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Leap Year

NEWS
February 21, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is Valentine's Day at a fancy hotel restaurant. The dining room is filled with couples, and the romance in the air is so thick that it feels as if Cupid has just passed through on an uncontrolled rampage of love. Bright red and pink balloons float from railings. Roses are strewn everywhere. Hands reach across tables for two and softly touch. And in a dimly lit corner of the room--a proposal. Cindy Vanderweide and Ron Burns were friends for several years before they fell in love 11 months ago.
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SPORTS
May 19, 1989 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, Times Staff Writer
Two years ago, Lori Svoboda was leaping her way into prominence at El Dorado High School. Svoboda, then a sophomore, became an Orange County sensation in the girls' high jump. She won almost every meet she entered, and set the top mark in the state that year--5-feet 10 1/4-inches--in winning the event at the 1987 Southern Section Masters meet. She was named the 1987 Times' Orange County girls' track and field athlete of the year. Then came 1988--a year Svoboda would like to forget, at least as far as the high jump is concerned.
BOOKS
October 15, 1989 | Charles Bowden, Bowden is a free-lance writer
Steve Erickson, a surrealistic novelist based in Los Angeles, traveled 7,000 miles by train and auto in 23 states tracking the 1988 presidential election. He was in Atlanta for the Democratic convention, but mainly bagged the event by television in his hotel room. He was in New Orleans for the Republican Convention, but split before it began in order to take in the music and bars of Austin, Tex., as well as a UFO belt in the Panhandle. He was periodically hounded by Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No wonder Josephine Carozzo laughs when people tell her she doesn't look her age. "Well, I'm only 24," says the white-haired Bellflower resident. The secret to aging gracefully is only having to face another birthday once every four years, Carozzo is quick to explain. Born a leap year baby on Feb. 29, 1896, the former seamstress turns 100 today. But she's even younger than you think. Thanks to the quirkiness of the leap year calendar, she didn't experience an actual birthday until age 8.
NEWS
February 29, 2000
Something is missing from your calendar this year. At least, that's the way many people born Feb. 29 see it. "Calendar companies don't recognize the day for what it is," said Raenell Dawn, an L.A. native born on leap year day 1960. For 16 years, she and other members of her club, the Honor Society of Leap Day Babies, have asked calendar manufacturers to include the words "Leap Year Day" on Feb. 29, "just like it says New Year's Day." So far, her efforts have been in vain.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | Associated Press
Irene Olsen turned 100 on Saturday--but the number is approximate since it was only her 24th official birthday. Olsen was born in a leap year, on Feb. 29, 1892. Saturday would have been her 25th official birthday except, she said: "There was an eight-year period at the turn of the century when we did not have leap year. So 24 it is." Years ending in double zero must be divisible by 400 to be leap years. That ruled out 1900.
NEWS
February 28, 1992 | NONA YATES
Notice anything unusual about this year? No, not the presidential campaign and elections. . . . There's an extra day, 366 instead of the usual 365. 1992 is a Leap Year. "Leap days" are added every four years to bring the calendar in line with Earth's orbit around the sun, which takes about 365 1/4 days. Without leap days, it could get so out of sync that at some point we would be celebrating Christmas in the middle of summer.
SPORTS
July 19, 1995 | RANDY HARVEY
Today begins the one-year countdown to the 1996 Summer Olympics at Atlanta. Or does it? Because 1996 is a leap year, there actually are 366 days to go before the July 19 opening ceremonies. But who's quibbling? Olympic officials have chosen today to celebrate with these events: --Invitations will be issued from International Olympic Committee headquarters at Lausanne, Switzerland, to 197 countries.
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