 2007
Genarlow Wilson, who was sentenced to a decade in prison and branded a child molester for having consensual sex with another teenager, is a free man, thanks to what some would call judicial activism. In releasing Wilson, who was 17 when he had oral sex with a 15-year-old girl, the Georgia Supreme Court has done more than redress an individual injustice. It has reminded this nation that judges are not just bureaucrats or (as U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2010 | Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama cast a wider net Wednesday in his search for a Supreme Court nominee, adding a federal judge from Chicago to his working list and soliciting suggestions from lawmakers in a closed-door session. Judge Ann Claire Williams, the first African American ever appointed to the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, joins a list of about 10 other candidates to replace retiring Justice John Paul Stevens, the White House confirmed. Obama said Wednesday that he would announce a nominee before the end of May, but aides to the president — a former constitutional law lecturer — said he was nowhere near winnowing his list of candidates.
NATIONAL
March 18, 2008 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
The Georgia Supreme Court on Monday turned down a death row inmate's request for a new trial, even though most of the key witnesses in the case have recanted or contradicted their earlier testimony. Troy Anthony Davis, 39, was convicted of killing a Savannah police officer after a 1991 trial based entirely on witnesses' accounts. Seven of the nine who implicated Davis have since changed their story in sworn affidavits, with several claiming they were pressured by police in their earlier statements.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2010 | By James Oliphant and Christi Parsons
The White House list of potential nominees to fill the latest vacancy on the Supreme Court comprises an ethnically and geographically diverse group of at least 10 candidates, including established jurists and politicians, moderates and progressives. The list includes a sitting governor, Jennifer M. Granholm of Michigan, and a Cabinet secretary, Janet Napolitano of the Homeland Security Department. But some people who are also believed to be candidates, including Gov. Deval Patrick of Massachusetts, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and banking-bailout watchdog Elizabeth Warren, are not on the list.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2007 | Richard Fausset and Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writers
Genarlow Wilson -- the young man imprisoned for committing a consensual sex act who became, for many, an example of an inequitable criminal justice system -- was released from prison Friday after his conviction was overturned by Georgia's Supreme Court. In 2005, Wilson was convicted of aggravated child molestation for having oral sex with a 15-year-old girl when he was 17. He was sentenced to 10 years without parole, the mandatory minimum under Georgia law at the time.
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